Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

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Re: Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

Postby BKKBILL » Wed Mar 05, 2014 10:05 am

So who do you go after since these ether storage facilities not banks have no resources or assets.
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Re: Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

Postby MGV12 » Thu Mar 06, 2014 7:15 pm

No surprise here .......

"Their conclusion: the movement of coins they investigated did not square with the explanation given by Mt. Gox that the exchange lost its coins to a malleability attack. Says Aquentin of their findings: "They show that at the very least we have not been told the whole truth.""

Insight - Online sleuthing by Mt. Gox dispossessed throws up few clues

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/03/0 ... 9M20140306

Beggars belief ...........

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2105280/ ... osion.html

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Re: Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

Postby BKKBILL » Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:55 pm

Canadian police investigating after bitcoin bank Flexcoin folds

Wed, Mar 5 2014

VANCOUVER/TORONTO (Reuters) - Canadian police have launched an investigation after online bitcoin bank Flexcoin, which closed its virtual doors this week, said that it had lost about $600,000 worth of the digital currency in a hacker attack.

The Edmonton, Alberta-based company reported the theft of 896 bitcoins on its website on Monday and said it "does not have the resources (or) assets ... to come back from this loss." It blamed the attack on hackers who had targeted its online wallet.

Bitcoins stored in Flexcoin's cold storage facility, which is basically an offline bank, were not affected by the hack and will be returned to customers, the company said.

The Edmonton Police Service (EPS) said on Wednesday they were investigating the issue.

"I can confirm that detectives from the EPS Economic Crimes Section and Technological Crimes Unit are following up with Flexcoin, and the matter is currently under investigation," said police spokesman Chad Orydzuk.

Flexcoin's demise comes close on the heels of the collapse of Mt. Gox, once the world's dominant bitcoin exchange, which filed for bankruptcy last week after it said it had lost some 850,000 bitcoins.

Bitcoin is a digital currency that is bought and sold on a peer-to-peer network, independent of any central bank or government. Its value soared last year, and the total worth of bitcoins minted is now about $7 billion.

Flexcoin had earlier on Wednesday complained that local authorities were not taking the theft seriously, Tweeting: "My attempts to file a police report were laughed at, I was advised #bitcoin is a scam." But it later Tweeted that it had been in touch with police and would provide more information on Thursday.

While bitcoins are an unregulated currency, a hacker that breaks into a computer to steal bitcoins can be charged with unauthorized access to a computer and mischief to data.

LITTLE RECOURSE

Flexcoin users who lost bitcoins in the hack will likely have little recourse to recoup their funds, though one option may be a class action lawsuit like the one being considered against Mt. Gox, said Stuart Hoegner, a Toronto-based lawyer and general counsel for the Bitcoin Alliance of Canada.

"Short of a class action, people might find the burden of pursuing litigation to be something that's not very attractive," he said.

Another option might be through any potential bankruptcy proceedings for the company, though the outcome of either possibility would likely depend on the state of Flexcoin's books, said Hoegner.

Flexcoin was incorporated in Alberta in 2012 and registered to a rented mailbox in the city of Edmonton, according to provincial records. Its sole director and voting shareholder is James Andrew Gray, who also gave the rented mailbox as his address.

The corporate data did not include a phone number or other means of contacting Gray. He did not respond to queries sent to the Flexcoin Twitter account and the Flexcoin email address or efforts to reach him through social media.

An online forum posted on BitcoinTalk.org in March 2012 said Gray bought Flexcoin from U.S. firm Yooter Interactive Marketing.
Yooter posted a message on its website on Tuesday saying it had not had any contact with Flexcoin or Gray since the deal closed and had exited the bitcoin business entirely.

Flexcoin's website directed users who had lost funds to its terms of service, which state that the company will take every precaution to defend client bitcoins, but "is not responsible for insuring any bitcoins stored in the Flexcoin system."
It further states: "You agree to not hold Flexcoin Inc, or Flexcoin Inc's stakeholders, or Flexcoin Inc's shareholders liable for any lost bitcoins."

THE WILD WEST

The very public downfalls of Mt. Gox and Flexcoin come as bitcoin inches ever closer to the mainstream, with major online retailers like Overstock.com and TigerDirect.com now accepting the digital currency.

As more investors pile in, there's a strong case to be made for regulating crypto-currencies and virtual banks, said Jean-Paul Lam, associate professor of economics at the University of Waterloo, who said that in Canada, the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI) should step in.
"I think they will have to step in and try to regulate either the exchange of bitcoins or put an end to the trading of bitcoins," he said.

"The only solution to regulate the market is really to go in and say if you want to be treated like a currency, like a bank, then you're subject to the same regulations as the financial institutions of the land."

Canada's government said last month it will toughen rules targeting money laundering and terrorist financing to keep a closer eye on the use of bitcoin and other virtual currencies.


(Additional reporting by Louise Egan and Randall Palmer in Ottawa; Editing by Cynthia Osterman)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/03/ ... 3F20140306
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Re: Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

Postby sirineou » Fri Mar 07, 2014 12:28 am

Thought the incident might not be directly relayed to the Bitcoin industry, this is yet another bitcoin incident.
American CEO of Bitcoin Exchange Found Dead in Singapore
Per Liljas March 5, 2014

Yet another blow for the virtual currency

Autumn Radtke, the American CEO of Bitcoin exchange First Meta Exchange, has been found dead in her Singapore apartment.

Authorities are awaiting results of a toxicology report to ascertain the cause of death, but local media are already speculating that it could be a suicide.

“The First Meta team is shocked and saddened by the tragic loss of our friend and CEO Autumn Radtke,” said a statement on the company’s website.

The virtual currency Bitcoin has been stung by a series of ill-fated incidents lately, most notably the collapse of Japan’s leading Bitcoin exchange Mt Gox.
http://time.com/13563/american-ceo-of-bitcoin-exchange-found-dead-in-singapore/
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Re: Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

Postby MGV12 » Fri Mar 07, 2014 1:22 pm

No doubt influenced by high-profile recent 'happenings' with regard to Bitcoin et al.
The alleged creator, whom previously was described as an anonymous entity [amongst other descriptions], has been apparently identified but denies that he is who many claim he is .. or did what some claim he did ... and is indeed responsible in anyway shape or form ... even the suspicious form/scapegoat in which he is currently being portrayed. Unlikely that the facts will ever be in the public domain ... call AXN and ask if Sherlock is available .....
:roll:

Dorian Prentice Satoshi Nakamoto said Thursday that he is not the creator of bitcoin, adding further mystery to the story of how the world's most popular digital currency came to be.

The denial came after Newsweek published a 4,500-word cover story claiming Nakamoto is the person who wrote the computer code underpinnings of bitcoin.

In an exclusive two-hour interview with The Associated Press, Nakamoto, 64, denied he had anything to do with it and said he had never heard of bitcoin until his son told him he had been contacted by a Newsweek reporter three weeks ago.

Nakamoto acknowledged that many of the details in Newsweek's report are correct, including that he once worked for a defense contractor, and that his given name at birth was Satoshi. But he strongly disputed the magazine's assertion that he is "the face behind bitcoin."

"I got nothing to do with it," he said, repeatedly.

Newsweek stands by its story, which kicked off the relaunch of its print edition after 15 months and reorganization under new ownership.

Since bitcoin's birth in 2009, the currency's creator has remained a mystery. The person — or people — behind the digital currency's inception have been known only as "Satoshi Nakamoto," which many observers believed to be a pseudonym.

Bitcoin has become increasingly popular among tech enthusiasts, libertarians and risk-seeking investors because it allows people to make one-to-one transactions, buy goods and services and exchange money across borders without involving banks, credit card issuers or other third parties. Criminals like bitcoin for the same reasons.

For various technical reasons, it's hard to know just how many people worldwide own bitcoins, but the currency attracted outsize media attention and the fascination of millions as an increasing number of large retailers such as Overstock.com began to accept it.

Speculative investors have jumped into the bitcoin fray, too, sending the currency's value fluctuating wildly in recent months. In December, the value of a single bitcoin hit an all-time high of $1,200. It was around $665 on Thursday, according to the website bitcoincharts.com. Bloggers have speculated that bitcoin's creator is worth hundreds of millions of dollars in bitcoin.

After Newsweek posted the story on its website early Thursday, Nakamoto said his home was bombarded by phone calls. By mid-morning, a dozen reporters were waiting outside the modest two-story home on the residential street in Temple City, Calif., where he lives. He emerged shortly after noon saying he wanted to speak with one reporter only and asked for a "free lunch."

During a car ride and then later over sushi lunch at the AP bureau in downtown Los Angeles, Nakamoto spoke at length about his life, career and family, addressing many of the assertions in Newsweek's piece.

He also said a key portion of the piece — where he is quoted telling the reporter on his doorstep before two police officers, "I am no longer involved in that and I cannot discuss it" — was misunderstood.

Nakamoto said he is a native of Beppu, Japan who came to the U.S. as a child in 1959. He speaks both English and Japanese, but his English isn't flawless. Asked if he said the quote, Nakamoto responded, "no." "I'm saying I'm no longer in engineering. That's it," he said of the exchange. "And even if I was, when we get hired, you have to sign this document, contract saying you will not reveal anything we divulge during and after employment. So that's what I implied."

"It sounded like I was involved before with bitcoin and looked like I'm not involved now. That's not what I meant. I want to clarify that," he said.

Newsweek writer Leah McGrath Goodman, who spent two months researching the story, told the AP: "I stand completely by my exchange with Mr. Nakamoto. There was no confusion whatsoever about the context of our conversation —and his acknowledgment of his involvement in bitcoin."

The magazine pulled together its thesis on the creator's identity by matching Nakamoto's name, educational history, career, anti-government bent and writing style to the alleged creator of bitcoin. It also quoted Nakamoto's estranged wife and other family members who said they weren't sure he is the creator.

Several times during the interview with AP, Nakamoto mistakenly referred to the currency as "bitcom," and as a single company, which it is not. He said he's never heard of Gavin Andresen, a leading bitcoin developer who told Newsweek he'd worked closely with the person or entity known as "Satoshi Nakamoto" in developing the system, but that they never met in person or spoke on the phone.

When shown the original bitcoin proposal that Newsweek linked to in its story, Nakamoto said he didn't write it, and said the email address in the document wasn't his.

"Peer-to-peer can be anything," he said. "That's just a matter of address. What the hell? It doesn't make sense to me."

Asked if he was technically able to come up with the idea for bitcoin, Nakamoto responded: "Capability? Yes, but any programmer could do that."

The nearest Nakamoto has come to working on a financial system, he said, was a project for Citibank with a company called Quotron, which provided real-time stock prices to brokerage firms. Nakamoto said he worked on the software side for about four years starting in 1987.

"That had nothing to do with skipping financial institutions," he said.

Nakamoto said he believes someone either came up with the name or specifically targeted him to be the fall guy for the currency's creation.

He also said he doesn't discuss his career because in many cases, his work was confidential. When he was employed by Hughes Aircraft starting around 1973, he worked on missile systems for the U.S. Navy and Air Force.

He said he also worked for the Federal Aviation Administration starting around 1999, but was laid off following the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.

Getting hired by a military contractor was the reason he applied for and received American citizenship. He decided around that time to change his name, adding "Dorian Prentice" to Satoshi Nakamoto, partly to sound more Western. He said he picked "Dorian" because he says it meant "a man of simplicity" and referred to the ancient Greek people. "Prentice" alluded to his affinity for learning, he said.

As he pored over the Newsweek story with a reporter, Nakamoto repeatedly said "oh jeez," as he read private details about himself, quotes from family members and even specifics from his medical history.

"How long is this media hoopla going to last?" he said.

http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireSt ... 811029#top

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Re: Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

Postby MGV12 » Fri Mar 21, 2014 3:56 pm

NBC won’t recognise bitcoin
Fri, 21 March 2014
Eddie Morton

Cambodia's central bank won’t recognise bitcoin as a form of payment, making the Kingdom the latest Asian country to reject the digital currency.

National Bank of Cambodia director-general Chea Serey confirmed the regulator’s stance on the issue on Wednesday, citing the absence of any e-commerce law in the Kingdom as one of the main reasons.

“NBC will not recognise a currency that is not issued or backed by a government. Bitcoin’s issuer is not a central bank of any jurisdiction,” Serey said.

Serey said that the lack of pertinent regulations means consumers aren’t legally protected in case of fraud, “which has proven to be a daily occurrence in the virtual world”, she added.

The NBC is the only organisation in Cambodia with authorisation to issue legal tender under the direction of the Ministry of Economy and Finance.

http://www.phnompenhpost.com/business/n ... se-bitcoin

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Re: Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

Postby MGV12 » Fri Mar 21, 2014 5:49 pm

Maybe they should try looking down the back of the sofa as well :P

MtGox finds 200,000 missing bitcoins in old wallet

Bankrupt Japanese firm MtGox said in a filing that it has found 200,000 lost bitcoins.

The firm said it found the bitcoins - worth around $116m (£70m) - in an old digital wallet from 2011.

That brings the total number of bitcoins the firm lost down to 650,000 from 850,000.

MtGox, formerly the world's largest bitcoin exchange, filed for bankruptcy in February, after it said it lost thousands of bitcoins to hackers.

"MtGox had certain old-format wallets which were used in the past and which, MtGox thought, no longer held any bitcoins," said Mt Gox chief executive Mark Karpeles in the filing.

However, "on March 7, 2014, MtGox confirmed that an old-format wallet which was used prior to June 2011 held a balance of approximately 200,000 bitcoins," he said.

Mr Karpeles said the firm moved the found bitcoins to offline wallets on 14 and 15 March so that they could not be targeted.

At the time of the MtGox theft, about 750,000 customer bitcoins were stolen as well as close to 100,000 of MtGox's own bitcoins.

That amounts to about 7% of all the bitcoins in existence.

MtGox recently won brief bankruptcy protection in the US as the firm's case works its way through Japanese courts.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-26677291

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Re: Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

Postby MGV12 » Wed Apr 02, 2014 12:50 pm

The value of Bitcoin may be volatile but it seems more and more companies are willing to deal in them:

bitcointalk.org.jpg


https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=378936.0
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Re: Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

Postby MGV12 » Sat Aug 23, 2014 2:12 pm

Either a 'Gravy Train' you should be riding or the most effective scam/marketing ploy of the 21st Century to date.

Bitcoin heads North .. but will that be true north or will 'market forces' ensure that it will soon revert to heading south?:


From Gold Rush to Arms Race: Why Bitcoin Mining is Heading North

The face of industrial-scale bitcoin mining is changing with every passing month, having already pushed far beyond the bounds once envisioned, perhaps, by the hobby miners of four years ago.

The landscape is much different now. Many large-scale mines are shifting from warehouse set-ups to data centers better equipped to deliver the massive power and cooling resources necessary to compete in a steadily accelerating industry.

http://www.coindesk.com/gold-rush-arms- ... ing-north/

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Re: Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

Postby Roger Ramjet » Sat Aug 23, 2014 2:28 pm

And for all the doomsayers out there: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-08-21/bitcoin/5688086
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Re: Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

Postby sirineou » Mon Aug 25, 2014 1:31 am

Roger Ramjet wrote:And for all the doomsayers out there: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-08-21/bitcoin/5688086

Next time I am in Canberra I will change my doomsayer attitude toward Bit coin, in the mean time
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Re: Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

Postby Roger Ramjet » Mon Aug 25, 2014 7:11 am

sirineou wrote:Next time I am in Canberra I will change my doomsayer attitude toward Bit coin, in the mean time

Ah, but there is a catch, you must have a "swipe and go", or local bank card on you, or a tablet that will talk to the ATM machine (not secure enough) or a laptop (very secure depending on password), that will accept the bitcoins if you are buying and store them.... much the same as selling because who can remember a twenty or thirty digit number.
All banks in Australia will transact through bitcoin and they still demand a "conversion fee' even though it is done by a computer. Which raises the biggest rort of all times with Visa and Mastercard all charging a "conversion fee" when items are bought in say, Thai baht to dollars or visa versa when a computer does it instantly. There are a couple of banks here that have EFPOS machines in stores that do it instantly....HomePro is one, Bumrungrad is another, where the "converting bank", normally Bangkok Bank makes their "fees" from low conversion rates, whilst the card that belongs to the "foreign bank/owner" makes nothing. Which raises the question: Why hasn't that rort by banks been been fixed? Or are we paying for their computers too? I won't even delve into how much Visa and Mastercard take as "commission" off the top.
I should let my gaming computer mine bitcoin in the background when I start it up. It must cost me 1,000 baht a month in the electricity it uses at 600 watts.
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Re: Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

Postby fredlk » Mon Aug 25, 2014 8:51 am

Roger Ramjet wrote:Which raises the question: Why hasn't that rort by banks been been fixed? Or are we paying for their computers too?

The answer is yes and much more besides. As a long-time retiree and ex-employee of a bank I am still profiting generously from having worked there (physically) for a mere 9 years. Banks are thieves, but they do it to pay their staff who if they get their sums right can do really well. I found that out quite by accident and while working for a bank was a bad experience, I'm still being paid generously for my time there.

Ever heard of Faust? :lol:
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Re: Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

Postby MGV12 » Fri Sep 12, 2014 10:28 am

Banking on bitcoin? Why many more may do so soon

Average UK bank customers may not be using the fast-growing internet currency bitcoin just yet, but as CNBC's UK Business Editor Helia Ebrahimi reports, authorities would do well to take it seriously.

It's no longer possible to dismiss bitcoin as a wet dream for techies or anarchists when one of the world's leading central banks has decided to take it seriously.

Having monitored developments in the world of bitcoin for a year, the Bank of England has now delivered its verdict on a currency that was only created five years ago.

When I spoke exclusively to the Bank's Chief Cashier, Victoria Cleland, she was keen to say the Bank doesn't want to dismiss bitcoin. It is watching how it develops and wants to be seen to be taking it seriously.

Perhaps she has a vested interest in keeping an eye on this rival currency. As Chief Cashier, her signature will start appearing on every new bank note from next Spring - a flourish that won't be required if we all switch to digital.

But I wonder if the Bank is still not taking bitcoin seriously enough.
Rapid growth

It's keen to emphasise just how small demand for the currency is right now. It calculates there are perhaps just 300 bitcoin transactions in the UK every day and only 20,000 people who have a digital wallet.

Victoria Cleland told me: "At the moment, there isn't much evidence of the general person in the street really wanting to move to bitcoin".

Then again, things on the internet have a habit of starting small and getting very big very fast.

Nicolas Cary of the BlockChain website points to the experience of PayPal, saying they "went from doing zero ... transactions to doing a couple of million to doing 10 million to doing 100 million. Bitcoin now does 200-300 million dollars-worth of transactions a day, and the speed at which it got to that point is an order of magnitude faster than PayPal."

He believes bitcoin could match VISA and Mastercard in size - possibly within just a few years.

But even if the Bank is right about bitcoin’s limited appeal in the UK, I suspect there are two other groups that might drive its usage - two groups at the opposite ends of the economic spectrum.
Billionaire banking

One is the super-rich. Many of them are exactly the sort of techie geeks who love the idea of bitcoin - including some who have made millions through investing in bitcoin itself. One such billionaire told me he'd consider holding 10 per cent of his wealth in bitcoin in future.

If that commitment gets repeated by other wealthy entrepreneurs, then bitcoin will become an important part of the financial infrastructure, and fast. It's not the volume of bitcoin transactions that will matter but their total worth.

Alongside the super-rich will be the super poor.
Financially excluded

Billions of people on the planet have no access to bank accounts and, frankly, the banking system has shown no interest in them.

Already, mobile phone technology has moved in to fill the gap – by creating a whole new payment system that allows people to move money by text. The M-Pesa system in Kenya is the most developed example. In that country, 12 million people use a text message system developed by Vodafone to make transfers - that's more than a quarter of the population.

Here in the UK, bitcoin allows anyone with a smartphone to effectively operate their own bank account, moving money for almost nothing.

You might not have a bank branch in a hundred miles, you might not trust the banks anyway, and you might not trust your nation's currency either. Bitcoin will allow you to circumvent them.

As the Bank says, one of the main attractions of the currency is that it "minimises the degree of trust participants need to place in any third party". It also, cuts down on commission fees charged to people trying to send money home.

So is bitcoin the future?

The internet is littered with next big things that disappeared back into the ether. Think MySpace or Friends Reunited. But the idea doesn't tend to die, it evolves. With even the Bank calling bitcoin "the internet of finance", it seems this idea may be here to stay.

http://www.channel4.com/news/bitcoin-ba ... t-currency

Paypal to accept Bitcoin

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2 ... ock-reddit

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Re: Moore's Law on Steroids: Bitcoin Mining

Postby MGV12 » Wed Aug 19, 2015 8:02 pm

K.I.S.S.

Bitcoin could split in debate over currency's future

"If you look at the guys working on the Bitcoin core, they talk about consensus all the time - but if you ask them what they really mean, they can't tell you," he said.
"There is no consensus about what consensus means."

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-33974826

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