How to deal with thai colleagues?

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How to deal with thai colleagues?

Postby Eug » Thu Nov 19, 2015 2:25 pm

Just wondering about your experience in dealing with Thai Colleagues.
Was it a good experience or bad?

In particular how you deal with with those unable to speak with you directly, or unable to give you the information you need in a clear way?

If some thai in the forum I would be really happy to hear also his point of view, I am not judging anyone, just collecting opinion and stories
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Re: How to deal with thai colleagues?

Postby BKKBILL » Thu Nov 19, 2015 6:41 pm

I think if you take the time to read some of the building stories here you will find a wide range, some relatively happy with the work done to those who blame Thais for most if not all of the builds problems. Hopefully you will come somewhere in the middle and leaning to the positive side. If you can be on site daily half the battle is won.
It's not who you know, it's whom you know.
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Re: How to deal with thai colleagues?

Postby Roger Ramjet » Thu Nov 19, 2015 7:15 pm

Eug wrote:If some thai in the forum I would be really happy to hear also his point of view, I am not judging anyone, just collecting opinion and stories

This should open a can of worms, currently Thais are not allowed to have an opinion, especially if that opinion differs from the powers that be.
My Thai wife can tell you some real life instances when she found Thai run Farang companies wanted her to fiddle the books (she's an accounting manager) and when she refused by handing in her resignation and notifying Farang Head Office of what was happening in their company in Thailand, the Thais involved just buried their heads in the sand and refused to accept her resignation...... then they accepted her resignation, but stipulated the date she could resign on.... normally 6 months on or just after an audit to be carried out by their friends, but my wife always stuck to her guns despite massive pressure from within the Thai component in the company.
Sit in any board meeting in a Thai managed company in Thailand and wait till the end of the meeting when the managing director will ask if there are any problems.....and of course even if the company was going bankrupt by his stupidity, not one Thai would tell him, not one Thai would come up with a new innovation or way to save the company, even if that was their job, they would just sit there and say nothing...then start looking for a new job at the end of the meeting, so they could get off the ship before it sank.
And the one thing you can never believe is the piece of paper that Thais produce from their "reputable" Thai University saying they graduated with a high GPA or Honors degree. Just look at the rankings of Thai universities in Asia and start somewhere about the 200 mark and you'll find the first Thai one ranked.
My daughter is currently at the One Young World Summit https://www.oneyoungworld.com/summit-2015 as part of the logistics team (she's in her final semester at Dusit Thani College in International Hotel Management (all in English), a dual degree with the academic certification of Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne) and that's the only reason they were selected to be part of the Summit, because otherwise there wouldn't be an English/French/Thai speaker to assist the guests and guest speakers during their stay..... and there's only 6 of them who can actually speak English and understand it, think about the task and carry through the tasks involved, and of those six she's the only Thai, all the rest come from other Asian countries.
As Bill says, supervision is the key.
Anyway good luck with dealing with Thai colleagues, it will be a mammoth challenge because they are not taught how to work through a problem, they are taught by rote and if it's not something they have been taught correctly at school, then they'll get it wrong. And as 86% of Thai teachers can't even get a pass mark in the core subject they teach, then you're going to have fun..... but they will give you a Thai smile at the end. :lol: :lol:
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Re: How to deal with thai colleagues?

Postby Eug » Fri Nov 20, 2015 9:50 am

Epic answer Roger!!!!! Thank you.


Thank you BKKBILL im going to read some stories in the forum
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Re: How to deal with thai colleagues?

Postby Roger Ramjet » Fri Nov 20, 2015 10:45 am

Eug,
If you go to any high standard hotel that has a "Farang" General Manager (don't try and make an appointment, it won't work) and ask him/her the daunting problems he/she faces, especially with communication to engineering, food and beverage, or even just guest reception, I'me sure he'll regale you with stories to fill a book.
This parody posted in the Bangkok Post this morning should bring at least a smile to the most grumpy bastard here: http://www.goteflthailand.com/thai-engl ... on-parody/ which will give you an understanding of the problems Thais face in the real world once they leave school. I might add the supposed lady teacher in the parody actually speaks, reads and writes perfect English and I don't know how she kept a straight face the whole time.
Who do you blame, the Thai English teacher or the person who appointed her to that position. If you rang the Thai Department of Education English Department I'm sure you could have much frivolity as you wished being transfered from one Thai person to another, by just saying "I don't understand"...... and Thailand is part of ASEAN and will wonder why companies are taking their business to other ASEAN countries or appointing English speakers from the Philippines to crucial positions within the company.
On a brighter note, my wife now works for a Japanese Company where she has 35 Thai staff working for her and it wasn't her degrees that got her the job, it was her knowledge of English and the fact she was honest about why she quit her previous jobs.
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Re: How to deal with thai colleagues?

Postby Eug » Fri Nov 20, 2015 11:07 am

I see Roger... They actually believe to do not need English teacher anymore... http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/general ... ish-tutors

Just got a suggestion fro a Book: 'Working with the thais'
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Re: How to deal with thai colleagues?

Postby Roger Ramjet » Fri Nov 20, 2015 12:21 pm

Eug wrote:They actually believe to do not need English teacher anymore.

I used to watch with my wife and daughter a show on TV every Friday night put on by an Australian/Thai (I'm sorry I can't remember what it's called and my search on Google rvealed nothing, his name was Chris) that was hilarious. It was put on for university students so they could better understand English..... which was their core subject. Thailand, under the many different Education Ministers, has attempted, at various stages, to try and break the back of the various Ministries stranglehold on who they appoint as head of department for English language teaching in various high schools and universities, but always to no avail. A prime example is when my daughter went to a certain "prestigious" high school in Nontharburi to do their English Programme where the core subjects were all taught by native English speakers (mostly Philippino or Thais, the head of depatment deemed proficient) and just two real English speakers who were sacked or replaced many times over. And because the curriculum was devised by the head of the English department, who could barely speak a word of English, the teachers held extra classes on weekends so they had freedom to really teach English. Where they introduced the students to other countries in the Asian region, their customs and laws....a total no no at the high school she went to.
In fact most of what they were taught in English was Thai propaganda and most of it was 3/4 in Thai with a scant translation into English. And when the old head master (Master of Education from New Zealand) was "sacked" and demoted to another "lesser" high school, the English programme was cut to the three first years and a whole new Board of Directors was appointed by the Education Department to keep an eye open for people teaching the students how to think and what they could think.
Their best Thai English teacher was no longer allowed to teach English and was demoted to "coordinator", but only because the parents were paying so much money per term for their children to learn English that the head of the English department was scared she would ruffle too many hi-so's feathers by having her moved.
As I said the whole area of education in Thailand is a can of worms and run from a central administration. Just get your hands on one of the English books used to teach English and you can sit there for hours correcting mistakes, and I recall a certain exam being published in the Bangkok Post, given to university students that had nothing to do with English, but was pure propaganda and the correct answers were wrong and the wrong answers were right.... and nothing happened to the so called PhD Thai English teacher who prepared it.
There's a lot wrong with the Thai education system, especially when the kids have to sit and listen to a Thai teacher spout morals for half an hour each morning, when everyone knew he had two or three Mea Nois, would openly belt the children for even the most minor infraction and was known to touch up the girls given half the chance. Yet he was unmovable because he had been promoted on seniority and had powerful friends in the ministry and because he set the entrance fees the parents had to pay to get their child into the school even if they lived right next to the high school.
Even I used to have to go to the high school to sort out problems; like teachers trying to cut students legal length hair and other stupidity. And to take back confiscated cell phones used outside the classroom. I became an "uncle" to many students I'd never even met because I wasn't scared to talk straight to the head master and threaten to call the police on matters of assault or theft.
It's no wonder the children never received the education they should have and can't solve simple problems, which of course carries on to later life.
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Re: How to deal with thai colleagues?

Postby Eug » Fri Nov 20, 2015 12:30 pm

that's really sad actually, thanks a lot anyway for your insights
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