Sandwash

Almost everything that needs to be said about concrete, cement, hand-mixing, uses and prices has been said on this forum. Please check out the contributions before posting new questions.

Moderators: Sometimewoodworker, MGV12, BKKBILL, pattayapope

Sandwash

Postby MGV12 » Mon Dec 13, 2010 10:22 am

Copied across from "What is a good driveway cement?"

MGV12 wrote:I have been very happy with the sandwash applied to columns and the carport floor in my place and the prices were reasonable at 270 Baht/M2 using grey cement and 430 Baht/M2 [with a different grit] for white cement ..... all in.

Sandwash.jpg
My place


When you start talking fancy designs as in the pic below the price usually goes through the roof.

sandwash thailand.jpg
Library pic
sandwash thailand.jpg (22.41 KiB) Viewed 1054 times


geordie wrote:hello mgv12 did not realise you had it done and not too bad a price i think jazzman said somwhere on a thread that they where charging 4/500 in the pattaya area how is it standing up to car traffic and did you put a sealer over it


MGV12 wrote:Hi geordie .... we did get one quote for standard 'yellow' sandwash of 250 Baht/M2 but the guy wasn't too convincing and so we went with the other one who was very professional ... brought sample pieces of the actual finishes he offered and arrived with a team who were all good at applying it. My opinion is that it's best, as with the ceiling work, to go for a specialist team who are doing this work day in day out as there is an 'art' to it if you are looking for a perfect finish. As it's just a car parking area and not a driveway it just gets the in/out wear and tear and no wheel turning which does apply a lot more stress to the surface ... we have blockwork to the outside area. The side I don't work on still looks great after a power wash but would probably stay that way longer if it was sealed.

It has been on for 9 months and as an experiment to see how it stands up ... as I have seen conflicting reports ... I did not seal it. The columns look great and there is no sign of wear on the floor but there is some discolouration as I still use one side as a workshop. With hindsight I would have sealed it straight off as the use of cement,paints and other products have left a few marks but most clean off well with the power washer and the odd stubborn area can be cleaned with the acid they use to wash off the excess surface cement when they apply the sandwash ... available from a local material shop. Anyone who uses it BE CAREFUL as it's strong stuff.

One other recommendation is to decide exactly what you want done and where as a 'one hit' job. The good teams will only take larger jobs ... the one we used had a minimum of 20,000 Baht otherwise "It's not worth our while' ... ours worked out at 23850 Baht. Afterwards there were some additional areas we wanted doing which would have been maybe 10,000 Baht but even as a previous customer they weren't interested ... mind you they are based about 40Kms from us. We are still looking for someone good to do the other stuff as a couple of guys who did come to look 'took the Mickey' on their quotes.

“Some days I am an optimistic pessimist ... other days I am a pessimistic optimist”
User avatar
MGV12
 
Posts: 5349
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 4:23 pm
Location: Chiang Mai

Re: Sandwash

Postby glennb6 » Mon Mar 14, 2011 5:16 am

MGV12,

I life in Florida and perhaps soon in Tland, however I do some decorative concrete work in Florida and have been very interested in this Sandwash. Only way I've known exposed ag to be done is pour and surface wash. Having seen it all over Tland (including on vertical surfaces) it's obvious that it's not poured but more likely troweled on an then exposed. If you have any contacts or info on the process, if you could pass it on as I'd like to do this commercially in Florida.

thks
glennb6
glennb6
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2011 5:09 am

Re: Sandwash

Postby MGV12 » Mon Mar 14, 2011 1:27 pm

glennb6 wrote:MGV12,

I life in Florida and perhaps soon in Tland, however I do some decorative concrete work in Florida and have been very interested in this Sandwash. Only way I've known exposed ag to be done is pour and surface wash. Having seen it all over Tland (including on vertical surfaces) it's obvious that it's not poured but more likely troweled on an then exposed. If you have any contacts or info on the process, if you could pass it on as I'd like to do this commercially in Florida.

thks
glennb6


Hi Glenn

I can't really assist a great deal except to say that the technique used here is very simple:

They mix up the mortar/render mix with the selected grit ... ranging from coarse sand through to small pebbles as desired ... and apple it by trowel usually about 1cm to maybe max 1.5cm thickness. Very much like applying a normal cement render or base plaster. As the applied mix starts to go off they simply us a wet sponge or soft bristle brush to remove the surplus cement mix and expose the aggregate. When it has dried any cement left on the surface can be removed with an acid wash. As with any such process getting the consistency of the mix correct is crucial but you would know that being in the business ... they did include a little plasticiser but I can't say I noticed them introducing anything special in the way of additives.

I don't have any contacts other than small teams who work locally and I doubt they would be of any use to you.

Sorry I can't help more ... good luck

“Some days I am an optimistic pessimist ... other days I am a pessimistic optimist”
User avatar
MGV12
 
Posts: 5349
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 4:23 pm
Location: Chiang Mai


Return to cement, concrete and mortar

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest