petrol in Thailand

Any expat related issue or comment.

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Re: petrol in Thailand

Postby geordie » Sat Aug 11, 2012 4:31 pm

fredlk wrote:They are thinner and fitter than his lot and they don't have to have sex all the time like his do :roll: but when I say stunted I say it from a Labrador's or Great Dane's point of view.

Ok my lot are jailed all the time but beleive me they exersise about 50 times a day sprinting for the front gate to attack anyone having the audacity to pass the house then there is the fighting 3-4 times a day when the two boys try to kill each other the sex is incidental but good exercise anyway :mrgreen:
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Re: petrol in Thailand

Postby fredlk » Sat Aug 11, 2012 4:41 pm

geordie wrote: the sex is incidental

Sounds like my life .... :lol: Back to Petrol in Thailand ....
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Re: petrol in Thailand

Postby fredlk » Sat Aug 11, 2012 4:45 pm

geordie wrote:i managed 240 miles on 40 litres

That is 9.654 kilometres per litre which is better than I ever got in the Audi, but it was (quite) a bit faster and the suspension was a little more conducive to high speeds.
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Re: petrol in Thailand

Postby geordie » Sat Aug 11, 2012 5:01 pm

fredlk wrote:That is 9.654 kilometres per litre which is better than I ever got in the Audi, but it was (quite) a bit faster and the suspension was a little more conducive to high speeds.


I thimk this one has been beefed up to carry a load""" it has no suspension :( """" got it over 90 a couple of times
but dificult trafic on that road may b e forced to buy somthing comfortable soon i find myself reluctant to drive short journeys in it because never any parking and long journeys are not comfortable ?

BTW any allowance being made for the fact that in our native country we would likely use aircon a lot less
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Re: petrol in Thailand

Postby fredlk » Fri Aug 24, 2012 11:00 am

fredlk wrote:I put in 30 litres - a three quarter tank - of the new Nitro V-Power 95 (Gasohol) at Shell today at 41.38 per litre.

I got an average of 17 kilometres per litre on that tank of fuel so there is no visible saving - although some may point out that this is not scientific. :roll: I don't give a hoot.

Now I've filled up with Shell FuelSave Gasohol 95 at 38.10 Baht per litre. I meant to get the 91 but I didn't have my glasses on and stopped at the wrong pump. :lol:
After 40 Kilometres I'm averaging 17.5 kilometres per litre.
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Re: petrol in Thailand

Postby fredlk » Tue Aug 28, 2012 6:46 am

fredlk wrote: Shell FuelSave Gasohol 95

My driving is the same, maybe at times even slower, but with this new tank of fuel the average has dropped to 16.1 kilometres per litre.
Yes, it's not scientific, but as far as I am concerned Shell FuelSave hasn't saved fuel in my 1.2 cc Suzuki Swift as yet.
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Re: petrol in Thailand

Postby geordie » Tue Aug 28, 2012 10:25 am

fredlk wrote:
fredlk wrote: Shell FuelSave Gasohol 95

My driving is the same, maybe at times even slower, but with this new tank of fuel the average has dropped to 16.1 kilometres per litre.
Yes, it's not scientific, but as far as I am concerned Shell FuelSave hasn't saved fuel in my 1.2 cc Suzuki Swift as yet.


scientific enough for me i am disapointed i don,t have the fuel meter on it the last civic i had did have a light green was good no green no economy ? it tempted you to try and get the light on ?? maybe thats the eco tag :lol: thousands of people driving it around looking at the lttle meter trying to get the figures up
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Re: petrol in Thailand

Postby fredlk » Fri Aug 31, 2012 12:17 pm

fredlk wrote: Shell FuelSave Gasohol 95

A quarter tank later and a couple of longer drives and the average is 17.3 kilometres even with some fast driving. Maybe this stuff does work.
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Re: petrol in Thailand

Postby wwwbkkaptcom » Sat Jun 17, 2017 11:45 am

Hello,

I still don't understand the difference between E10 and 91 or 95 ? Ok I understand that 91 and 95 are octane numbers, but nobody explains what is the octane number or E20 !

As E10, 91 and 95 all have 10% ethanol, why some older cars cannot use E10 ?

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Re: petrol in Thailand

Postby Roger Ramjet » Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:07 pm

wwwbkkaptcom wrote:As E10, 91 and 95 all have 10% ethanol, why some older cars cannot use E10 ?

Most of the newer cars (10 years old) will take E20. My two old Honda Jazz both took E20. My Suzuki Swift 3 years old takes E20. My 10 year old BMW 525i takes E95.
The octane rating is based on the antiknock rating for a car indicating the antiknock properties of a fuel, based on a comparison with a mixture of isooctane and heptane. The higher the octane the less lightly that your engine will knock.
It also involves heat and compression. There are numerous websites that explain it a lot better than I can.
I've actually found that I get better fuel mileage in my BMW than the 1.3 litre Jazz, the 1.5 litre Jazz and the 1.3 litre Suzuki Swift, but that is due to Honda and Suzuki have not changed their engine configuration for the last 15 years. The Civic still uses the same engine it did (both 1.7 litre and 2 litre) nearly 20 years ago.
It will also depend on the number of gears in the car and of course the speed you drive at. The best I could ever get out of the 1.5 Honda Jazz was about 13 kpl, whereas the BMW gives me a constant 16 KPL and the engine is twice the size and three times the power.
It all comes down to getting more bang for your buck at the pump. I filled the BMW today and it's good for 638 kilometres at the cost of 1,200 baht, but is far more sophisticated than the Suzuki Swift that will go just 470 kilometres for 900 baht with a tiny 1.3 litre engine. And load matters as well.
Most new cars in Thailand use E20 because it is claimed they are saving o fossil fuels and the tax is therefore lower.
Basically the higher the octane the more compression in the cylinders and therefore the more sophisticated the head because of the heat generated in the cylinder.
I'm sure MGV12 can explain it a lot better than i can.
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Re: petrol in Thailand

Postby Andyfteeze » Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:50 pm

if your car is designed to run on 91 octane, you can run 95/98 but you wont get any benefit. If the car is designed to run on 98 octane, you can run on 91 but you will lose performance and economy. If your car can run on E10, the petrol will be cheaper but will run less kilometers. If you have an older car, say more than ten years old, dont run E10, it will eat through the fuel lines, unless of coarse if its allowed on the car compliance plate. Went through all this in australia a few years back. The car I have back home is a V6 3ltr. It will happily run on E10 but i dont go as far. I used to buy E10 due to empty pockets, lol.
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