MY HOUSE IN KORAT

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MY HOUSE IN KORAT

Postby JASONTHAI » Sat Feb 17, 2007 1:17 am

Hi here's a picture of the house I am building at the moment in Korat
Where's my Chang beer
JASONTHAI
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2006 6:15 am
Location: CROYDON, ENGLAND

Postby JASONTHAI » Sat Feb 17, 2007 1:25 am

Sorry forgot to add the pics
Attachments
Picture 031.jpg
The big boss (my son)
Picture 067.jpg
This is only the first part of the house
Picture 067.jpg (11.32 KiB) Viewed 6179 times
Where's my Chang beer
JASONTHAI
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2006 6:15 am
Location: CROYDON, ENGLAND

Postby JASONTHAI » Sat Feb 17, 2007 1:35 am

And some more Pictures
Attachments
Picture 057.jpg
The frame of the roof is up
Picture 071.jpg
Me and the village drunk or should I say my drinking buddie
Picture 070.jpg
The village drunk (every village has one)
Picture 064.jpg
The roof being done
Where's my Chang beer
JASONTHAI
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2006 6:15 am
Location: CROYDON, ENGLAND

Postby jazzman » Sat Feb 17, 2007 11:07 pm

Looks as if it's going to be very nice Jason. 96 sq.m on each floor, certainly big enough for a family :)

I'd be interested to know the spec for your roof truss:
Kind of C-section steel
Kind of box - section steel
Spacing of rafters, 80 or 100 cm?
How to build a $20,000 / £14,000 house and a $???? MOTEL Updated 21 March 09 - with BOQ and costs
Don't let this happen in YOUR house.
jazzman
 
Posts: 2161
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:11 pm
Location: Thailand

Postby JASONTHAI » Sun Feb 18, 2007 12:35 am

jazzman wrote:Looks as if it's going to be very nice Jason. 96 sq.m on each floor, certainly big enough for a family :)

I'd be interested to know the spec for your roof truss:
Kind of C-section steel
Kind of box - section steel
Spacing of rafters, 80 or 100 cm?


Hi Jazzman the house is only on 1 floor but the picture you see is only half, the remaining half is getting built now, sorry I do not have any photo's yet of this as I am in England until next week when I go back, as regards to the roof I showed my builders a picture of the roof I wanted and the way I wanted the steel to be done, How do you know that this is 96 sq.m I have been trying to figure this out, but I keep adding more pillers as I think it is too small, in total there are 23 pillers at present each one is 2.5 metres apart, I could have gone for 3 - 3.5 metres apart but I was thinking of the weight of the roof and wanted to play safe and make sure I have enough surport for the roof
Attachments
Picture 059.jpg
view from the front ( on the right handside is where the shop will go) that's why there are 2 extra pillers there
Picture 056.jpg
view from the back
Picture 057.jpg
view of half the pillers
Where's my Chang beer
JASONTHAI
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2006 6:15 am
Location: CROYDON, ENGLAND

Postby jazzman » Sun Feb 18, 2007 8:21 am

Hi Jason,

I just naturally assumed that your pillars were spaced at a standard 3.5 m, counted them and worked out the square area between them. MY roof is 156 sq.m and has 18 pillars. There is never any fault in erring on the side of caution, it just costs more money (this was a slight mistake I made with my roof). A standard grid for pillars can easily be up to 4m and in my house I actually left out a pillar that would have annoyingly been in the middle of the living room. A little knowledge of the dynamics of struts - which is what a roof truss is all about - provides plenty of workarounds for carrying the weight. Roof design is not a question of supporting a dead weight, it is about sharing the load and transmitting it to the pillar tops.

I based my roof design
on the roof trusses that I had observed in many houses under construction. I had also sneaked in many times and taken photos. I also asked the workers what grade, size and section of steel they were using.

This proved an enormously worthwhile exercise because I came across two houses where the workers were running around like rats in a last ditch attempt to shore everything up before the whole lot collapsed around them. The ridge purlin and the rafters were visibly bending under the weight of the tiles. The CPAC tiles weigh about 4 kg each and that means you have about 8 ton of tiled above your head - the weight of eight medium sized motor cars :!:

I was able later to view an architect's spec and drawing of a roof truss that was similar my hip roof. I had planned to use the same spec for the steel, but to be on the safe side, unneccessarily as it turned out, I doubled the ridge purlin and the queen posts and and used full box section on the hip rafters.

One problem is, that 'builders' in rural areas often have little experience in building these 'modern' Thai houses. And as I found out with my house, they are sometimes unable to read even the best and biggest drawings. In true Thai tradition, if they do not understand, they will not ask, they will just go ahead and do it their way. The wrong way.

Many members of the coothaihouse forum agree that to set a team of builders onto a house project and to go away while it is being built can be courting disaster. Our two major problems occured when we were only away for a day or two :?
How to build a $20,000 / £14,000 house and a $???? MOTEL Updated 21 March 09 - with BOQ and costs
Don't let this happen in YOUR house.
jazzman
 
Posts: 2161
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:11 pm
Location: Thailand

Postby JASONTHAI » Mon Feb 19, 2007 2:24 am

Hi Jazzman I am not worried about not being there as they have only the basic jobs to do I will sort out the rest when I arrive, they will be finished in about a week so they will stop until my return also I have my wife out there to make sure everything is o.k if not she will ring me for advice, one question I have is that I want to build a wall around the house using the cheap 3.5 baht blocks the wall will be about 55 metres in total including 2 small enterance gates at the front and back and some fancy steel work at the front wall which is no bigger than 7 metres, I need to know the rough price for this, I have a budget of 60,000 for this will this be enough, see photo's below
Attachments
DSC00002.jpg
The front wall not including the big enterance gate for a car, just a wall the same as you see on the right
Picture_011.jpg
the wall around the sides and back
DSC05151.JPG
small gate I want at the front and back of the wall
Where's my Chang beer
JASONTHAI
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2006 6:15 am
Location: CROYDON, ENGLAND

Postby jazzman » Mon Feb 19, 2007 8:52 am

Hi Jason,

60,000 will not be enough if you want really fancy ironwork like the ones in the pictures.
It is easy enough to build the wall using the 3.5 baht 'cinder' blocks. This is how most walls are built. They are rendered on each side with another 1cm of cement . The capping is reinforced concrete which is cast into wooden formwork. 13 bricks are needed for one sq. m.; you have to decide how high up you want to go.

The posts will be spaced at 3 or 4 metres and can be built several ways and with the exception of pre-cast posts, there will always be reinforcing bars and conduit for a post-top lantern inside them. There is no point in going to the cost of building a wall and not making provision for the electrics at the same time. You can always buy the lanterns later. Don't be fooled by the small solar things, my father bought some at B&Q for round the lawn and within a year they had all packed up. The rechargeable batteries all need replacing every 9 months, and the little solar panels are made up of floor sweepings from the big jobs.

    Precast posts (no possiblity to incorporate electrics, rebar not contiguous with foundations/footings)
    Concrete drainpipes (quickest, easiest, cheapest, don't need rendering).
    Cinder block (nice for thick square posts, fill with concrete,need rendering).

Footings, usually 15 x 20 but 20 x 40 in some cases, have to be dug out and filled with concrete and rebar or formwork for the footings can also be built above ground with 'cinder' blocks like the footings for my house. The firmness of the ground and the proximity of the wall to an earth bank will determine how deep you have to go with the foundations for the posts. See http://www.coolthaihouse.com/cthpics/displayimage.php?pos=-55 and
http://www.coolthaihouse.com/cthpics/displayimage.php?pos=-54

You will only get the prices for the ironwork
by going to a local blacksmith with your design and asking for a quotation. Send your wife. She should not tell him she is married to a farang. Get THREE quotations from different blacksmiths. If you live in a large town or city it;s worth getting quotes from village metalworkers. ALL villages have one. The
ironwork in the photo could cost as much as 5,000 per module. Very basic ironwork could cost as little as 500. The fancy gates in the picture could cost as much as 20,000 baht for a pair.

Installation is always included in the price.

A very basic brick and concrete wall would cost upwards of 1,000 baht per linear metre icluding labour. This is unskilled labour and the kind of thing that could be done by one man over a period of time at 180 baht per day.
So 55,000 baht including labour, but no gates, no ironwork.

Based on some prices I know for medium cost solutions:
Bricks: 3,753 baht
Rebar: 8,234 baht
Cement: 5,499 baht
CPAC (6cu): 9,000 baht
Gates (pair): 17,000 baht
Ironwork (3 x 1.5):36,666
Cable 1.5 mm2: 233 baht
PVC Conduit: 3.262 baht
Paint, primer, one coat 38L: 1,300
Paint, topcoat, two coats 76L: 2,880
Labour: 10,000 baht

TOTAL: 97,827 Bhat.
Add a bit for sand, Nam Ya and sundries and budget 100,000 Baht.

ROOF STEEL
: I'm still interested in knowing the steel spec for your roof. This information will help a lot of members. I will be writing a 'sticky' about it soon and I would like to include your pic.
How to build a $20,000 / £14,000 house and a $???? MOTEL Updated 21 March 09 - with BOQ and costs
Don't let this happen in YOUR house.
jazzman
 
Posts: 2161
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:11 pm
Location: Thailand

Postby jazzman » Mon Feb 19, 2007 9:02 am

Hi Jason,

It's close, but 60,000 will not be enough if you want really fancy ironwork like the ones in the pictures.
It is easy enough to build the wall using the 3.5 baht 'cinder' blocks. This is how most walls are built. They are rendered on each side with another 1cm of cement . The capping is reinforced concrete which is cast into wooden formwork. 13 bricks are needed for one sq. m.; you have to decide how high up you want to go.

The posts will be spaced at 3 or 4 metres and can be built several ways and with the exception of pre-cast posts, there will always be reinforcing bars and conduit for a post-top lantern inside them. There is no point in going to the cost of building a wall and not making provision for the electrics at the same time. You can always buy the lanterns later. Don't be fooled by the small solar things, my father bought some at B&Q for round the lawn and within a year they had all packed up. The rechargeable batteries all need replacing every 9 months, and the little solar panels are made up of floor sweepings from the big jobs.

    Precast posts (no possiblity to incorporate electrics, rebar not contiguous with foundations/footings)
    Concrete drainpipes (quickest, easiest, cheapest, don't need rendering).
    Cinder block (nice for thick square posts, fill with concrete,need rendering) Like the corner post in your pic..

Footings, usually 15 x 20 but 20 x 40 in some cases, have to be dug out and filled with concrete and rebar or formwork for the footings can also be built above ground with 'cinder' blocks like the footings for my house. The firmness of the ground and the proximity of the wall to an earth bank will determine how deep you have to go with the foundations for the posts, this could increase your need for CPAC by 2cu.See http://www.coolthaihouse.com/cthpics/displayimage.php?pos=-55 and
http://www.coolthaihouse.com/cthpics/displayimage.php?pos=-54

You will only get the prices for the ironwork
by going to a local blacksmith with your design and asking for a quotation. Send your wife. She should not tell him she is married to a farang. Get THREE quotations from different blacksmiths. If you live in a large town or city it;s worth getting quotes from village metalworkers. ALL villages have one. The
ironwork in the photo could cost as much as 5,000 per module. Very basic ironwork could cost as little as 500. The fancy gates in the picture could cost as much as 20,000 baht for a pair.

Installation is always included in the price.

A very basic brick and concrete wall would cost upwards of 1,000 baht per linear metre icluding labour. This is unskilled labour and the kind of thing that could be done by one man over a period of time at 180 baht per day.
So 55,000 baht including labour, but no gates, no ironwork.

A very rough guide based on some prices I know for medium cost solutions:
Bricks: 3,753 baht
Rebar: 8,234 baht
Cement: 5,499 baht
CPAC (6cu): 9,000 baht
Gates (single, 2): 6,000 baht
Ironwork (3 x 1.5, 10 x 3m modules):10,185
Cable 1.5 mm2: 233 baht
PVC Conduit: 3.262 baht
Paint, primer, one coat 38L: 1,300
Paint, topcoat, two coats 76L: 2,880
Labour: 10,000 baht

TOTAL: 60,346 Bhat.
Add a bit for sand, Nam Ya and sundries and budget 65,000 Baht.

ROOF STEEL
: I'm still interested in knowing the steel spec for your roof. This information will help a lot of members. I will be writing a 'sticky' about it soon and I would like to include your pic.
How to build a $20,000 / £14,000 house and a $???? MOTEL Updated 21 March 09 - with BOQ and costs
Don't let this happen in YOUR house.
jazzman
 
Posts: 2161
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:11 pm
Location: Thailand

THE HOUSE IS FINISHED

Postby JASONTHAI » Thu May 03, 2007 8:50 pm

Well the house is finally finished only took 3 months, the house is 120 sq metres, it has 3 bedrooms, large bathroom & kitchen, separate room for the washing machine, large front room 30 sq metres of which 12.5 metres is our shop or the locals call it the mini mart, the shop is doing good business about 700 baht a day of which about 160 baht is profit so the shop should easy make 4900 baht a month profit plus we have the only large washing machine in the village so the locals bring there blankets to us to wash so we make about another 500 or so baht profit on top of the 4600, so we are nearly upto 5500 baht a month, which is not bad, the electric bill was 1200 baht last month, but I am expecting this to rise to near 2000 baht next month due to us not having the shop opened until the 8th April and also us getting a ice cream fridge a few days ago, the water bill for last month was 135 baht, I am expecting this to be 150 baht next month, so I am expecting to pay 2150 in bills next month which should leave me over 3300 baht for food & odd bits for the family for the month (which is enought for them in Korat), we will be selling food hopefully in a few months time, once I have finished building the wall & sorting out the garden, tables & chairs outside so I am hoping this will make us 1000 baht profit a month

Anyway here is some pictures of my house more will follow shortly
Attachments
Picture 093 (780 x 585).jpg
The Kitchen
Picture 092 (780 x 585).jpg
The Kitchen
Picture 090 (780 x 585).jpg
The front room and enterance
Picture 089 (780 x 585).jpg
The front room
Picture 087 (780 x 585).jpg
The side of the house
Where's my Chang beer
JASONTHAI
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2006 6:15 am
Location: CROYDON, ENGLAND

Postby Itchy » Fri May 04, 2007 9:44 pm

Thanks for posting Jason, reading how other people's plans are coming together so well keeps me motivated. My guess is I'm a good three or four years off starting our place in earnest, so I need all the motivation I can get.

Oh and best wishes for continuing good fortune in your new home.
User avatar
Itchy
 
Posts: 173
Joined: Fri Jun 10, 2005 6:56 pm

Postby jazzman » Sat May 05, 2007 12:43 pm

I'm particularly impress with the success of the shop. Four to five thousand baht profit may not seem a lot to a farang but it's what a factory worker gets in Bangkok.

It was in my original plan to do the same, but in a dedicated building near the roadside (our house is set back about 40 metres from the road). I have been worried about the existing competition however. There are already four traditional houses that sell stuff on the roadside and I'm wondering if there is really any potentical for a newcomer with something more akin to a 7/11 minimart.

The nearest 7/11 is 38 km away and the nearest propper shopping is in Udon Thani 80 km away.
How to build a $20,000 / £14,000 house and a $???? MOTEL Updated 21 March 09 - with BOQ and costs
Don't let this happen in YOUR house.
jazzman
 
Posts: 2161
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:11 pm
Location: Thailand

Postby JASONTHAI » Sun May 06, 2007 12:54 am

jazzman wrote:I'm particularly impress with the success of the shop. Four to five thousand baht profit may not seem a lot to a farang but it's what a factory worker gets in Bangkok.

It was in my original plan to do the same, but in a dedicated building near the roadside (our house is set back about 40 metres from the road). I have been worried about the existing competition however. There are already four traditional houses that sell stuff on the roadside and I'm wondering if there is really any potentical for a newcomer with something more akin to a 7/11 minimart.

The nearest 7/11 is 38 km away and the nearest propper shopping is in Udon Thani 80 km away.


Hi Jazzman I had to pay for the land (140,000 baht) for land just off the main road on a side street in the village I could have got land for free from mama but it would be to far away to open a shop and make any profit, I am the only shop which looks like anything like a 7/11 mini mart the rest (5) of which 1 have just closed down I wonder why? are just woodern huts built outside there houses with out of date stock, I have a nice shop just like 7/11 but without the a/c I have already got a ice cream fridge last week which is doing o.k the next sept is getting mobile phone cards to sell as no one sell them in the village, it will take time like most businesses but if you can stop the villagers going to the town centre to get what they what then you will have a good chance of making a good profit, it will take time & will need a lot of marketing which the Thai's don't understand, My target is 200 baht a day profit which works out to roughly 1000 baht a day, it will take a while but I will keep trying, anyway here our some more photo's
Attachments
Picture 101.jpg
The front of the house & shop
Picture 100.jpg
The front of the house
Picture 097.jpg
The front of the shop
Picture 096.jpg
The boss( my son) guarding the shop again
Picture 095.jpg
The big boss of the shop
Where's my Chang beer
JASONTHAI
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2006 6:15 am
Location: CROYDON, ENGLAND

Postby jazzman » Sun May 06, 2007 12:07 pm

Cool pics :D
We built on land that was given to us by the in-laws. It is the first house as one enters the village and is right opposite the only filling (petrol) station for miles. The other village 'stores' are exactly as you describe but they are owned by very closed friends of the family and I would hate to put them out of business. Nevertheless, our product rage would hardly be competing with theirs, and it would be an opportunity for other farangs (there are quite a few spread round the remote villages in a 15 km radius) to buy milk, bread, cheese, bacon, bangers and the rest of the stuff that you can only get in a 7/11. Our amphur town is about 10 km away and apart from the inevitable glut of hardware stores and a small market has nothing else to offer. Most of the people here are self-sustaining with pork, chicken and vegetables, and their diet is extremely basic. They also consume huge quantities of insects.
Your comments are most encouraging :P
How to build a $20,000 / £14,000 house and a $???? MOTEL Updated 21 March 09 - with BOQ and costs
Don't let this happen in YOUR house.
jazzman
 
Posts: 2161
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:11 pm
Location: Thailand

Postby JASONTHAI » Fri Jul 13, 2007 9:51 pm

Here's a breakdown of the cost for the house and land

LAND (brought in 2006 was 140,000 baht which was about £2000 land size is 300sq metres and is not on a rice field in the middle of nowhere but on a side road which has electric, water & a telephone box about 50 metres up the road)

BUILDERS COST (242,000 baht which is about £3500 this included all electric & plumbing work)

BUILDING STUFF (603,000 baht which is about £8800 this includes all the normal stuff like bricks, cerment, tiles and so on and also includes windows, kitchen cabinets & sink, toilet, basin & shower unit, taps & fans around the house)

SHOP ( 25,000 baht for a 2 door fridge, 7,000 baht for shelves for shop & 33,000 baht for stock for shop so this works out at about £950 the shop is 12.5 sq metres)

WALL AROUND THE HOUSE ( this is still on going but nearly finished so far the cost is 49,000 baht builders cost & 62,000 baht for pillers, bricks and so I still need a metal fence & gate for the front enterance and I have budgeted myself 40,000 baht for this so this should work out to about 151,000 baht about £2200)

GARDEN ( still needs to be done, Lawn, plants & trees I have a budget of 30,000 baht for this about £440 )

so overall you looking at about 1.23 million baht which is about £18,000, remember you will still have to buy beds, tv's and other bits but in the long run this is far cheaper than building in Pattaya you would be looking at about 2 million baht to do this due to land prices being high and builders cost !

BILLS ( electric bills are 1400 baht a month including shop cost, water is about 95 baht a month so about 1500 baht a month in total, as the shop makes about 3000 baht a month profit this still leaves my GF with 1500 baht a month which she buys food from the market to last her & the family a month)

OVERALL ( the cost to build per sq metre worked out to be just under 7,700 baht)
Where's my Chang beer
JASONTHAI
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2006 6:15 am
Location: CROYDON, ENGLAND

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