New village build near Udon

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Re: New village build near Udon

Postby ajarnudon » Sun May 14, 2017 11:48 pm

RETRO: You can see in the first pic in the May 11 post the rebar for the second stage of the footing. This was poured soon after and I was in a hurry to cover it and wet the fill to stop moisture loss from the freshly poured concrete in the 35 deg+ heat. Consequently I missed getting pics showing the horizontal section of the L shaped footing - something that I know is of interest to Sometimes Woodworker.
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Re: New village build near Udon

Postby pipoz » Mon May 15, 2017 10:27 am

Hi are you going to render your columns or just leave them as with the "Off Form" finished concrete look

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Re: New village build near Udon

Postby ajarnudon » Mon May 15, 2017 5:24 pm

pipoz wrote:Hi are you going to render your columns or just leave them as with the "Off Form" finished concrete look

pipoz

I will end up rendering them as there is some exposed aggregate at a couple of corners. Purely cosmetic.
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Re: New village build near Udon

Postby ajarnudon » Thu May 18, 2017 10:08 pm

Have had the formwork in place for the rest of the columns for a week. Six inches of rain last Saturday morning, and it's rained every day since. Silver lining is the moisture retention in the concrete we have already poured, enhancing the curing process.
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Re: New village build near Udon

Postby Roger Ramjet » Thu May 18, 2017 10:46 pm

ajarnudon wrote:Have had the formwork in place for the rest of the columns for a week. Six inches of rain last Saturday morning, and it's rained every day since. Silver lining is the moisture retention in the concrete we have already poured, enhancing the curing process.

I bought old sacks and cut them so they wrapped around the columns and had one of the workers wet them down three or four times a day. The slower the cure, the stronger the final result. By the end of a month they should be at maximum strength (for a month's slow cure) and it gives great peace of mind later, especially when you read about all the tremors that are occurring.
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