wood glue

Anything to do with wood or woodworking for example, DIY woodworking, Construction techniques using wood, etc.

Moderators: Sometimewoodworker, MGV12, BKKBILL, pattayapope, Attila

Re: wood glue

Postby canopy » Mon Nov 06, 2017 8:40 pm

I am a little skeptical about this assertion. It seems unwise to use a non-waterproof glue to make a wooden bowl. Otherwise the glue would soften when used, destroy the joint, and ooze into the food. And you do know titebond I and II are not food safe. Nor are they waterproof. It's not a cost of certification thing.
canopy
 
Posts: 299
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 1:15 pm

Re: wood glue

Postby Klondyke » Mon Nov 06, 2017 11:02 pm

canopy wrote:I am a little skeptical about this assertion. It seems unwise to use a non-waterproof glue to make a wooden bowl.

Not sure what are you refering to. Our 2-component glue is waterproof and food-safe as all varnishing material we use - as most of our products are for food stuff.

Attached picture shows a bowl I made for IKEA few years ago (plus few more items) in 2 years contract where the bowl easily withstands a number of hours filled in with water.
And all the products can be maintained by water as any other dishes in a swashing sink (despite a caution label the retailer attaches to be covered against any claim) without any visible deterioration over number of years. Unlike other products where the seller specifies a regular applying a special oil every few months once the surface is suitably repolished.

Image

Image
Klondyke
 
Posts: 330
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2014 10:40 pm

Re: wood glue

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Tue Nov 07, 2017 4:46 am

canopy wrote:I am a little skeptical about this assertion. It seems unwise to use a non-waterproof glue to make a wooden bowl. Otherwise the glue would soften when used, destroy the joint, and ooze into the food. And you do know titebond I and II are not food safe. Nor are they waterproof. It's not a cost of certification thing.

I did not suggest using a non water proof glue for an outdoor or water contract use, nor wood I use shellac for that use. FWIW
Titebond III Ultimate Wood Glue and Titebond II Premium Wood Glue have both been approved for indirect food contact.


My comments are related to the general idea that "you must use a certified food safe finish" for anything that comes into contact with food, when the fact is that all finishes that fully cure are food safe when they are fully cured. That doesn't mean that they are good for the job just that they are all "food safe" with or without a certificate.

On a different note I would be interested to know the type of glue and finish used in the really nice wood products you are making Klondike.
Sometimewoodworker
 
Posts: 1835
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 1:22 pm
Location: Non Sa-At / Tokyo

Re: wood glue

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Tue Nov 07, 2017 5:08 am

canopy wrote:
schuimpge wrote:Can only find Titebond on ThaiCarpenter, and they price it at 1800 Baht p/gallon


Everything I have learned about Titebond iii is fantastic

1. certified waterproof suitable for indoor or outdoor use
2. certified food safe; can use it for making cutting boards and things
3. longer working time than most glues
4. single part, cleans up with water
5. the choice of experts
6. great technical support that understands tropical hardwoods and how to make effective glue jobs

If you go to the franklinadhesivesandpolymers.com and look at distributors you will find one for Thailand and price is 1700 baht/gallon which is the smallest quantity they sell. Needless to say, I am now a happy customer.


Except
Titebond wrote:The key to the disassembly of glue joints is weakening the bond. For Titebond Original, Titebond II and Titebond III, raising the glue joint temperature with a heat gun or a blow dryer will reduce the glue's strength. Steam from an iron may also work.

Probably also my guess is long term direct exposure to tropical sun will do the same job.

So the two part glue Klondike is using as it is most likely to be a polymerisation reaction glue or a urea based glue like cascamite would be my choices.
Sometimewoodworker
 
Posts: 1835
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 1:22 pm
Location: Non Sa-At / Tokyo

Re: wood glue

Postby Klondyke » Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:33 am

The glue is really perfect once applied on properly prepared surfaces, i.e. dry and free of oil. Then, when a breakage of the product happen - by an extensive impact - the crack occurs in the wood, not in the glued joint.

Image

Joints of teak surfaces might experience certain problems - because of its high content of lignin oil. Therefore it is recommended to apply the glue immediately without much delay after the two surfaces machining before the oil starts to seep out .
Klondyke
 
Posts: 330
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2014 10:40 pm

Re: wood glue

Postby canopy » Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:56 am

Klondyke wrote:Not sure what are you refering to. Our 2-component glue is waterproof and food-safe as all varnishing material we use


My criticism was not directed at you, but rather someone who said "virtually all glue...are food safe once they are fully cured". It is refreshing to see you select only certified food safe glue when appropriate. Also kudos for taking the time to understand teak's unique properties to assure gluing is sound. This is good quality and a rarity in Thailand to care this much about your products.

Say, do the teak cutting boards hold up after use? Teak is a bit soft so I always wondered if using knives on it would cause too much surface damage.
canopy
 
Posts: 299
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 1:15 pm

Re: wood glue

Postby schuimpge » Tue Nov 07, 2017 9:34 am

Very interesting stuff Klondyke...as Canopy said, thanks for sharing...
I'm only a hobby wood-worker, but absolutely enjoy working with wood and sure also seeing other's craftsmanship.
If ever I get up North, I sure pm you to have a look at your factory.

Cheers,
Luc
User avatar
schuimpge
 
Posts: 1314
Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2012 11:01 am
Location: Pathumthani, Thailand

Re: wood glue

Postby Klondyke » Tue Nov 07, 2017 10:19 am

canopy wrote:Say, do the teak cutting boards hold up after use? Teak is a bit soft so I always wondered if using knives on it would cause too much surface damage.


Actually, the things what I show are all of local acacia (Mai chamchaa). We rarely work with teak, not only because of the price (if cannot using acacia or rubberwood I am importing ash and oak wood from USA, getting it cheaper than the local teak) and the hassle with paperwork with Forestry. Mainly, that after all, the unique acacia texture is much more attractive than rather dull teak. In fact, "discovered" in Thailand for kitchenware after strong teak restriction some 30 years ago. And later appreciated as more aesthetic than rubberwood, a usual wood for kitchenware from Asia.

Anyway, for the common use the surface of any wood does not show much damages after years. But surely, it is not eternal.
Klondyke
 
Posts: 330
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2014 10:40 pm

Re: wood glue

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Tue Nov 07, 2017 10:19 am

canopy wrote: Teak is a bit soft so I always wondered if using knives on it would cause too much surface damage.


For end grain cutting boards Teak at about 1,155 lbf (JANKA Hardness scale) is about in the middle of the range of wood commonly used which includes hard maple, ash, and pine (1,320~870). Some people will use walnut, which can be problematic. Also if you use oak you can get some really impressive blue tanic stains.

With an end grain cutting board made with softer wood the cuts will often close up.

If you want to use one for food preparation (cutting) then a non hardening oil is recommended, usually mineral oil as it doesn't go rancid, or a very thinned varnish that is completely absorbed into the wood and does not form a film.
Sometimewoodworker
 
Posts: 1835
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 1:22 pm
Location: Non Sa-At / Tokyo

Previous

Return to wood and woodworking

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest