wood floors

Almost everything that needs to be said about concrete, cement, hand-mixing, uses and prices has been said on this forum. Please check out the contributions before posting new questions.

Moderators: Sometimewoodworker, MGV12, BKKBILL, pattayapope

wood floors

Postby chorizo » Sat Sep 09, 2006 12:59 am

What is the correct way to install a teak or redwood floor? Does it "glue" right to the cement? I have been told this is the way unless it is over 45 cm long, and then it sits on wood slats, seems like it would flex as you walk on it if you weigh more than a Thai.
And will the concrete floor have moisture that eventually will cause a problem.?
Thanks for helping....
chorizo
 
Posts: 37
Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 7:45 pm
Location: chiangmai

Re: wood floors

Postby cruzing » Sat Sep 09, 2006 10:33 am

chorizo wrote:What is the correct way to install a teak or redwood floor? Does it "glue" right to the cement? I have been told this is the way unless it is over 45 cm long, and then it sits on wood slats, seems like it would flex as you walk on it if you weigh more than a Thai.
And will the concrete floor have moisture that eventually will cause a problem.?
Thanks for helping....


When some thai friends down south were fitting out their penthouse, I saw the workers installing the wood floors on top of concrete. They installed a wood bracing underneath the main floor of "2X4's". The "2X4's" were laid edgewise. (2 inch side to the floor) After the base/subfloor was installed they then proceeded to lay the floor. This is the only wood floor I've seen installed over here. I walked on their floor at a later visit and you would never know it had been installed that way. Very sturdy.

Cruzing
cruzing
 
Posts: 470
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2005 10:25 am
Location: Na Jomtien, Sattahip

Re: wood floors

Postby svenivan » Sun Sep 10, 2006 8:16 am

chorizo wrote:What is the correct way to install a teak or redwood floor? Does it "glue" right to the cement? I have been told this is the way unless it is over 45 cm long, and then it sits on wood slats, seems like it would flex as you walk on it if you weigh more than a Thai.
And will the concrete floor have moisture that eventually will cause a problem.?
Thanks for helping....


Hi Chorizo,
When I rebuilt my house I bought a very expensive parquettefloor for the livingroom and master bedroom. The size is 37x9 cm of each piece and they glued right on the cement.
This is one of the few bad mistakes in our rebuilding. Of course the concrete has moisture (even if the house and the concrete is almost ten years old) and it has affected the whole floor.
If we hade choosed the small type of parquette, 19x4 cm, then I think it would have been better.
svenivan
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 12:34 am
Location: Chiang Rai

Postby teletiger » Fri Sep 15, 2006 12:04 am

Hmmmm, you've got me worried now Svenivan. We laid our parquet floor last week, on a month old concrete floor. I brought up the subject of dampness with the builder. He showed me the tar-based resin glue and said it was water-proof. Time will tell I suppose.
Attachments
DSC01060.jpg
teletiger
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2005 3:47 pm
Location: Khao Yai

Re: wood floors

Postby prufrock » Sun May 20, 2007 10:50 pm

chorizo wrote:What is the correct way to install a teak or redwood floor? Does it "glue" right to the cement? I have been told this is the way unless it is over 45 cm long, and then it sits on wood slats, seems like it would flex as you walk on it if you weigh more than a Thai.
And will the concrete floor have moisture that eventually will cause a problem.?
Thanks for helping....


Actually the best method is to embed in the wet cement, a series of wood sections of about 5cm x 10cm x 'Z'cm in length; 'Z' being the distance from wall to wall. Cover the concrete with a construction thick-gauge plastic, taped or glued at the edges to prevent 'wicking' of moisture to your new overlay of teak/wood flooring.
Attachments
SL700043 256.jpg
SL700042 256.jpg
wood sections embedded in cement floor to facilitate attaching a wooden floor
LTD
prufrock
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2005 11:28 am

Re: wood floors

Postby thaifly » Thu May 24, 2007 9:02 am

prufrock wrote:
chorizo wrote:What is the correct way to install a teak or redwood floor? Does it "glue" right to the cement? I have been told this is the way unless it is over 45 cm long, and then it sits on wood slats, seems like it would flex as you walk on it if you weigh more than a Thai.
And will the concrete floor have moisture that eventually will cause a problem.?
Thanks for helping....


Actually the best method is to embed in the wet cement, a series of wood sections of about 5cm x 10cm x 'Z'cm in length; 'Z' being the distance from wall to wall. Cover the concrete with a construction thick-gauge plastic, taped or glued at the edges to prevent 'wicking' of moisture to your new overlay of teak/wood flooring.
gidday pruflock ....thai fly from mae rim i have just recently done my floors and u are spot on as my was done the same way except forthe plastic etc my builder used cpac easy cement st210..and180 mix instead and my builder i am using is so far bullet proof thai fly mae rim
thaifly
 
Posts: 825
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2007 8:29 pm
Location: mae rim...chiang mai

wood in concrete

Postby chorizo » Sun May 27, 2007 9:57 am

Question guys...on the wood embedded in concrete...after a few years , does the concrete eat at the wood ?What kind of wood ? I did a patio with redwood (USA)dividing Concrete into sections and after about 5-6 years , the wood came apart.
I do understand the windows are embedded in concrete, and there is usually not a problem there?
I also assume the flooring is 60cm or longer to need the wood suport ? Mine will only be 45cm and had planned to glue down with the tar base resin glue.
great site here, i have learned alot. In process o building now.
Thanks, Chorizo
chorizo
 
Posts: 37
Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 7:45 pm
Location: chiangmai

glueing floors

Postby chorizo » Sun May 27, 2007 10:46 am

My California friend, used to install wood floors part-time. He said on houses on a slab(no basement) , that they glued a cheap grade linoleum to the concrete ( for moisture barrier) and then glued wood flooring to that. Never had a problem with any coming up. Not sure of the glue...Just another way to do it.....
Chorizo.....
chorizo
 
Posts: 37
Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 7:45 pm
Location: chiangmai

Re: wood floors

Postby bombdefuzer » Sun Mar 29, 2009 6:22 am

I want to install a wood laminate flooring over the tile in my house. Has anyone done this or have any recommendations?
bombdefuzer
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Mar 29, 2009 6:20 am

Re: wood floors

Postby thaifly » Sun Mar 29, 2009 10:49 am

prufrock wrote:


Actually the best method is to embed in the wet cement, a series of wood sections of about 5cm x 10cm x 'Z'cm in length; 'Z' being the distance from wall to wall. Cover the concrete with a construction thick-gauge plastic, taped or glued at the edges to prevent 'wicking' of moisture to your new overlay of teak/wood flooring.[/quote]
gidday thomas..its the thai fly from mae rim..was your floor done the same way?????thanks to the bomb diffuser for finding this post..as it refresh my memory that i did a post on it confirming prueflocks method.....ITS A BLAST OF a gidday to all ...its the thaifly from mae rim
thaifly
 
Posts: 825
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2007 8:29 pm
Location: mae rim...chiang mai

Re: wood in concrete

Postby geordie » Mon Mar 30, 2009 9:57 am

[quote="chorizo"]Question guys...on the wood embedded in concrete...after a few years , does the concrete eat at the wood ?What kind of wood ? I did a patio with redwood (USA)dividing Concrete into sections and after about 5-6 years , the wood came apart.
Chorizo[/quote

asuming the patio was exposed to the elements its probably water rotted the timber??
my comments may be wrong but never deliberately
If it aint broke, dont fix it
User avatar
geordie
 
Posts: 3867
Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2008 4:39 am

Re: wood floors

Postby jazzman » Mon Mar 30, 2009 8:49 pm

bombdefuzer wrote:I want to install a wood laminate flooring over the tile in my house. Has anyone done this or have any recommendations?


Hi Bombdefuser, and welcome on board.

Modern laminate floors are usually laid as a 'floating' floor. If the floor is perfectly flat with no large bumps or depressions, normally bitumen paper or PCV sheeting is laid over the substrate, and then a layer of felt that is sold specially for laminate or fake parquet flooring. The thickness of the felt takes care of any unevenness of the tiles or substrate or if the tiles are not perfectly smooth. If the floor is not flat from end to end and from side to side, it should be leveled by pouring specialself leveling mortar over it.
The strips of laminate are usually tongue & groove, and a special claw tool is used to insert the last boards near the skirting.
If the height of the new floor is likely to interfere with the doors or thresholds, it may be better to rip the old tiles out.
How to build a $20,000 / £14,000 house and a $???? MOTEL Updated 21 March 09 - with BOQ and costs
Don't let this happen in YOUR house.
jazzman
 
Posts: 2161
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:11 pm
Location: Thailand

Re: wood floors

Postby bombdefuzer » Mon Mar 30, 2009 9:07 pm

Thanks jazzman.
bombdefuzer
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Mar 29, 2009 6:20 am

Re: wood floors

Postby libranmale51 » Sun Sep 06, 2009 5:36 pm

ive been reading this post with some interest, i am a registered builder here in Australia and wishing to move to Thailand at some stage so building a new house was an option id rather to living in a condo, firstly i dont like floating floors because they dont like water...there normally a veneered manufactured board \and contury to what the salesman might say they are not water proof if you spring a leak and the water cant get away quickly the boards warp, an old girl friend had to pull up her hall boards casue her son left the bathroom basin to overflow one morning and was too slow in moping up.There are a few other things about them i dont like as well but it is a personal thing so i wont go on too much about it.
The 2 main ways to lay strip flooring here (your normal everyday floor board) over a concert slap is either of the following ways you can nail batterns directly to the concrete slab by pre drilling with an impact drill then useing a special galvanized nail with a heavy plastic moisture barrier between, there is no mandatory size battern but 35mm is common here, then you just glue and nail the floor board to the batterns as if its on timber joists, walking over a floor like this one you get a kinda echoing sound its not unpleasant and after a short time you wont notice.
The way i prefer and used on my own house is first a water proof sealer is rolled over the area to have floor boards (2 coats 1 day apart) the 3rd day i pre paint 12 mm ply sheet with an undercoat to the side that will face the concrete floor, this isnt necessary but its extra insurance for moisture. Once dry you glue and nail ply sheets to concert floor using same fixings as if they were batterns only much shorter. Once that is completed you can begin to lay your timber flooring, 12mm timber floor boards are common here but i used 19 mm only casue thats what my suppler had in stock of that particular timber floor i wanted. You troul your glue over the ply (totally covering the ply, of course only enough that you can handle ) then place your timber flooring and nailing onto place.
This is just a quick out line of strip flooring over concert floors. Slap floors always should have a moisture barrier put in prior to pouring, and i would think the Thai engineers would call it up on there specs.
From my observations i think concert construction in a country like Thailand is wrong, im guessing its the cheapest way certainly for normal housing i think light weight cladding and floors off the ground work best.
Reading "the coolthaihouse" and looking at the pics and reading the notes i cant for the life of me understand why you would put heavy concrete tiles on your roof all that concrete just radiated heat 24/7. I think minimizing concrete in the construction would be the way to go, i like timber but i expect its pricey over there...but steel can do what timber does and we do have several builders here who build steel framed houses.
libranmale51
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun Sep 06, 2009 8:26 am


Return to cement, concrete and mortar

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron