Brick built gazebo conversion

For general discussion of:
1.) Project management or other professionals used during the project.
2.) Anything related to house design tools and applications. This would be an area to share and get feedback on your ideas for a house plan.
3.) Architectural styles used within Thailand.

Moderators: Sometimewoodworker, MGV12, BKKBILL

Brick built gazebo conversion

Postby wysiwyg » Sat Aug 05, 2017 1:39 pm

We built a double-wide car port a few years ago where one half had a raised floor with a view to being the front garden gazebo. Plans change and since it has never been used for the original purpose, it has become an open storage area. I plan on converting it to my off-premises 'man cave' and looking for suggestions and advice for wall construction, windows/doors. It will either need new roof tiles unless some are simply displaced as well as roof insulation but the steel frame should still be OK. It is already internally vaulted so high enough despite the exterior wall openings being 2 m high. The big decision would be the walls where I reckon I have a choice of standard double-row red brick (like the main house that was built over 10 years ago) or the newer Q-con brick and derivatives. There will be no heavy loading on the walls beyond a small air conditioner. Only planning on having windows on two walls, a door on the third and possibly just inserting a row of glass bricks high on the west-facing wall which gets a lot of sun.

Three of the walls have short ceramic patio columns with a tile-topped cement balustrade at 60 cm high. I was thinking that this lower part could be red-bricked in to save on costs and use the Q-con for the upper part of these 3 window-bearing walls (1.4 m from balustrade top to ceiling). The two longest walls are 2 m high x 3.7 m long. Otherwise, I could break out the columns and balustrades and brick it all with the same type bricks. I would think Q-con for the wall with the door which will be on the current fully open side of the gazebo, 2 m high x 2.7 m wide. I will probably go with a sliding uPVC door.

Plenty choices for windows and doors in Udon compared with over 10 years ago so looking for advice on what brands/type provide the best dust-proof sealing. When we built the main house, we went with the standard box aluminium frames (as uPVC was new and very expensive 10 years ago up here) but we have big issues with dust in the main house. If the man cave can be dust-free, i will probably change all the windows in the main house to match. See attached pictures.

Thanks for your consideration and input.

P_20170805_123652 (Small).jpg
gazebo and car port

P_20170805_123710 (Small).jpg
gazebo se view

P_20170805_123744 (Small).jpg
gazebo s view

P_20170805_123849 (Small).jpg
gazebo sw view
wysiwyg
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Apr 09, 2017 10:07 am

Re: Brick built gazebo conversion

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Sun Aug 06, 2017 3:29 pm

The best material for walls is AAC block, it's fast to build, light, water resistant, heat resistant, and cheap. It's cheaper than red brick once you add in the sand, cement and labour.

In our current house the main source of dust is the ceiling, if you have a suspended ceiling using the standard square panels that will be where you dust is getting in.
Sometimewoodworker
 
Posts: 1853
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 1:22 pm
Location: Non Sa-At / Tokyo

Re: Brick built gazebo conversion

Postby wysiwyg » Tue Aug 15, 2017 7:09 pm

Sometimewoodworker wrote:The best material for walls is AAC block, it's fast to build, light, water resistant, heat resistant, and cheap. It's cheaper than red brick once you add in the sand, cement and labour.

In our current house the main source of dust is the ceiling, if you have a suspended ceiling using the standard square panels that will be where you dust is getting in.

Thanks for the block recommendation. I assume that it's now readily available around Muang Udon Thani? is there any brand that has a better reputation for quality? Since it's a relatively small construction, I probably don't need the best and most expensive.

I don't have a suspended ceiling in the main house so ruling that out. I still reckon it could be all coming through the really poor sealing on the sliding aluminium windows as the sliding mossie screens on the inside get dusty very quickly. The floors are all cement with ceramic over the lounge, kitchen, WC's and annex but the 3 main bedrooms have laminate over the cement. Floors never seem too dusty but desktops, shelves all get dusty and grimy really quick.
wysiwyg
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Apr 09, 2017 10:07 am

Re: Brick built gazebo conversion

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Tue Aug 15, 2017 7:54 pm

wysiwyg wrote:
Sometimewoodworker wrote:The best material for walls is AAC block, it's fast to build, light, water resistant, heat resistant, and cheap. It's cheaper than red brick once you add in the sand, cement and labour.

In our current house the main source of dust is the ceiling, if you have a suspended ceiling using the standard square panels that will be where you dust is getting in.

Thanks for the block recommendation. I assume that it's now readily available around Muang Udon Thani? is there any brand that has a better reputation for quality? Since it's a relatively small construction, I probably don't need the best and most expensive.

I don't have a suspended ceiling in the main house so ruling that out. I still reckon it could be all coming through the really poor sealing on the sliding aluminium windows as the sliding mossie screens on the inside get dusty very quickly. The floors are all cement with ceramic over the lounge, kitchen, WC's and annex but the 3 main bedrooms have laminate over the cement. Floors never seem too dusty but desktops, shelves all get dusty and grimy really quick.


Is your ceiling this style
IMG_1681-2.jpeg
?

As to AAC blocks just buy by price, you should be able to vet neat 15 Baht each of 75mm blocks. Due to the way they are made there is no real variation in quality
Sometimewoodworker
 
Posts: 1853
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 1:22 pm
Location: Non Sa-At / Tokyo

Re: Brick built gazebo conversion

Postby Klondyke » Wed Aug 16, 2017 9:01 am

In case you want to be on a cheaper way for a simple house/room - and you will make use of simple village workers (chaang pun) - you can buy cinder blocks 40x20x7cm, available in every village for 5 - 6 baht, the workers will be happy with it.

The wall exposed to sunshine (or better all of them) to lay in two vertical layers with distance in-between 3 - 4 cm, thus avoiding the transfer of the outside blocks heat onto the inner block. You will appreciate a Cool Thai House, in comparison with a single wall.
Klondyke
 
Posts: 339
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2014 10:40 pm

Re: Brick built gazebo conversion

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Wed Aug 16, 2017 10:42 am

Klondyke wrote:In case you want to be on a cheaper way for a simple house/room - and you will make use of simple village workers (chaang pun) - you can buy cinder blocks 40x20x7cm, available in every village for 5 - 6 baht, the workers will be happy with it.

The wall exposed to sunshine (or better all of them) to lay in two vertical layers with distance in-between 3 - 4 cm, thus avoiding the transfer of the outside blocks heat onto the inner block. You will appreciate a Cool Thai House, in comparison with a single wall.


The low price of the cinder block does not make them cheaper to build a wall with (even less so if you build a double wall), you need a lot of cement and sand as well and by now most villagers are familiar with building using AAC blocks.
Sometimewoodworker
 
Posts: 1853
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 1:22 pm
Location: Non Sa-At / Tokyo


Return to House Design, Architecture & Project Management

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest