Dogs 101

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Dogs 101

Postby pattayapope » Wed May 02, 2012 6:49 am

<Several posts moved from original location viewtopic.php?f=30&t=2019 - mod>

sirineou wrote:Some one pointed out to me that beagles are not the brightest dogs around, in fact of all hundreds of breeds they rank in the bottom 10. Not a great surprise to me.


Don't say that I have already got one with another on order[*] :roll:
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Re: My Story of a Koi Pond

Postby MGV12 » Wed May 02, 2012 6:52 am

pattayapope wrote:
sirineou wrote:Some one pointed out to me that beagles are not the brightest dogs around, in fact of all hundreds of breeds they rank in the bottom 10. Not a great surprise to me.


Don't say that I have already got one with another on order[*] :roll:


Good luck with the training PP :roll:

http://www.petmedsonline.org/least-inte ... -dogs.html

BkkBill amongst others [like Tiga for instance] will be pleased with this list:

http://www.petmedsonline.org/top-10-sma ... world.html

Didn't notice those JR's on either list ... middle of the road dog I guess :lol:

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Re: My Story of a Koi Pond

Postby BKKBILL » Wed May 02, 2012 7:50 am

Seems your Golden Retriever is in the top ten. JR's missed the test as they were all out riding in cars or ranked below Koi. :wink:
 
The Intelligence of Dogs – The LIST

According to S. Coren, author of “The Intelligence of Dogs”, there are three types of dog intelligence:
Adaptive Intelligence (learning and problem-solving ability). This is specific to the individual animal and is measured by canine IQ tests.
Instinctive Intelligence. This is specific to the individual animal and is measured by canine IQ tests.
Working/Obedience Intelligence. This is breed dependent.

Methodology

The author used “understanding of new commands” and “obey first command” as his standards of intelligence. He surveyed dog trainers and compiled this list of dog intelligence. While this method of ordering dog intelligence is acceptable for training and working with dogs, it does not apply to the genetic intelligence which can be measured by ingenuity and understanding of common situations.[5] The drawback of this rating scale, by the author’s own admission, is that it is heavily weighted towards obedience related behavioural traits (e.g. working or guard dogs), rather than understanding or creativity (e.g. hunting dogs).
As a result, some breeds may appear lower on the list due to their stubborn or independent nature, but this nature does not make them unintelligent or impossible to train. The book includes other sections on hunting and other intelligence types, as well a general IQ test that owners can perform on their dogs; that test is better weighted for ingenuity and independent problem solving, but rankings were provided only for working intelligence, and are listed below.

 1–10 Brightest Dogs
11–26 Excellent Working Dogs
27–39 Above Average Working Dogs
40–54 Average Working/Obedience Intelligence
55–69 Fair Working/Obedience Intelligence
70–79 Lowest Degree of Working/Obedience Intelligence

Ranking of dogs by breed

Brightest Dogs
Understanding of New Commands: Fewer than 5 repetitions. Obey First Command: 95% of the time or better.
. Border Collie
. Poodle
. German Shepherd
. Golden Retriever
. Doberman Pinscher
. Shetland Sheepdog
. Labrador Retriever
. Papillon
. Rottweiler
. Australian Cattle Dog

Excellent Working Dogs
Understanding of New Commands: 5 to 15 repetitions. Obey First Command: 85% of the time or better.
. Pembroke Welsh Corgi
. Miniature Schnauzer
. English Springer Spaniel
. Belgian Shepherd Tervuren
. Schipperke
Belgian Sheepdog
. Collie
Keeshond
. German Shorthaired Pointer
. Flat-Coated Retriever
English Cocker Spaniel
Standard Schnauzer
. Brittany
. Cocker Spaniel
. Weimaraner
. Belgian Malinois
Bernese Mountain Dog
. Pomeranian
. Irish Water Spaniel
. Vizsla
. Cardigan Welsh Corgi

Above Average Working Dogs
Understanding of New Commands: 15 to 25 repetitions. Obey First Command: 70% of the time or better
. Chesapeake Bay Retriever
Puli
Yorkshire Terrier
. Giant Schnauzer
. Airedale Terrier
Bouvier des Flandres
. Border Terrier
Briard
. Welsh Springer Spaniel
. Manchester Terrier
. Samoyed
. Field Spaniel
Newfoundland
Australian Terrier
American Staffordshire Terrier
Gordon Setter
Bearded Collie
. Cairn Terrier
Kerry Blue Terrier
Irish Setter
. Norwegian Elkhound
. Affenpinscher
Silky Terrier
Miniature Pinscher
English Setter
Pharaoh Hound
Clumber Spaniel
. Norwich Terrier
. Dalmatian

Average Working/Obedience Intelligence
Understanding of New Commands: 25 to 40 repetitions. Obey First Command: 50% of the time or better.
. Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier
Bedlington Terrier
Fox Terrier (Smooth)
. Curly Coated Retriever
Irish Wolfhound
. Kuvasz
Australian Shepherd
. Saluki
Finnish Spitz
Pointer
. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
German Wirehaired Pointer
Black and Tan Coonhound
American Water Spaniel
. Siberian Husky
Bichon Frise
English Toy Spaniel
. Tibetan Spaniel
English Foxhound
Otterhound
American Foxhound
Greyhound
Wirehaired Pointing Griffon
. West Highland White Terrier
Scottish Deerhound
. Boxer
Great Dane
. Dachshund
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
. Alaskan Malamute
. Whippet
Chinese Shar Pei
Wire Fox Terrier
. Rhodesian Ridgeback
. Ibizan Hound
Welsh Terrier
Irish Terrier
. Boston Terrier
Akita

Fair Working/Obedience Intelligence
Understanding of New Commands: 40 to 80 repetitions. Obey First Command: 30% of the time or better.
. Skye Terrier
. Norfolk Terrier
Sealyham Terrier
. Pug
. French Bulldog
. Brussels Griffon
Maltese
. Italian Greyhound
. Chinese Crested
. Dandie Dinmont Terrier
Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen
Tibetan Terrier
Japanese Chin
Lakeland Terrier
. Old English Sheepdog
. Great Pyrenees
. Scottish Terrier
Saint Bernard
. Bull Terrier
. Chihuahua
. Lhasa Apso
. Bullmastiff

Lowest Degree of Working/Obedience Intelligence
Understanding of New Commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more. Obey First Command: 25% of the time or worse.
. Shih Tzu
. Basset Hound
. Mastiff
. Beagle
. Pekingese
. Bloodhound
. Borzoi
. Chow Chow
. Bulldog
. Basenji
. Afghan Hound
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Re: My Story of a Koi Pond

Postby geordie » Wed May 02, 2012 8:39 am

Possible that JR,s are still categorized as mongrels not as a pedigree
I would put them as highly inteligent to the point of too bloody clever but also wilful to their own ends if they get a scent of something they will blatantly ignore any and all comands my little darlings have come up with a new trick turning the aircon on themselve,s a couple of times so the remote is no longer left on the coffee table same with the tv again the remote is out of reach it came to light because we were going to be out longer than expected and asked her sister to tur the air con on !! she called back to inform us the dogs had already done so an were watching the tv :( accident or deliberate ?? but its happened 3 times only once with both
my comments may be wrong but never deliberately
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Re: My Story of a Koi Pond

Postby fredlk » Wed May 02, 2012 8:50 am

geordie wrote:the dogs had already done so an were watching the tv

That's why I won't be installing regular tv. I want them to be out and about playing in the fields and not become fat couch potatoes like their English cousins.
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Re: My Story of a Koi Pond

Postby BKKBILL » Wed May 02, 2012 10:18 am

geordie wrote:Possible that JR,s are still categorized as mongrels not as a pedigree
I would put them as highly inteligent to the point of too bloody clever but also wilful to their own ends if they get a scent of something they will blatantly ignore any and all comands my little darlings have come up with a new trick turning the aircon on themselve,s a couple of times so the remote is no longer left on the coffee table same with the tv again the remote is out of reach it came to light because we were going to be out longer than expected and asked her sister to tur the air con on !! she called back to inform us the dogs had already done so an were watching the tv :( accident or deliberate ?? but its happened 3 times only once with both

Right you are geordie.

Intelligent dogs are inadvertently taught many unwanted behaviors. Increasing the activity level in a household, and increasing the number of people that are present in it, increases the likelihood that chance associations will be learned. For the intelligent dog this means that there is a greater opportunity to learn things that will be useful in adapting to everyday life, but also provides a greater opportunity for the dog to learn "odd" or annoying associations. Consider the case of "Prince", a Border Collie whose great joy in life was to race around outdoors. Whenever someone was about to leave the house Prince would race after them, trying to get outside. Once, after Prince had started his mad dash for the exit, the screen door swung closed and the dog ended up crashing through the wire mesh. Rewarded by the chance to romp outside, the dog learned from this one instance that it could create its own "doggie door" by simply running full tilt at the screen. After several repairs had been attempted, Prince's owners added a protective layer of heavy farm wire that the dog could not break through. Frustrated by this new development Prince began casting around the house and noticed that many of the windows were open and only covered by the same material that used to cover the screen door. For this intelligent dog it was easy to reach the conclusion that these windows could also be used as exits.

Instantaneously, every open ground floor window then became a target Prince's headlong rush for the joys of the outdoors, much to the dismay and annoyance of the dog's owners. A less intelligent dog would have been considerably less likely to form the association that crashing through the screen results in outdoor time, based upon a single instance. Furthermore, when confronted with the obstacle of the heavy wire over the door screen, the less intelligent dog would have been considerably less likely to generalize its knowledge and apply its newly learned information to windows or other screened apertures. Simply put, the less intelligent dog will miss many of these chance contingencies and hence will move through the noise and chaos of a busy household without learning bad habits from only one or two associations.
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Re: My Story of a Koi Pond

Postby MGV12 » Wed May 02, 2012 11:55 am

BKKBILL wrote:
Lowest Degree of Working/Obedience Intelligence
Understanding of New Commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more. Obey First Command: 25% of the time or worse.
. Shih Tzu
. Basset Hound
. Mastiff
. Beagle
. Pekingese
. Bloodhound
. Borzoi
. Chow Chow
. Bulldog
. Basenji
. Afghan Hound


I always thought there were some similarities between Afghan Hounds and catwalk models.

"An octopus' intelligence compared to the dog...

Their intelligence...im sure is something many of you are already aware of and of course they are very intelligent when it comes to behavior. While reading a book I own called "Octopus and Squid: The Soft Intelligence" which you guys probably might have heard of or even own, the author Jacques-Yves Cousteau reveals some rare...and very interesting information based on personal experiences with these creatures. Even though I read this book, some stuff had caught my attention that isn't commonly studied or at least...put out in the media.

One of them was the author's comparison between a dog's intelligence and an octopus' intelligence. I was soo happy to actually see this because my older friend had recently argued with me that Dogs are a lot more intelligent than an octopus. However, it seems the other way around in certain circumstances.

Taken from the book:

"When one thinks of how long it takes to teach a dog something as simple as sitting up or shaking hands, one must admit that an octopus learns very quickly; and that above all, it teaches itself. We did not show it what to do. With a dog, it takes months of patient work before the animal will do what one wants it to do. The difference between a dog learning and an octopus learning is the difference between training an animal and allowing an animal to exorcise its intelligence in determining the means to be used to overcome an obstacle in certain circumstances."


Another quick interesting observation was an octopus "thought" to be having "respect for the dead."? The divers found a dead octopus corpse partially crushed at the bottom of the sea floor which had turned white. They decided to see what would happen if it were to be taken to a hole at another octopus' den.

"The octopus immediately came out of its hole, took the corpse, and carried it to a spot twenty-five or thirty feet away. Then, it returned to its house. Why did it do this? We do not know. We would have thought that it might eat the remains of the dead octopus-which is what generally happens when an octopus is killed in a fight. In the behavior of octopuses, their are subtleties which escape our understanding. It seems a bit far-fetched to speak of 'respect for the dead' among octopuses. It is more likely that given the octopus' highly developed senses of taste and smell, and its sensitivity to chemical emanations, it finds a corpse somehow 'disagreeable.' Even in this context, however, the octopus' behavior is suprising. The almost human act of picking up the offending corpse to carry it away from the octopus' house presupposes a series of thoughts and judgments of which few animals are capable."

Source -- http://www.tonmo.com/forums/showthread. ... to-the-dog

There was a Discovery Channel programme on a while back where they set a number of IQ tests ... quite remarkable how the octopus overcame problems to get to its food. Shame I can't find a link to it. Maybe one for the pond ... except that it probably would enjoy the taste of Koi.

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Re: My Story of a Koi Pond

Postby BKKBILL » Wed May 02, 2012 1:42 pm

Just one more:

Can an octopus guard your bike like this Golden Retriever? I think it’s on topic as the guy has a Koi in the bikes front basket.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ... SNMlVQpkbE
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Dogs 101

Postby MGV12 » Wed May 02, 2012 2:21 pm

BKKBILL wrote:Just one more:

Can an octopus guard your bike like this Golden Retriever? I think it’s on topic as the guy has a Koi in the bikes front basket.


Wow Tiga ... we got a lot of training to do! Sit ... I said sit!

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Dogs 101

Postby MGV12 » Fri May 04, 2012 11:26 am

pattayapope wrote:
sirineou wrote:Some one pointed out to me that beagles are not the brightest dogs around, in fact of all hundreds of breeds they rank in the bottom 10. Not a great surprise to me.


Don't say that I have already got one with another on order[*] :roll:


This does suggest they aren't the sharpest tool in the box ... who ever said that Rottweilers are aggressive?

[no responses on that issue please ... I realise it's all about training]



Just as well really......


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Dogs 101

Postby MGV12 » Fri May 11, 2012 10:08 am

This thread is now about anything dog ... there is another thread on security issues viewtopic.php?f=21&t=162&hilit=dogs+guns

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Re: Dogs 101

Postby fredlk » Fri May 11, 2012 10:22 am

MGV12 wrote:This thread is now about anything dog ... there is another thread on security issues

Two of my security guards doing what security guards do best:
Eddy & Patsy.png
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Re: Dogs 101

Postby MGV12 » Fri May 11, 2012 10:26 am

What Does Your Dog Breed Say About You?

By Nicole Pajer

From a Chihuahua to a Great Dane, dogs come in all sorts of shapes and sizes and display an array of temperaments. Studies suggest that the type of dog breed that you choose can tell a lot about your personality. The following are a few generalizations about what owning a certain breed says about your personality. How similar to your dog breed do you think you are?
Bulldogs

Bulldogs are determined, persistent, and do not give up easily. People who own bulldogs are said to be silly and love to laugh but can be viewed as stubborn at times. They are extremely efficient and methodical in completing tasks. While they appear intimidating, bulldogs are gentle and loving members of the family known for being hopeless romantics with sentimental streaks.
Terriers

Terriers are energetic, fun loving, and playful companions. People who own terriers are said to be flexible and able to focus on the task at hand. Just like the dogs, terrier owners are often feisty, brave, and competitive. They are extremely talkative and have good sense of humor.
Labradors and Golden Retrievers

Labs and golden retrievers are friendly, good-natured, and make wonderful family pets. Owners of these breeds put their families first and said to be easy going and carefree. Labs and goldens are known for having an active lifestyle and loving the outdoors. People who own these breeds are social butterflies who are honest and lovable.
Beagles

Beagles are inquisitive, loyal, and willing to learn new things. Owners of Beagles tend to be open to new experiences, curious, and willful. Beagle owners make great friends and bring laughter and joy to everyone’s lives. They can also have a mischievous side.

Poodles, Chihuahuas and Toy Breeds
Owners of these breeds are sincere, fun loving, and loyal. Toy breed owners are said to love traveling since the small dogs make excellent travel partners and can be easily put into a carrier. Owners of these dogs take pride in their appearance, are very neat and keep very orderly homes. They are very versatile and can enjoy evenings in with a bottle of wine or a night out partying on the town.

Boxers
Boxers are busy dogs that exude high amounts of energy. People that own boxers are said to live life to the fullest and are known to be extremely playful. Boxer owners are busy, love life, and quickly welcome strangers as new friends. Boxers banish stress with their silly and playful demeanor and their owners are generally happy-go-lucky people.

Cocker Spaniels
Cocker Spaniels are sweet, respectful, and gentle. Owners of this breed are charming, trustworthy, and affectionate. Cocker Spaniel owners are said to lead busy lives but put spending time with their family first. They maintain a group of close lifelong friends, which they much prefer to spending time with strangers.

English Pointers, Weimaraners, Irish Setters
These breeds are naturally alert, likable, and well-rounded companions. Owners of these breeds enjoy being active, outdoor activities, and hunting. They have a great sense of courage, are highly intelligent, easily excited, and motivated. These breeds are very energetic and their owners enjoy intense activities such as all day hiking and extreme sports. They can get bored easily if not subjected to new experiences.

Greyhound, Whippet, Basenji (Sight Hound Group)
Owners of these breeds tend to be more relaxed, calm, and introverted. Sight hounds enjoy the company of close groups of friends and prefer social outings with small groups. They are highly organized, curious, and always alert. People who own sight hounds are fast and agile and often excel at sports, especially track and field.

German Shepherds
German shepherds are sometimes shy around strangers but warm up once they get to know you. Owners of German shepherds would do anything for their friends and make extremely loyal companions that are protective of those that they love.

Dachshunds
Dachshunds are stubborn and brave, often acting as if invincible. When owners of dachshunds want something, they don’t give up until they get it. Dachshund owners love gardening and just like the dogs, digging up things. They can sometimes be bossy and often dislike not getting their own way.

Rottweilers
Rottweilers are determined and are often described as intense. This breed commands a certain amount of respect and is considered to be a courageous breed. People that have rottweilers are confident and are loyal and devoted to their friends and loved ones. They are laid back but quick to react if someone rubs them the wrong way.

Pugs
Pugs are often viewed as the “class clowns” of the canine species. People who live with pugs are cheerful and have a zest for living life to the fullest. Just like pugs who will do anything for a good belly rub, their owners enjoy frequent massages and days of pampering at the spa.

Doberman Pinschers
These dogs are very serious, intense, and determined. Owners are leaders versus followers and love to plan and organize a situation. People who live with dobermans are said to be very organized and go about achieving their goals in a polite yet firm fashion.

Siberian Huskies
Siberian husky owners are huge sports fans. Whether it’s Monday Night Football or college basketball, it’s likely that they are out watching the game somewhere or within the comfort of their own home. Owners of huskies enjoy skiing, snowboarding, and outdoor sports. They can be strong willed but are lovable and welcoming to strangers.

Great Danes
Owners of Great danes are good-hearted and responsible. They tend to work hard and put one hundred percent into everything they do. Great dane owners enjoy staying up on news and current events and welcome the chance to debate important issues with others. This breed tends to be serious and enjoys relaxing around the house after the workday is done.

Bichon Frises
People who own bichons enjoy being pampered and are considerate of their appearance. Bichons are naturally sociable and are the happiest when they are part of a family or among a group of friends. Bichon owners are self-assured and gravitate towards a classy lifestyle. They are often wine connoisseurs and art aficionados who enjoy dining at 4-star restaurants and being seen around the town.

Australian Shepherds
Australian shepherds are active and thoroughly enjoy being outside. Owners of this breed enjoy playing Frisbee at the beach, going to the park, and camping outdoors. This breed has a passion for living life to the fullest and people who live with Australian shepherds are said to have a lot of friends. Aussie owners can be competitive, especially when it comes to a sports match.

Pit Bulls
Pit bulls have a strong desire to please and will do anything for their family or friends. Pit bull owners are courageous, full of vitality, and are constantly looking out for those they love. They enjoy being around children and make excellent parents and grandparents. There is no better babysitter than a pit bull.
Mixed Breeds

Mutt owners are fun loving, open minded, and carefree. They enjoy coasting along and riding the wave of life over following strict and rigid plans. They don’t sweat the small stuff and keep their eye on the bigger picture. In their spare time, mutt owners are often seen volunteering at or spending time with their diverse group of friends.

Source: http://www.cesarsway.com/dogbehavior/ba ... -About-You

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Re: Dogs 101

Postby MGV12 » Fri May 11, 2012 10:34 am

fredlk wrote:
MGV12 wrote:This thread is now about anything dog ... there is another thread on security issues

Two of my security guards doing what security guards do best:


I have one of those ... sleeping guard dogs that is.

Mind you ... 5 secs later he was out protecting me by yapping at a bird or falling leaf or something :)

Guarding.jpg
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Re: Dogs 101

Postby fredlk » Fri May 11, 2012 10:36 am

MGV12 wrote:What Does Your Dog Breed Say About You?

Terriers
Terriers are energetic, fun loving, and playful companions. People who own terriers are said to be flexible and able to focus on the task at hand. Just like the dogs, terrier owners are often feisty, brave, and competitive. They are extremely talkative and have good sense of humor.

Me to a T.
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