Rules and Regulations

Any expat related issue or comment.

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Re: Rules and Regulations

Postby Roger Ramjet » Fri Feb 08, 2013 6:48 am

BKKBILL,
BKKBILL wrote:Google had 2,080,000 results in .41 seconds for "Australian children are to be banned from blowing out candles

You're totally correct, Richard Shears just presents the "news". It was the words banned and rules, and to instead of too that peeved me. NHMRC are just that, a body that can recommend guidelines only during an outbreak of bird flue (H5N1), but that would ruin the story.
What's a pansy? :D
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Re: Rules and Regulations

Postby Mike Judd » Fri Feb 08, 2013 9:33 am

A "Pansy" as I understand it is one of those unfortunate men ? who through no fault of their own (As they are born like it) who every year prance down Oxford st Sydney in the Mardi- Gras. They come from all walks of life not just Oz, but before you make any comment R. R. I am not one, and definitely don't help them out when they are busy. Even if I am an ex Pom.
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Re: Rules and Regulations

Postby Roger Ramjet » Fri Feb 08, 2013 10:01 am

A pansy is a mostly "British" flower or so Google says. :D I wonder if they have them in Canada? My argument is that sissy is English, so pansies must come from England......or Canada! :D
Queers come from Australia, but as some of my army mates were as queer two bob watches, I'll have to call them poofters.
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Re: Rules and Regulations

Postby MGV12 » Fri Feb 08, 2013 11:21 am

An 'alternative' view ... amusing if nothing else ... didn't find anyone else in a quick search on Google who supports this opinion:

"Have you ever wondered where the term "panzie" came from? Yeah, me neither, or at least until the other day when I was watching the Hitler Channel, I mean the History Channel. They had a show about German tank divisions in the Second World War that got me thinking. That's when I decided to research this piece!

The term "panzie" is a slang term used to denote someone is who is weak, perhaps even afraid. Panzies are often afraid of public humiliation, and cower in fear.

Many people think that this name is derived from the name of the flower "pansy." This assumption, while not totally ridiculous since the words "pansy" and "panzie" are homonyms, is incorrect.

The term "panzie" is actually derived from the World War II term "panzer."

Panzers, being the tanks used by the Germans in WWII, were the ones who dished out the punishment and inspired fear in the hearts of the allied troops. Those allied units who, especially at the beginning of the war, were the ones that took a beating and fled from the German tanks. Thus you had the "panz-ers" and the "panz-ees."

The spelling and pronunciation of "panzee" changed over time and eventually became "panzie." And you can quote me on that!"


http://www.thehatchreport.com/commentar ... pansy.html

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Re: Rules and Regulations

Postby Roger Ramjet » Fri Feb 08, 2013 12:46 pm

MGV12,
So would that make a "male" poofter a panzer and the "female" poofter a panzee?
All the jokes aside, for anyone who is interested, you can call them sissy, weak, perhaps even afraid, but when the chips are down there's a brave man in everyone.....Zulu Rorke's Drift! 7 VC's! The film Zulu is an Australian Army training film......I sat through it 12 times.
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Re: Rules and Regulations

Postby Ians » Fri Feb 08, 2013 9:04 pm

Roger Ramjet wrote:MGV12,
So would that make a "male" poofter a panzer and the "female" poofter a panzee?
All the jokes aside, for anyone who is interested, you can call them sissy, weak, perhaps even afraid, but when the chips are down there's a brave man in everyone.....Zulu Rorke's Drift! 7 VC's! The film Zulu is an Australian Army training film......I sat through it 12 times.


According to Wikipedia:

"Eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded to the defenders of Rorke's Drift, seven of them to soldiers of the 2nd/24th Foot – the most ever received in a single action by one regiment (although not, as commonly thought, the most won in a single action or the most won in a day: 16 were won at the Battle of Inkerman, on 5 November 1854; 28 were won during the Second Relief of Lucknow, 14–22 November 1857).[45]

Four Distinguished Conduct Medals were also awarded. This high number of awards for bravery has been interpreted as a reaction to the earlier defeat at the Battle of Isandlwana - the extolling of the victory at Rorke's Drift drawing the public's attention away from the great defeat at Isandlwana and the fact that Lord Chelmsford and Bartle Frere had instigated the war without the approval of Her Majesty's Government.[46]"
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Re: Rules and Regulations

Postby Roger Ramjet » Fri Feb 08, 2013 10:08 pm

Ians,
The eleven is totally correct as far I remember. Seven to an infantry unit and the other four were awarded to those "sissy, weak, afraid" noncombatants that became combatants. The other training film was The Krait or Operation Jaywick or Z Force, I forget what it was called.
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Re: Rules and Regulations

Postby Ians » Sat Feb 09, 2013 1:18 pm

Roger Ramjet wrote:Ians,
The eleven is totally correct as far I remember. Seven to an infantry unit and the other four were awarded to those "sissy, weak, afraid" noncombatants that became combatants. The other training film was The Krait or Operation Jaywick or Z Force, I forget what it was called.



Just researching and came across the following which might be of interest.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/ ... Drift.html
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Re: Rules and Regulations

Postby Roger Ramjet » Sat Feb 09, 2013 3:09 pm

Ians,
Ah academics and politicians, they always come along years later and try and rewrite battles, rewrite citations and rearrange "truths" at the time.
The real hero of Zulu or Rorke's Drift was the Martini-Henry rifle, without it there would have been another massacre. The one thing I could never understand was why in the movie the British didn't use their most feared tactic right till the end; Three ranks, front rank lying, middle rank kneeling, rear rank standing and taking alternative shots. No wonder most of the British infantry soldiers were deaf as posts. The Martini-Henry was good for 1,000 yards and was very accurate. Having sandbags was absolutely useless unless the piled them so high the Zulus couldn't get over them, in which case they would have needed a platform to stand on. The Zulus spears were not throwing spears they were stabbing spears so it was "wait until you see the whites of their eyes".
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Re: Rules and Regulations

Postby Ians » Sat Feb 09, 2013 5:13 pm

Ah, the Martini-Henry rifle, I once owned one in my younger days, from memory 0.3 calibre, my friend was a gunsmith and we were going to re-chamber it etc. to a more readily available and cost efficient calibre . Never got round to it, bought a .243 with a Mauser action instead, reworked the trigger mechanism to a single action - excellent and very accurate rifle. Sold my collection of 4 rifles at the time of the government re-call :( - really had no need for then other than keep-sakes. Today I have an electric BB for chasing pigeons - bit of a come-down.
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Re: Rules and Regulations

Postby Mike Judd » Sun Feb 10, 2013 6:02 am

In my short Army career doing the compulsory national Service (Something that the youth of today could do with) I never fired a gun in anger and apart from a bit of target practice with the old Lee Enfield 303 and carrying it around when ever we embarked and disembarked from various camps in Africa, that was it. Until one day on one of my trips back from Oz I bought 2 antique pistols in London, a real old English Horse pistol. a flint lock and the other one converted from a Flint lock into a Cap. Both hundreds of years old, of course when I declared them at Customs in Sydney they immediately lost any interest in all the other duty free goods of the time that I was bringing in. End result was they kept them for 3 months when I was told to collect them from Customs with each stamped with a long number on the brass butt. I was also told to keep a book that had to be taken into my local Police station every year with the pistols and get it signed off by the Gun Sergeant .This went on for a couple of years, then I was informed that there was going to be a charge of $50 per year, "hang on" I thought ? this is the start of a ever increasing fee that has no end, so I promptly informed them that they had been stolen, which they must have accepted as I heard no more. All this for something that needed Black powder/Balls and flints etc; just to start with, even then I always thought that you would have more success using them as clubs if attacked. Talk about "Keep your powder dry".
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Re: Rules and Regulations

Postby MGV12 » Tue Jun 11, 2013 5:16 pm

Not quite in the Apple league but a tad ungrateful:

Millionaire Iranian businessman who was granted asylum in UK at age of 12 WON'T have to pay £850,000 tax bill, High Court rules

He came to Britain as a 12-year-old Iranian refugee and claimed he would get ‘a bullet in the head’ if he was forced to return to his homeland.

But Hossein Mehjoo has triggered fury after winning a High Court battle allowing him not to pay a penny in tax from selling the business that he subsequently set up.

The 53-year-old made an eye-watering £8.5million from the sale of his successful clothing business, Bank Fashion Limited, in 2005.

On the proceeds, he should have paid capital gains tax, then charged at 10 per cent, equal to a bill of around £850,000.

To many people, this is the least he should have done after a campaign in the early 1980s battled to keep Mr Mehjoo, who was facing deportation back to Iran, in this country.

At the time, he insisted: ‘If they send me back, I can only expect a bullet in the head. I am terrified of going back. I will fight this all the way. If necessary, they will have to handcuff me and drag me to the aircraft.’

But, despite being rescued by Britain after being granted the right to stay by the Home Office in 1982, he went onto to do everything possible to avoid paying his fair share of tax.

When Mr Mehjoo sold his business, he used a tax-avoidance scheme to try to avoid paying capital gains tax. When this scheme failed, he sued his accountants, Harben Barker, for failing to put him into a different tax-avoidance scheme which would have worked.

Following his extraordinary High Court victory last week, Mr Mehjoo, is set to scoop more than £1.2million.

This includes around £764,000 for some of the capital gains tax that he was forced to pay when the first tax-dodging scheme failed, £180,000 for the cost of setting up the first tax-dodging scheme which failed and around £230,000 for the interest paid to HM Revenue and Customs for late payment of the capital gains tax bill.

Mr Mehjoo, who was a professional squash player before setting up his clothing empire, already enjoys a gold-plated lifestyle, including an exclusive yacht.

In September 2005, just a few months after selling his business, he bought a £1.33million house – with two tennis courts - in the exclusive village of Barnt Green in Worcestershire.

It has been extensively renovated from the black-enamelled Aga cooker in the kitchen to chandeliers in the hallway, described by one visitor last year as having ‘a wow factor’ in every room.

Nicola Smith, head of economics at the Trades Union Congress, said: ‘This case illustrates how out of control Britain’s tax dodging industry has become.

‘Our tax laws are simply not fit for purpose as they are too easily avoided by those who can afford to dodge them.

‘The Government needs to wrestle back control of our tax system from accountants, big companies and super-rich individuals so that everyone starts paying their fair share.’

'Our tax laws are simply not fit for purpose as they are too easily avoided by those who can afford to dodge them'

Overall, Britain is being robbed of around £32billion a year by cheats who refuse to pay their taxes and others who find ways of avoiding them, according to HMRC.

Meanwhile, cash-strapped families and young workers saddled with other debts from mortgages to overdrafts are managing to pay their taxes despite struggling to make ends meet.

Last Wednesday, Judge Silber said Mr Mehjoo’s accountants should have referred him to a non-domicile specialist as they did not have the relevant expertise.

Mr Mehjoo, who was born in Tehran and came to boarding school in West Yorkshire at the age of 12, is a non-domicile, which brings with it significant tax advantages.
Returns: Overall, Britain is being robbed of around £32billion a year by cheats who refuse to pay their taxes and others who find ways of avoiding them, according to HMRC

Returns: Overall, Britain is being robbed of around £32billion a year by cheats who refuse to pay their taxes and others who find ways of avoiding them, according to HMRC

If he had been advised to go into a ‘Bearer Warrant Planning’ scheme – a tax-saving scheme only available to non-domiciles – Mr Mehjoo would not have paid any capital gains tax.

Unlike the tax-dodging scheme which he was put into, a ‘Capital Redemption Plan’, which failed, forcing him to pay the tax bill that he had tried to avoid, BWPs were successful at the time. The loophole has subsequently been closed down.

'If a case goes to the courts, it must follow the law, even if everybody thinks the law comes out with an immoral answer'

Tina Riches, Chartered Institute of Taxation

Tina Riches, a director of the Chartered Institute of Taxation, said: ‘If a case goes to the courts, it must follow the law, even if everybody thinks the law comes out with an immoral answer.’

An HMRC spokesman said: ‘It would be very dangerous to draw any general conclusions about the use of avoidance schemes from a specific case.

‘Most schemes simply don't work and HMRC effectively challenges avoidance across the board. You can be left with considerable costs including tax penalties on top of the tax and interest that should have been paid in the first place.’

Mr Mehjoo’s accountants, Harben Barker, plan to appeal.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z2Vtvig4T3

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Re: Rules and Regulations

Postby Ians » Tue Jun 11, 2013 6:37 pm

" Millionaire Iranian businessman who was granted asylum in UK at age of 12 WON'T have to pay £850,000 tax bill, High Court rules"
......
Sounds like a good candidate to take up residence in Thailand, can join the rest of the Hi-So's for the free ride.
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Re: Rules and Regulations

Postby BKKBILL » Tue Jun 18, 2013 12:26 pm

When did the insanity start????

Residents transform dingy back alley into a glorious garden only to be told it's a health and safety risk - by the SAME council that gave them an award for it
The Whitley Bay Bloom award-winning flower pots now considered a hazard
Organiser Michael Kelley says he is 'absolutely livid' after all residents' work
They are now encouraged to get a grant for safety-compliant flower pots

article-2343340-1A5E435B000005DC-273_964x577.jpg

The rest is at

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... -work.html
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Re: Rules and Regulations

Postby MGV12 » Tue Jun 18, 2013 12:55 pm

Thai monks under fire for allegedly living in fast lane

2013-Lamborghini-Veneno-on-the-road-480.jpg


Read more: http://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2013/06/17/ ... z2WXoBZXc7
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