Load bearing, cavity brickwork.

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Re: Load bearing, cavity brickwork.

Postby Roger Ramjet » Sun May 17, 2015 4:36 pm

FT10toLOS wrote:Excuse my ignorance, but "Superblocks" is the name of the bricks I posted pictures of ?

No, as you come from Australia and are a builder you would be aware Superblocks are what the others call AAC here.
I have never seen the "bricks" in your photos and as I haven't access to a pressure press I couldn't/wouldn't even guess if they were load bearing, heat resistant or even water resistant. The one thing that worried me about them is the near perfect uniformity in colour. A friend of mine (Steve Burridge, a Yank) in Canberra made blocks/bricks that were similar, but he put in straw as well and he had access to a clay pit on his land, but the bricks he made were never the same perfect uniformity in colour, they varied from which side of the clay pit he got the soil from.
I'd be intrigued to learn how this Thai girl makes them and what exactly is in them, where she sells them (1,000 a day is a lot), the weight of them etc etc etc.
You can toss the Aussie spec book out the window here it won't work. You'll be lucky if you can get a builder who can even read plans, if they even want to, let alone follow the specs that come off the CAD programs they use to draw-up those plans. Most of the time it's you doing all the work with architects and getting approval from the Or Bor Tor engineer and then the whole plan being ignored by the builder because it's easier and quicker (it's not) to do it his way.
Good luck when you start building, it should be interesting having an Aussie builder trying to get Thais to do it "his" way.
I look forward to the build. Good luck, you'll need it. I'd go and have a look at the local technical college, then you might get an idea of what you are in for.
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Re: Load bearing, cavity brickwork.

Postby Ians » Sun May 17, 2015 4:45 pm

Originally I opted for load bearing cavity walls, but came up against opposition and the need to find a good reliable and compensation builder interested, found the builder but he wasn't interested in load bearing walls - decision - forget the l/b walls and have a good builder.
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Re: Load bearing, cavity brickwork.

Postby Ians » Sun May 17, 2015 7:13 pm

Ians wrote:Originally I opted for load bearing cavity walls, but came up against opposition and the need to find a good reliable and compensation builder interested, found the builder but he wasn't interested in load bearing walls - decision - forget the l/b walls and have a good builder.


That should read competent builder not comprnsation ( bloody predictive text)
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Re: Load bearing, cavity brickwork.

Postby FT10toLOS » Sun May 17, 2015 9:05 pm

Check out this link I found today,

http://www.fastonline.org/CD3WD_40/GATE ... /EN/IB.HTM

Roger,
My apologies, I've only known "superblocks" as "Hebels" in the past but I've been out of commercial construction for quite a while. In those days they were only used in infill and partition works, definitely not load bearing. I can see their use as a second or insulating skin in a cavity wall though.
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Re: Load bearing, cavity brickwork.

Postby Roger Ramjet » Sun May 17, 2015 10:15 pm

FT10toLOS wrote:My apologies, I've only known "superblocks" as "Hebels" in the past but I've been out of commercial construction for quite a while. In those days they were only used in infill and partition works, definitely not load bearing. I can see their use as a second or insulating skin in a cavity wall though.

I first saw their use by two master builders in Cooma because of their thermal properties. They were being used to construct three new houses for the Snowy Mountains Engineering Corporation. Most of the chalets being constructed at Guthega were also constructed with superblock and seemed to hold up well with a layer of snow on the roof. Not being a builder and being "seconded" around the mountains because of my expertise with explosives, I was impressed with their lightness and ease of laying.
I believe a few members here have used them for load bearing walls with no problems.
I have hung just about everything off mine without the slightest problem and as far as insulation goes they can't be beaten...... if they could judt get their double glazed windows right, they would be on a winner, but all I've seen are cheap Chinese imitations or very very expensive German ones, and the German ones are not for small houses like mine....they are for highrise buildings, which I find amusing as they use the cheap crumbling small red bricks for the outer wall that gets red hot, without an inner wall.
I'm fairly old which is why I've stuck with their original name of "superblock", just like I use feet and inches because all these new measurements I have to look up on my tape measure.
I had a look at the site you posted, but the disadvantages far outweighed the advantages when considering Thai building techniques and Thai labour practices.
Good luck when you start building, I'll keep my eye open.
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Re: Load bearing, cavity brickwork.

Postby edvrijmoet » Mon May 18, 2015 6:12 pm

Check out these links!

http://technologyblockprasan.com/index2.php
http://www.thongratblockprasan.com/board/

The give you a good insight about the different blocks and how to use them.
Both websites are in Thai.

Ed

<Many thanks for your contribution - the first link suggests an English language version but that appears to be non-functional; the other has none. To best assist the majority of our members it would be appreciated if you could post a link to English language alternatives - thanks - mod>
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