wood panels

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wood panels

Postby canopy » Mon Jun 15, 2015 8:51 am

For a wainscot I was wanting to use teak boards for stiles and rails. Has anyone found any sort of wood panels they like for something like this or other wood working projects? Something that lasts in this climate and not a bug magnet.
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Re: wood panels

Postby pipoz » Mon Jun 15, 2015 2:09 pm

canopy wrote:For a wainscot I was wanting to use teak boards for stiles and rails. Has anyone found any sort of wood panels they like for something like this or other wood working projects? Something that lasts in this climate and not a bug magnet.


You can get good quality old teak from Chiang Mai (from old Thai houses, so it is well seasoned and stable) but it is not cheap. It's also quite hard and when treated with Chandrite, before being finished sealed, should resist the termites.

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Re: wood panels

Postby canopy » Mon Jun 15, 2015 5:50 pm

Understood. But I am looking for advice on the panels, not the boards. You know, big panels usually sold in 4x8' sheets. I've heard plywood and MDF are not good here. The only other wood type paneling I have seen so far is finger jointed rubber wood. I don't know how stable it is in regards to humidity and bugs, but even then I am not sure it could look very good with those jagged joints.
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Re: wood panels

Postby Klondyke » Mon Jun 15, 2015 7:10 pm

Hi Canopy,
perhaps I could help you. Sending you a PM.
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Re: wood panels

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Mon Jun 15, 2015 9:18 pm

canopy wrote:Understood. But I am looking for advice on the panels, not the boards. You know, big panels usually sold in 4x8' sheets. I've heard plywood and MDF are not good here. The only other wood type paneling I have seen so far is finger jointed rubber wood. I don't know how stable it is in regards to humidity and bugs, but even then I am not sure it could look very good with those jagged joints.

The termites love rubber wood DAMHIKT but with chanderite its OK
As to looks here are examples, the A grade has no knots.


image.jpg
Light coloured shellac then WBP


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Different Light coloured shellac then WBP


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Water based poly
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Re: wood panels

Postby canopy » Tue Jun 16, 2015 12:50 pm

Wow, those surfaces turned out real well. Thanks for the look at what can be achieved and the tip about grades & bugs.

One other thing. Why treat using a harmful poison like chaindrite? Where I come from borate is a safe, harmless, cheap, easy, and long lasting wood treatment used for countless past generations. Just curious.
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Re: wood panels

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Tue Jun 16, 2015 5:34 pm

canopy wrote:Wow, those surfaces turned out real well. Thanks for the look at what can be achieved and the tip about grades & bugs.

One other thing. Why treat using a harmful poison like chaindrite? Where I come from borate is a safe, harmless, cheap, easy, and long lasting wood treatment used for countless past generations. Just curious.

I have no experience using borate products or ability to find them in the Thai shops. I have been using Cuprinol for many years it has been very effective and chanderite is similar to it. They can both be covered with almost any finish you like after they have dried for a week or two.
As to rubber wood you probably won't have choices of grade unless you take a trip to wood street.
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Re: wood panels

Postby Klondyke » Tue Jun 16, 2015 8:08 pm

Rubberwood, immediately after saw milling, is treated by borate wood preservatives under pressure in autoclaves. Afterwards it is dried up under 10% wood moisture. Without this imminent procedure the insect would be very happy to enjoy the rubber residua.

Image


Since the rubber trees are not so huge and not always straight the milling is made manually (and quite dangerously) with resulted length max. 120 cm and width 4".

Image
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Re: wood panels

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Tue Jun 16, 2015 9:44 pm

Klondyke wrote:Rubberwood, immediately after saw milling, is treated by borate wood preservatives under pressure in autoclaves. Afterwards it is dried up under 10% wood moisture. Without this imminent procedure the insect would be very happy to enjoy the rubber residua.

If that is the case for all rubber wood panels then it is a good reason to use chanderite. As my experience of wood eating insects has been on a rubber wood panel. I now treat all my wood with chanderite and have had no problems that I have noticed.
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Re: wood panels

Postby canopy » Thu May 25, 2017 7:06 am

Does anyone know what is used for making wood cabinets here?
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Re: wood panels

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Thu May 25, 2017 8:04 am

canopy wrote:Does anyone know what is used for making wood cabinets here?

Er wood. :shock:

You need to be a bit more specific in your question.

Many "wood" cabinets will use veneered chipboard or MDF, this is independent of price. If they use wood then at the bottom end it will be whatever species is cheap, as you get into higher prices you may get named species and they may even use that one in constructing the pieces.
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Re: wood panels

Postby canopy » Mon May 29, 2017 11:37 am

MDF shrinks and expands greatly between the wet and dry seasons of Thailand. And MDF molds quickly even if kept in a dry area. I can't think of how it would be useful for anything yet there it is in the stores.
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Re: wood panels

Postby Andyfteeze » Mon May 29, 2017 1:33 pm

Mdf here cannot be taken seriuosly as a building material. Cheap ply is also in this category. They need to be treated in manufacture to be water resistant. In australia , kitchen bench tops are made of water resistant MDF cores. It has a green tinge. You can buy marine grade ply too.
As someone else mentioned, teak is the best here for a reason, it lasts. Seasoned teak is expensive though. However, i did buy some knarly looking teak planks cheaply. Old looking and weathered somewhat but a good 35mm thick. I used my electric plane on them and wow, what beautiful timber.
I went to a few secondhand shops, but you wouldnt think so after getting prices. And i dont get why. Thais dont use secondhand materials in building yet are happy to play dumb with no business sense. :lol: Would you keep stock for 10yrs in the rain hoping some dumb arse will pick it in 10yrs time? Business sense would dictate cycling the goods through asap. Cashflow and all. :lol:
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Re: wood panels

Postby Klondyke » Mon May 29, 2017 8:17 pm

Of course teak is the most expensive wood in Land Of Teak. Almost - there are few other more expensive species, but they are out of question for commercial use of normal people. Beside, teak is restricted, any transport can bring you in big troubles with police. Unless you have a trustful paper confirmed by Forestry Office. Also secondhand teak obtained from demolished village houses is quite expensive (and full of nails too).

Of course, there are companies authorized by Forestry licence (I have got it), however, never any easy handling case by case. And of course, there are always some who know how to handle it without a licence, we are in Thailand.

Hence, there is practically no other wood available in Thailand for a commercial use, that's why we never see a roof construction by a wood. Unlike in US where we (almost) never see any other roof construction than by a wood. Here in larger cities are few shops with construction timber originating mostly from Indonesia, Malaysia, however, not quite cheap.

The only local wood for a commercial use in a larger quantity is rubberwood (hevea) used by many Thai factories, mostly for kitchenware, tableware, also for smaller furniture, mostly for export. Besides, in smaller volume there is an increased use of local acacia, (monkeypod, mai chamchaa, jamchuree), also for kitchenware and also for small furniture. Acacia has been "discovered" some 30 years ago for a successful substitution of teak, sometimes much more attractive that teak and much cheaper. However, these two local species (rubberwood and acacia) are obtained only in shorter lengths, mainly just 1 m, so not quite suitable for construction of building nor cabinets.

Because of these unavailability problems, Thai woodworking factories import wood mostly from US, with hardly believable huge volume, one of the highest in Asia (behind China). And this wood, (mostly hardwood) is preferably used for furniture making.

MDF, chipboards, etc boards are successfully used for cabinet making, also in Thailand in large modern factories with a good technology. There is hardly other material found even in expensive furniture stores where a kitchen price is around 1M. Of course the counter is not the same material as the cabinet.

If ordered a cabinet at smaller local shops they do either by a solid wood or by frame with plywood (or MDF) cladding. Both techniques can be good if well crafted. And it does not need to be a teak. But there are also places in the North where they offer solid teak furniture with various quality and prices, mostly made by a planted teak, hence, supported (and controlled - somehow :? ) by local administrative.
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Re: wood panels

Postby Klondyke » Mon May 29, 2017 8:51 pm

Time by time I too import oak and ash wood from US:
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Then, although not really specializing on furniture, doing sometimes built-in cabinets, combination of solid wood and plywood:
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And it does not need to be necessarily teak, acacia is sometimes much more attractive:
Image
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