Building in chiang mai

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Building in chiang mai

Postby Andyfteeze » Tue Oct 07, 2014 6:20 pm

Ok , its my turn to open up. these plans are almost complete. just a couple of minor adjustments to room sizes.
these are the first drawings. I am now up to the third iteration which should be the last.
we started by working out what rooms we required and ideal locations. i downloaded sketchup to do the basic layouts. This is the most important part of the build. you have to have a house that works for you. A little more time to get everything right should ensure its a relatively smooth process.
we went to the local office and spoke to the engineer. He agreed to do the drawings. this has been a fantastic strategy from the start. Not only does he have a good imagination, but, he rubber stamps everything ! All legal, proper drawings and no piss farting around. Price and timing is absolutely amazing compared to what i am used to. Some parts of melbourne can take up to a year planning permit, then the same for a building permit! and if your new neighbour hates the way you look, ooch!
the only thing i didnt know was that the ONLY regulation was, I had to be 2m from any boundary. minor hickup.
it will be on a stiffened slab. this may be taxing on whoever does the concrete, but i will rule with an iron fist. ok, maybe with persuasion, lol.
i worked out roughly the weight of the whole structure and then calculated the footings area. my bro in laws house next door is two story/tile roof/brick on pads. He still had all the original plans. it was easy to workout the surface area per sqm. so I now know i am on the right track and allowed in effect double the sqm in stiffening beams under the slab. One pour for slab and footings in effect. When i get the engineering drawings, it will be interesting to see if i am right.
Columns will come straight up from the footings . this is not a handicap, i think this will make it relatively easy to close off once the concrete dries off, maybe three to four months from start. Thais are not always wrong.
I tend to be serial in my thinking so I will open up a spread sheet with all the little details and their order of build. This will be my second bible, lol.
there are a whole host of issues i have checked out and sorted in my mind but a lot of others I havent thought about cause we are still along way from getting the build finance in place, but we have the land. I have real estate for sale in melbourne and my wife here. who ever sells first, finances the build, lol.
Over to you guys, what do you think?
Attachments
plan_1.jpg
rd2ps.jpg
perspective2.jpg
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Re: Building in chiang mai

Postby Roger Ramjet » Tue Oct 07, 2014 10:35 pm

I think it's a grand design, but I would be wary about the exposed deck. Even now I am considering building a solid wall on the roof of my workshop/garage. When the wind blows and howls it destroys all but the hardiest of plants. We have a two seater swing that nearly got blown into the rice paddies the day it arrived and we (the assemblers and I) had to move it onto the sheltered veranda.
If you do go ahead with the deck make sure you use power floats: viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1864&start=540 photos on this page and make sure they are sealed and that Lanko is added to the mix. The reasons why are on the previous pages.
I notice there is no dining room?????? I always understood music rooms to be hexagonal. Or is it really a games room?
Your going to have a lot of problems getting a Thai builder to pour beams and slab at the same time. For one thing it's too expensive with him supplying the wood, for another, they just don't do it that way and it causes problems with bathrooms.
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Re: Building in chiang mai

Postby Mike Judd » Wed Oct 08, 2014 4:08 am

Well you ask for opinions but it's a bit hard to comment with the measurements as they are. I take it W.C. means toilets only with one bigger one the bathroom . Unless you are building a Boarding house it seems there are too many W.C.'s on the upper floor. The usual set up is the main bedroom with it's en-suite and the others sharing a bathroom. But you might have a reason for it. The upper deck is a good idea if the outlook is worth it and is going to be used, but it is an expensive way of finishing off the top of a house , especially making sure it's water proof with what ever finishes you decide on. Make sure there is enough room for all the stairs which require the max amount of run to ensure the risers are not too high. ( Common problem with Thai steps) Good luck.! :D :D
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Re: Building in chiang mai

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Wed Oct 08, 2014 6:38 pm

There is also the fact that for a good portion of the year it will be too hot on the flat roof and you will probably either need to shade it or just not use it.
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Re: Building in chiang mai

Postby Andyfteeze » Thu Oct 09, 2014 12:13 pm

Thanks guys, and yes there is reason for the madness, lol.
There are four in the family and everyone wants a toilet and shower. Spare room is for visitors and yes, they need a WC too!
Yes it's overkill, but to hell with convention. I am going for something different. I can afford it too, that helps.
No dining room you say! Did you work for a bank in a previous life? When I built my last house in melbourne, the bank manager said the same thing. Formal dinner went out of fashion with upstairs down stairs' last replay.
Yes in some ways having a terrazzo upstairs is more expensive but it has plenty of benefits.
1/ enjoy the view
2/ I can have a garden upstairs
3/ soil over the slab is a good way to insulate
4/ a pleasant place to chill out on a cool evening
5/ it's an elegant way to cap off the design with something that will not deteriorate in appearance in a short period of time that any other finish would.
The music room IS a music room. The worst dimension is square but rectangle will be ok. For rehearsals and a bit of recording , it will be ok. My experience is that to have a bullet proof bunker is pure overkill for the majority of what I do.
Naturally it will have some treatment. The walls will be 75mm aac blocks with a 50mm foam insert, double glazed doors and windows.
Power float is something I will try to factor in.
Yes the roof will be tanked. I have a bit of experience in doing it well after I paid good money to do a s**t job on a previous house!
Funny how two coats of membrane was deemed acceptable only to fail after one year, sheesh.
The deck has to be able to support the weight of 200mm soil but also water on a down pour.
I am looking along the lines of fibre mesh membrane sandwich. Foam layer to protect the membrane, plastic sheet over . Drainage material ( crushed rock) and possible soil on top. Maybe , I will come up with another idea.
If I am going to build, it has to be functional, durable and something I am happy to look at for a long time.
Yes I think I am ambitious, but it's added a few years to my life. It's a something I have always been interested in but never got to explore fully, ie no money, lol
The rooms are all relatively generous but the whole house isn't really that big.
As for stairs, I have all the formulas for stringers and risers covered ( to australian standards). The stair case also has a generous width. Makes it easy to carry all that music gear upstairs for a " beatles reunion, " lol.
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Re: Building in chiang mai

Postby Andyfteeze » Thu Oct 09, 2014 12:49 pm

I hear what you say about the heat being there most of the year, but the terrazzo is meant to be an open area. Many nights are cool and it will be a great place to watch tv, chill out when it is cool. The roofed area will act like shade ( with foil underneath, lol). Just like a Sala. The concrete will be well insulated so it won't feel like an oven when the sun goes down.This incorporates a few ideas from thai living as well as Mediterranean ideas. It's a uniform design that incorporates the best of both worlds. The engineer who is doing all the drawings is pretty well upto date in his ideas which helps.
As for the slab, it's not that hard to deviate from post hole to trench. I don't think they are that thick! Maybe the guys who have had issues picked the wrong tradesmen. It's not as if i am doing something they have never done, it's the same same only different. How do they do the beams between postholes? Same way to trench for stiffened slab. Anyway , I will be there in case.
But for sure, this is the most expensive part of the build. I will be looking for competent concreters with commercial experience.. I estimate that the concrete alone is between 450,000 to 750,000 baht. Double glazed windows and doors, another 250,000 baht. Aac blocks, only 50,000 baht. Goes down hill from there, hahahaha
I will post the final layout with measurements when they are ready.
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Re: Building in chiang mai

Postby Andyfteeze » Thu Oct 09, 2014 1:07 pm

Problems with bathrooms? I don't understand what you mean. Downstairs bathroom and kitchen are 300-400mm off the ground, so I am not sure what problems you mean. Plumbing is one of those things I am not in a hurry to worry about yet, it will be incorporated where necessary, but if there is something I don't see, please share.
If you mean pipes through the concrete, that's not an issue when done right. All pipes through slabs have to be "lagged" so there is some give if any movement occurs. That's what I have been shown by old timers. I have also allowed a services riser on the outside of the staircase? This makes the house not look so boxy.
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Re: Building in chiang mai

Postby Mike Judd » Thu Oct 09, 2014 1:47 pm

Well you explained why all those Bathrooms, you will have to allow for a reasonable amount of room under in a false ceiling for all the S traps and runs of 100m.m. pipes linking up before going to your septics etc; though. Other wise not a problem with a bit of foam wrapped around the temporary pipe when concreting, the only critical measurement being the W.C. from the final wall surface. Seeing as you are set on a roof garden ,and you are aware of the waterproofing needed, the only thing I would recommend after seeing countless slabs poured off the ground ,ending up with the water pooling at the opposite end to the drain outlet. Do what I did on my own concrete deck on top of my office here in Sydney, I put the edge formwork on one side 50m.m. higher than the other side where the drains were going, then at least water runs off as you want. Power float the concrete or at least steel trowel finish, a good membrane has Fibreglass in it which should last a long time if put down with heat, unless you go for the paint on ones which there are several. But as I said, a proper fall in the concrete is a good beginning.
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Re: Building in chiang mai

Postby Andyfteeze » Thu Oct 09, 2014 2:30 pm

Thanks mike.
In my last project I used K10 and rolls and rolls of fibreglass fly screen to make one very very tough water barrier. I am just thinking of how to allow for expansion and contraction over such a. Large area. But if it's well insulated from the elements, this may not be a big issue ( maybe in my mind).
As to the fall of all the pies, yes I am thinking carefully about the issue now. I tried to keep everything around one area upstairs, but it's obviously now two areas due to room layouts. Just occured to me, can I do the septic tank in the 2m between house and side wall? This could minimise the issue
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Re: Building in chiang mai

Postby Roger Ramjet » Thu Oct 09, 2014 5:31 pm

Andyfteeze wrote:can I do the septic tank in the 2m between house and side wall? This could minimise the issue

Yes I have two large septic tanks in my two metre gap from house to wall. It's not a problem unless you build the wall first.
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Re: Building in chiang mai

Postby Andyfteeze » Thu Oct 09, 2014 11:20 pm

Funny you should say that, i am building the wall first ! Lol
Lucky i am getting a shovel delivered. Hahaha
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Re: Building in chiang mai

Postby Roger Ramjet » Thu Oct 09, 2014 11:57 pm

Andyfteeze wrote:Funny you should say that, i am building the wall first ! Lol
Lucky i am getting a shovel delivered. Hahaha

Why don't you get the backhoe to dig the holes when he's doing the footings?
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Re: Building in chiang mai

Postby Andyfteeze » Sat Oct 11, 2014 8:23 am

Using the shovel was a joke, lol
Of coarse i will take advantage of the backhoe !
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Re: Building in chiang mai

Postby Mike Judd » Sat Oct 11, 2014 11:33 am

Don't make my silly mistake with the Septic tank ( Page 10 in Slow build) although it was half full and I didn't plan on the sky opening up in the middle of the operation. Get it in position and fill the bloody thing up with water as soon as possible. :oops: :oops:
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Re: Building in chiang mai

Postby Andyfteeze » Sat Nov 22, 2014 9:05 pm

Ok latest updates.

Just collected plans, four copies. 16,000b. All up. All electrical, plumbing, structural
I looked at the plans and initially found footings instead of beams. I didnt look close enough.
I initially queeried why he didnt just do as i requested with the stiffened slab. After some hand gestures and translater, he pointed out to me that what he had designed was better. It combined both thai (footings) and australian stiffened slab. He politely told me that thais would build 5 storeys on my foundations, lol.

Monday we start the fence. Technically , the fence plans need to be ticked off before we start, but we have been assured that when we submit the application there will be no issues. All documentation has been provided and plans approved. So we go and get the rubber stamp sorted on monday as the fence guy starts.
And my wife starts the buying process chasing all her contacts for material. I am not going with her because i dont want falang special pricing, thank you. And yes, they do add somewhat to their margin when they see me, but two can play that game. The plans initially were quoted 30,000b. Things are tight so prices should reflect the market . Use a thai negotiator.
Mine is priceless :D
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