People/companies that the world might be better off without

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People/companies that the world might be better off without

Postby MGV12 » Sun Oct 26, 2014 11:34 am

Before any word is 'set in stone' I would suggest anyone who wishes to contribute to this thread thinks about who other than CTH members might be looking on.

Some that I personally have little time for are mentioned herewith:

No Angel: The Secret Life of Bernie Ecclestone by Tom Bower – review

Men who bluff and bully their way to enormous fortunes are Tom Bower's special subject. His targets have included Robert Maxwell, Tiny Rowland, Mohammed al Fayed, Conrad Black and Richard Branson, so it was probably inevitable that Bernie Ecclestone, the billionaire ringmaster of Formula One, would one day wander into his authorial cross-hairs.

The son of a Suffolk trawlerman, Ecclestone was already sharpening his legendary commercial acumen in the school playground. Bower is not the first to tell the story of how he would complete two paper rounds before setting off for school; the money he earned would be spent on buns, sold on at a profit to his classmates. The deals are somewhat larger now. His most recent coup – executed last year, shortly before his 80th birthday – was to sign an agreement under which the Russian government will pay his organisation $280m over seven years for the privilege of holding an annual grand prix in Sochi, a Black Sea resort, while spending probably as much again on building a circuit for the purpose. The deal was concluded in a private 15-minute meeting between Ecclestone and Vladimir Putin, the latest world leader keen to do business with the beguilingly sinister 5ft 3in impresario.

Putin is probably one of the few people in the world who is not frightened of Ecclestone. Another would be Slavica Malic, a 6ft 2in Croatian model who, in Bower's gruesomely entertaining account, became the second Mrs Ecclestone in 1985 and secured a £750m divorce settlement – probably around a quarter of his total wealth – after leaving him 23 years later. Elsewhere, and particularly within the Formula One paddock, his power is absolute and questioned only by those with no regard for their future in the sport.

That power was accumulated over a period of more than 30 years, during which, as Bower accurately notes, Ecclestone "transformed Formula One from a mere enthusiasts' sport into one of the world's most watched entertainments". After buying the Brabham team in 1971, on terms typically favourable to himself, and reorganising it with characteristic rigour, Ecclestone recognised that here was a little world ripe for the taking. With the assistance of Max Mosley, a qualified barrister and former driver and team owner, he assumed leadership of the teams in a war for control waged against the governing body, the Federation Internationale de l'Automobile, an organisation of blazered blusterers unused to being challenged. Deploying skills developed as a successful dealer in the tough postwar second-hand car trade, he made offers that amateurs could not refuse.

Ecclestone's great vision – which would set an example for sport in general, notably the English Premier League – was to see that the future lay in television rights, which had previously been distributed piecemeal and for peanuts, and to move his sport into the emerging markets outside Europe. When he successfully renegotiated the broadcasting rights, having leased them from the FIA, assigned them to his own company, started to charge real money and distributed a proportion of the proceeds to the teams, nobody objected. Even a minor percentage of something was better than the practically nothing they had been getting, and eventually that minor percentage made all the sport's leading participants very rich men indeed. Ecclestone himself, of course, had been getting richer still.

The key to his ultimate triumph was the election of Mosley as the president of the FIA. Together they battled the EU over the ban on tobacco sponsorship, and fought off the European competitions commissioner's disapproval of Mosley's extraordinary decision to extend his friend's lease on the sport's commercial rights to 100 years. An accomplished double act, suave patrician and brusque street-fighter, they specialised in keeping their opponents on the wrong foot, often expressing divergent opinions on some contentious issue or other before effortlessly reuniting in victory.

About 10 years ago Ecclestone saw the chance to make a real killing from his unique domination of a sport into which sponsors, equipment suppliers, motor manufacturers, broadcasters and governments were pouring billions. In a series of complicated manoeuvres, through which he sold and took back the commercial rights three or four times and pocketed several billion pounds in the process, the ownership of Formula One's revenue streams ended up in the hands of a private equity firm which made the purchase with the aid of £2.9bn borrowed from RBS's Fred Goodwin. The new owners employ Ecclestone as chief executive at a salary of £2.5m, plus fuel for his £40m private jet, on the unarguably correct grounds that no one else can do the job nearly as well as a man now in his ninth decade.

Bower does his best here, but Formula One's business dealings have always been camouflaged by smokescreens of secrecy and evasion, and to understand fully the events described between pages 223-237 and 260-267, for example, you would probably need to be Ecclestone himself, sitting at the centre of a web of holding companies with tax-shelter addresses. Somewhat clearer, although not new, is the description of his success in making further fortunes by toying with the existence of the British Grand Prix, an event he treats with the refined cruelty of a particularly vicious cat holding a fieldmouse between its paws.

Ecclestone himself has not been left entirely unscathed by success. His nose was bitten off by a Las Vegas casino owner's Alsatian dog a few years ago, and he has been expensively mugged outside his London home on a couple of occasions. The most recent assault took place at the end of last year, when his £25,000 watch was among items snatched by thieves. Since no opportunity to make money can be neglected, a few days after the incident the watch's manufacturer took out a newspaper advertisement showing his badly bruised face next to the slogan: "See what some people will do for a Hublot".

Nothing, however, has damaged him as badly as his encounter with New Labour in 1997, when he was invited to make a £1m-donation to Tony Blair's election campaign and encouraged by Michael Levy to turn it into an annual unrepayable "loan", on the clear understanding that Downing Street would reciprocate by helping Formula One in its fight to maintain its income from tobacco companies. In exposing the squalid machinations and duplicities of Blair, Levy, Peter Mandelson, Derry Irvine, Gordon Brown and their functionaries, Bower allows Ecclestone to emerge as the victim, the great manipulator caught, helpless and humiliated, in a net of politicians' lies.

Bower is not at ease with the language or the history of motor racing. Teeth will be ground at the assertions that 96 spectators were killed in the appalling crash at Le Mans in 1955 (the correct number is 83), that the Renault team copied Ferrari in introducing turbocharged engines in the late 1970s (the reverse was the case), or that the original venue for the 1981 Las Vegas Grand Prix was to have been the Bellagio hotel (which was not built until 1998). Important names are misspelt, sometimes repeatedly, including those of the car dealer John Coombs (not Coomb), the Fiat boss Sergio Marchionne (not Marchione) and the engineer Alan Permane (not Permayne), who was "Witness X" in the notorious Crashgate hearings of 2009. These and other errors are mere details, perhaps, in Bower's attempt to paint a sweeping portrait of a very unorthodox tycoon, but they do tend to undermine faith in the description of more complex matters.

Perhaps nothing exemplifies Ecclestone's modus operandi as amusingly as the apparently coincidental publication, a couple of weeks before No Angel, of another biography. Susan Watkins, the wife of Formula One's long-time resident surgeon, is an old friend of Ecclestone and her book, completed in 2005, was intended to be the authorised version of his story. The subject, however, exercised his right to suppress the manuscript, which disappeared into limbo. Now, having granted Bower an unprecedented degree of access to his intimate circle, he has also quietly permitted the appearance of Bernie: The Biography of Bernie Ecclestone (Haynes), which inevitably paints him in an almost wholly favourable light. Thus, with the minimum of effort, a little thunder has been stolen from a book which had been expected, on Bower's past form, to contain more explosive revelations than turns out to be the case. Look after the small victories, Ecclestone might say, and the big ones will take care of themselves.

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2011/m ... wer-review ..... not that current but even proper journalists are hesitant to write negative articles about some 'influential' worms.

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Re: People that the world might be better off without

Postby MGV12 » Mon Oct 27, 2014 1:33 pm

.......

Him.jpg


On reflection I have so say this does have hints of a certain political leader ... it is in fact my first wife's uncle Boris. He was a nasty piece of business ... fortunately she didn't have his looks in the genes department ... just his attitude! :roll: :evil:
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Re: People that the world might be better off without

Postby MGV12 » Mon Oct 27, 2014 1:44 pm

.......

Himmm.jpg
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Re: People that the world might be better off without

Postby Mike Judd » Wed Nov 05, 2014 2:34 pm

Perhaps you guys might want to read this ,Just Goggle "All Wars are Banker's War's " I thought it was quite enlightening , of course that depends on whether it is all factually correct,although the historical events depicted certainly happened. I have to agree with the author though that who ever profits from wars it's certainly not the man in the street, he just does the dying. :roll: :roll: :roll:
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Re: People that the world might be better off without

Postby MGV12 » Thu Nov 06, 2014 6:41 pm

How many these have really dedicated their lives to making life better for the rest of us?

Park named 46th most powerful person in Forbes list

South Korean President Park Geun-hye was named the 46th most powerful person in the world by Forbes magazine on Wednesday, three notches ahead of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and 17 notches ahead of Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

Russian President Vladimir Putin topped the list of the 72 most powerful people in the world, followed by U.S. President Barack Obama, Chinese President Xi Jinping, Pope Francis and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, according to the Forbes website.

Putin was the most powerful person for the second straight year.

"No one would call Vladimir Putin, a good guy," the magazine said, citing Russia's annexation of Crimea and what it called an "ugly proxy war" in Ukraine. "As the undisputed, unpredictable and unaccountable head of an energy-rich, nuclear-tipped state, no one would ever call him weak."

Among women, Park was the fifth most powerful after Merkel (in fifth place), U.S. Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen (in sixth place), Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (in 31st place), and Christine Lagarde (in 33rd place), managing director of the International Monetary Fund.

"Park has been busy meeting her fellow world leaders, most notably Pope Francis and Xi Jinping, the first time a new Chinese leader visited Seoul ahead of Pyongyang," the magazine said.

"Bested only by China and Japan when it comes to regional wealth, Park helms a $1.4 trillion economy, No. 13 in the world."

Forbes put Abe in 63rd place, saying he is "struggling" after being elected as prime minister for the second time in 2012.

North Korean leader Kim, who was in the 49th place in the overall list, was the second most powerful young person after Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, who took the 22nd place in the overall list.

"The 31-year-old has absolute authority over the rusting 'hermit kingdom' of 25 million citizens running on an estimated $14 billion economy, fueled mostly with trade with China and South Korea," Forbes said.

Samsung Electronics Chairman Lee Kun-hee and his son Lee Jae-yong both were ranked in 35th place, while U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon was in 40th place and World Bank President Kim Yong in 45th place, according to the magazine. (Yonhap)

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20141106000188

Hard to say which on the actual Forbes list of 'most powerful' people rings the loudest 'wake up' bell .......

http://www.forbes.com/powerful-people/list/#tab:overall

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Re: People that the world might be better off without

Postby Mike Judd » Fri Nov 07, 2014 4:56 am

Janet Yellen is an interesting one ,although no wonder as she heads the U.S. Federal Reserve which to all accounts is not owned by the U.S. government but privately owned and merrily prints U.S. dollars ,lends them to The U.S. government when ever they are short, and charges them (The Taxpayers) interest. Now if that isn't a nice little arrangement I don't know what is.? No wonder China wants to change the system. Then maybe I have it all wrong again, I am quite willing to be enlightened. :? :?
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Re: People that the world might be better off without

Postby Roger Ramjet » Fri Nov 07, 2014 6:01 am

Mike Judd wrote:Janet Yellen is an interesting one ,although no wonder as she heads the U.S. Federal Reserve which to all accounts is not owned by the U.S. government but privately owned and merrily prints U.S. dollars ,lends them to The U.S. government when ever they are short, and charges them (The Taxpayers) interest. Now if that isn't a nice little arrangement I don't know what is.

Mike,
Congratulations, you have it right.
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Re: People that the world might be better off without

Postby Mike Judd » Fri Nov 07, 2014 1:01 pm

Mike,
Congratulations, you have it right.

Well I never really thought other wise :wink: :wink: but don't they have the Internet in the U.S. I have always found the Americans I have met ,although a trifle parochial as far as the rest of the world is concerned , fairly down to earth and sensible . But why have they put up with such blatant rip offs for so long.? I have asked a cousin in Phili about it, and she said they know but there is nothing they can do about it. Their Political system seems to be stuffed ,in spite of living in the Land of the Free. :( :(
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Re: People that the world might be better off without

Postby Andyfteeze » Sat Nov 08, 2014 8:18 am

Yep stuffed is the right word. They elect a president to run the country then they elect the opposite party in BOTH chambers. Witness the problem now! With total adversarial opposition the rage in USA and AUS, is it surprising they are marking time? I suppose that means the only tool Presidents have for improving the economy is to go to war :roll:
I was going to nominate G Bush and Sara Palin, but what the hell, YANKS deserve each other :lol:
Really, apart from a few mass killers, why bother? A french president once said " if you marry the mistress , you create a vacancy"
Kill one arsehole and another steps forward. :oops:
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Re: People that the world might be better off without

Postby pipoz » Sat Nov 15, 2014 2:58 pm

Now here is one for the politically correct

Amanda Vanstone: Full of bullshit and an insult to human intelligence. What a fat ignorant cow, she is.

How lucky we are, that we managed to vote her out of public office. However, she still manages to sponge of the taxpayer :lol: :idea:

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Re: People that the world might be better off without

Postby Klondyke » Sat Nov 15, 2014 9:30 pm

Who does truly believe that all the big guys (also the invisible ones) are awaiting what the one "elected" will tell them what to do?
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Re: People that the world might be better off without

Postby Andyfteeze » Mon Nov 17, 2014 12:49 am

Problem is we didnt get them all last election. We got Mirabella out but the ugly witch is now house speaker ( spanker) :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: i know we shouldnt judge on looks, but honestly, who does she appeal to?
Not picking on women here :roll: understand, just brain dead people in power. 8)
Saw Mirabella on a few programs and the s**t From her mouth made me cringe. She was a standout!
But the tide is turning, people are finally realising where the neocon gravy train is heading, and it doesnt look like a train station. More like a cliff. To copy a phrase from Keating, "the arseholes we had to have" :lol: :lol: :lol:
Barnaby Joyce, good ol Yesemety Sam him self. ( laughing at the image already) ah politicians, loverly people, NOT!
Allan Joyce, head of Qantas. An Irish blow in who has set about to destroy qantas. Got very close this year, never mind , maybe next time. :lol:
The head of ACCA, Rod Sims. "Competition boss Rod Sims says the federal government must rip up the rules that give the national broadband network monopoly protection before splitting up its divisions and selling them off"
NBN wS supposed to give everyone in australia the most modern internet , future proof and a level playing field for ALL australians. If you live in the country, forget about modern communications for another half a century. You know the neo cons have control when the arsehole looking after our interests puts s**t like this out.
Never mind Malcolm " dont stand in my way of a buck" Turnbull is giving us Fraudband.
It wont be long before we sell off all the roads. That will give us full competition too, yea right. :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:
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Re: People that the world might be better off without

Postby Roger Ramjet » Wed May 13, 2015 9:15 am

There are many quotes I'd like to print with this headline and story, but sufficient to say it would never happen here: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-05-13/n ... es/6466174
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Re: People that the world might be better off without

Postby MGV12 » Wed May 27, 2015 11:14 am

How does someone who is hated, even despised, by the majority of football fans stay in charge of taking the sport in the wrong direction for so long?

Maybe we should ask Bernie Ecclestone for an opinion as they appear to be birds of a feather!

Corrupt to the core.

Sepp Blatter wants to continue as FIFA president not for the good of football but because he fears the "emptiness" of life away from the sport's world governing body, Michel Platini has said.

Ahead of Friday's FIFA presidential election, Platini -- the head of European governing body UEFA -- gave an interview to L'Equipe newspaper published Monday, where he outlined his opposition to a Blatter fifth term.

"He is simply scared of the future, as he has given his life to the institution, to the point where he now identifies himself fully with FIFA," Platini said, referring to Blatter.

"I understand the fear of that emptiness that he must have; it's natural. But if he really loves FIFA, he should have put its interests ahead of his own."


.................

ZURICH — Swiss authorities began an extraordinary early-morning operation here Wednesday to arrest several top soccer officials and extradite them to the United States on federal corruption charges.

As leaders of FIFA, soccer’s global governing body, gathered for their annual meeting, Swiss law enforcement officials arrived unannounced at the Baur au Lac hotel, an elegant five-star property with views of the Alps and Lake Zurich. The arrests were made at the request of the United States Justice Department, which brought charges in the Eastern District of New York, based in Brooklyn, according to law enforcement officials.

Prosecutors planned to unseal an indictment soon against more than 10 officials, not all of whom are in Zurich, three law enforcement officials said. The charges include wire fraud, racketeering and money laundering.

The arrests were a startling blow to FIFA, a multibillion-dollar organization that governs the world’s most popular sport but has been plagued by accusations of bribery for decades.

The inquiry is also a major threat to Sepp Blatter, FIFA’s longtime president who is generally recognized as the most powerful person in sports, though law enforcement officials said he was not charged. An election, seemingly pre-ordained to give him a fifth term as president, is scheduled for Friday.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/27/sport ... 31730&_r=0

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Re: People that the world might be better off without

Postby MGV12 » Thu May 28, 2015 8:19 am

Sepp Blatter is as hard to nail as Osama Bin Laden but you can't take FIFA's president out with a bullet

James Comey, director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, stood at the podium, an upright, imposing figure, and delivered a message of purest hope. ‘This may be the way things are,’ he said, ‘but this is not the way things have to be.’ He sounded, for a moment, like Gary Cooper.

‘Every line in his face spelled honesty,’ Frank Capra said of Cooper, and set against the villainous toads of FIFA, Comey had that about him, too. He is 6ft 8in, the tallest member of the Obama administration, the tallest FBI director there has been and he will need to be big, from here. It is hard to imagine a slipperier, more nefarious bunch than the men in charge of football.

They are brazen, they are shameless, they are flagrant in their contempt for law. They twist the rules of the countries they visit, they manipulate, they conspire, they corrupt and diminish. Their leader is a tawdry, Machiavellian politico with the air of one who feels arrogantly insulated against society’s rules.

Some fall for him, some simply live in his pocket. He is kept in power by a network of palm greasers, tinpot dictators and sycophants, some of the most odious slugs ever to grace the VVIP seats of a football stadium.

It says something for the FIFA lifestyle that one V was not good enough. Here are people who see themselves as incredibly powerful and impossibly important. These are the people that the FBI’s Gary Cooper must now take down.

A few of them are in custody already. Hiding behind the hotel sheets raised by lackeys as they were herded into vehicles following dawn raids at their five-star establishment in Zurich. Squirming and now haggling over their extradition orders, shielded briefly by the legal process.

Sepp Blatter may even have the front to stand for his fifth term. The FBI haven’t got to him, yet.

That is part of the hope: that these men will rat each other out under questioning, turn grass as America’s FIFA representative Chuck Blazer did, allowing the net to spread wider and wider, until even the biggest catch will be within reach.

Not just Blatter, but that whole lousy 2018 and 2022 business as well. The World Cup awards to Russia and Qatar that everyone presumes were corrupted, but few believe can be altered.

Unsurprisingly, it was these rogue decisions that FIFA rushed to protect. The venues of the 2018 World Cup and 2022 World Cup would stand, they said. There would be no revote. It was the first of many attempts to ensure the watching millions that it was FIFA business as usual. The election would go ahead as planned, Herr Blatter’s coronation would go ahead as planned, the Congress would proceed as normal and these arrests were, in essence, nothing to do with the governing body.

At one stage, it was claimed FIFA were the suffering party. This is what they do. Style it out. See what they can get away with. Their premises should be surrounded by villagers with burning torches right now. They should be pursuing Blatter and his monstrous creation through the streets in hokey horror movie fashion.

Instead, considering the events of the last 24 hours, all is calm. FIFA have done their damnedest to convince us we are powerless against their machinations. As Comey said, it doesn’t have to be this way.

There was one problem with the press conference given by FIFA spokesman Walter De Gregorio. Just about every word that tumbled from his lips was a lie.

He was Comical Wally, claiming the FBI were not at the gates of the Baur au Lac hotel. This was a good day for FIFA, he said. No, it wasn’t. FIFA welcomes this process. No, it doesn’t. This is all part of FIFA’s reforms. Are they kidding? FIFA has not made a single step towards reform unless backed into a corner.

On September 5, 2014, the report by lawyer Michael Garcia into corruption within the organisation was submitted to FIFA. Two months later, on November 13, FIFA issued a summary of it which Garcia rejected as ‘materially incomplete’ and ‘misrepresenting the facts and conclusions’. So, five days later, FIFA filed criminal charges against ‘persons unknown’ at the Office of the Attorney General in Switzerland.

This made FIFA the injured party, joining the OAG in fighting against corruption and money laundering. It allowed Blatter’s spokesman to claim that ‘FIFA started all this’.

Yet a CNN report dated November 13 stated that the FBI was continuing its investigation into FIFA, despite the arrival of the Garcia report. In other words, once it became clear that the Garcia report was not going to serve as the hoped-for cover-up, FIFA had no choice but to flip the case and make itself the wronged party.

Yet why the five-day delay? Why do you think? Why would the organisation need five days before inviting the OAG in to peruse all files and paperwork?

Equally, if FIFA was in any way interested in affecting change, Blatter would not be standing for his fifth term. He has presided over an organisation in which bribery and corruption has proved to be endemic. He has seen close friends and allies exposed as liars and cheats. His regime has been dogged by arrests, resignations, investigations and smokescreens; one of the men led away — and now banned from all football activity — was Jeffrey Webb, FIFA vice-president and head of its internal audit committee. Yet somehow Blatter sails on.

This FBI investigation has taken seven years to come to fruition, but no warrant for Blatter. Maybe it is to come. One gets the feeling, though, FIFA’s president will be as difficult to nail as Osama bin Laden. Harder, perhaps, because it is not possible to take him out with a bullet.

The FBI must play Blatter at his own, sneaky, game. The United States department of justice is alleging ‘corruption that is rampant, systemic and deep-rooted both abroad and here in the United States’. It has taken place on Blatter’s watch, but still he clings to power.

His colleagues ‘have abused their positions of trust to acquire millions of dollars in bribes and kickbacks’ — and yet the man at the top takes no responsibility. Indeed, on Friday, he seeks votes.

And he will get them, by the sounds of it. UEFA officials met to discuss strategy for Friday’s presidential election. It was decided that if they believed the opposition candidate, Prince Ali bin Al-Hussein of Jordan, had a chance of winning they would urge their members to vote for him; if they thought Blatter would win, they would campaign to postpone the election.

UEFA issued a statement calling for FIFA to postpone the vote. As Blatter is no doubt working off the same vox pops he is unlikely to pay heed. He released a statement that contained the mot juste on the day’s events. He described them as ‘unfortunate’.

His admirers say this is Blatter’s brilliance. By making FIFA one nation, one vote, he has rendered the West powerless. His base is in Africa, in Central and South America, in parts of Asia, too.

He courts the outliers, the disenfranchised, and they compare him to Nelson Mandela, and with a straight face. Of course, some people thought Saddam Hussein knew how to play the West as well. Maybe Blatter has also got too clever for his own good. Even so, if he is returned tomorrow it will seem like a reverse for the FBI and the straight-shooters. A £100m bribe scandal and it hasn’t even touched him.

Yet. Hasn’t touched him yet. For now is the time to recall Comey’s words. It doesn’t have to be this way. And it doesn’t.

It is possible that, despite appearances, the FBI are right now listening to confessions or sifting through evidence that will, one day, make Blatter’s FIFA position untenable.

It is possible that there are brave men inside national associations, who are contemplating joint action, maybe even a boycott of a major tournament, to bring this crisis to a head. It is possible that FIFA’s brand is turning so toxic that sponsors will ultimately withdraw, taking with them the money that fuels the monster.

It may be that there is a hand waiting to knock on Blatter’s door, with the warrant that will bring an end to his rogue regime, his five-star North Korea, his evil empire. That is the hope. This is FIFA’s high noon, the FBI are Gary Cooper and the bad guys will surely get it in the end.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/footba ... ullet.html

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