Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Any story related to building in the LOS, whether everything turned out hunky dory or not!

Moderators: MGV12, BKKBILL, fredlk

Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Postby oneday » Thu Oct 16, 2014 5:16 pm

My wife asked me not to post the building story of our house, but I have gotten so much valuable information out of this forum, I feel the need to give back. I also see a need to tighten up my knowledge in various areas as the construction proceeds so I can post my questions here and get quicker answers from a wider audience. So this is my story.

LAND
The land was bought over a year ago. A little house that my wife’s father built sits on this land in the front left-hand corner with a pathetic and questionable water supply and it had the next lower electric meter from what we now have which is the 15/45 meter. Many of the people in the area are descendants of my wife’s great grandfather and just about all the land in this area is owned by those descendants. The people across the road owned this land we bought.

My wife spent a lot of her childhood years growing up in this little house where she is now staying while she supervises the construction with tons of input from me at home in Pattaya and at the same time she works for an Australian travel website online 8 hours a day. I have given her the go ahead to quit if it all becomes too much to handle, because the house is #1.

The land is 1.5 rai that we got for 50,000 baht. If fronts a dirt road 20 kilometers out from the nearest REAL city of Somdet in the province of Kalasin. Seven of those 20 kilometers is a dirt road. This will not be a house we will live in per se. It will be for when she or we are visiting and for anyone in her family that needs a place to stay. Primarily, it will be for her, in her old age and/or her father. My wife will no doubt survive me. Her parents are divorced and her mother is in Ayutthaya. Both have remarried and have homes at this time. After the house is built we will head to America for a long time…at least that is the plan.

DIRT INFILL
The land slopes down from right to left so we had dirt brought in. Later we built 3 sides of a perimeter wall, leaving the front open for trucks to enter, but we should have built the wall before the dirt infill. Some of our dirt washed away with the rains which I foresaw, but ignored. I knew I didn’t want clay like dirt so when I actually saw the dirt for the first time I was surprised to see it was a very sandy mix. After the wall was build we continued to have dirt brought in averaging 500 baht per truck and 80 baht to spread it. Some of the last dirt we got was rocky and clayish, but it will be fine. We will learn to deal with it. At least the soil will be good draining if the water can get through the thinner clay layer. We brought in over 100 trucks which only really filled up the back 1 rai of the lot.

PERIMETER WALL
So the wall was a 2 month project in May and June of this year. My wife liked the wall builder when she interviewed him, but he turned out to be, less than desirable. As a matter of fact, my wife ran him off and keep the general workers, some of which were good people, but not necessarily skilled at building walls. As a consequence we got a fairly sloppy build which was later cleaned up by a different crew after our original crew quit in a drunken argument with each other one night. They quit just before finishing the top cap. This was fortunate, as it turned out, because the plasterers were a very hard working and conscientious group of people. They used the plaster to clean up all the ugly and unlevel lines and did a phenomenal job. We plan to have them back to finish off the front wall.

WELL
So I wanted a water supply independent of the questionable and spotty village water service which comes from a disgusting pond. Our first attempt at a well was 4” and down to 24 or so meters. They just gave up and left with no charge.

The second attempt was also 4” and went down in a new hole to 35 meters and supposedly there was water. We paid the drillers and let them go without installing a pump because we were not going to be there much and didn’t want the pump stolen. When we did go to buy a pump my wife was advised to get a “jet pump” which may very well have worked if anyone could have gotten the pipes to go down past 14 meters. The drillers screwed something up down there. We paid for two attempts to install the pump and quit. Anyone need a good Hitachi Jet Pump; cost 7500 new. That second attempt wasted about 18,000 baht. Anyway we were finally able to get a proper 6” drilling rig from a local university. At one point around 40-45 meters they were going to quit and not charge us and leave, but I thought we had gone this far and there did seem to be some water so we had them go as far as all the drill bits they had would take them and that was to 62 meters. Having them stay, committed us to the rental for the machine at 50,000, but somehow we paid less.

A little later we bought a Franklin submersible pump for 12,000 baht and had it installed and we found we did indeed have water, though it is not a steady aquifer type of supply. The pump is sitting around 54 meters and over a 12 hour period we can get a good flow through a 1 ¼ inch pipe for about 5 minutes. This, of course, is not ideal, but it is really good looking water and much more preferable to the village supply. We will have the water tested when time permits.

This house will not have heavy use so we will just have to turn the pump on, once or twice a day, until the well empties. Total cost of the rig, diesel gas and labor was 47,000 and change. It turns out there appears to be several layers of hard rock beneath our land and I’m assuming water seeps in at two or three different levels where the dirt is more porous and they encountered water. This crew earned their money for the gas used on the generator and the difficulty of drilling through layers of rock.

We ended up buying 1-2000 liter storage tank for general use and 1-1000 special tank for drinking water that will eventually be run through a house filter system. I had been planning on plumbing the city water into the 2000 liter tank, but my wife absolutely wants nothing to do with the city water so that was that. All our water will come from the well. I guess we will find out how good the supply is later this winter going into summer.

HOUSE DESIGN
My wife contacted an architect, a friend of a friend, for our house design. We vacillated back and forth on a two or three bedroom house and some other items. What was supposed to cost 15,000 was suddenly raised another 5,000 with no warning making the total cost 20,000 due to us not being clear in our own minds what we wanted. The 20,000 got us a two bedroom design, but later we went back to a 3 bedroom and so we had the design altered for another 3,000.

The village our house is in just became a Tesabaan so my wife had to submit the drawings to the local Tesabaan and that cost 339 baht based on square meters of home. Why Thailand likes to add porches and back landings into the square meter calculation I do not know, but it bugs the hell out of me. Our house is 123 square meters under the roof (living area) with a 26 square meter front porch and 3 or 4 square meters off the kitchen where there are stairs leading down to the sidewalk around the house.

Our house will be built up more or less 1 meter off the ground. We do not have a flooding problem here, but it looked good and I liked the idea of having the floor off the ground about 1 meter. There will also be a standard 1 meter wide sidewalk around the house.

THE BID – THE BUILDER
We had bids ranging from 11,000 a square meter or about 1.65M. Ultimately, this guy just seemed to have too much work going on and he stuck his own foot in his mouth when he told my wife one of his customers was complaining about him finishing. The highest bid or estimate was from “Bob the Builder” at 3.5M with no kitchen…I laughed at the email and moved on.

We finally settled on the only guy who seemed very professional and got lots of good comments from building suppliers in town. This is how I had my wife look for a builder by asking all the suppliers she came in contact with. This guy’s name kept coming up. His bid is more than I would like, but there was no other good choice. His bid was 1.75M, but when I added a double Q-Con outer wall he increased the price 100,000. When my wife asked for a double layer roof he added another 50,000. In each case I know he is making a 100% profit after material and labor. That at the last minute he finagled another 30,000 baht for the rocks facade on the face of the house. That irritated me, but it is what it is.

Many builders have a list of items for a house such as tile where they will tell you how much of the cost they will cover and this guy had a comprehensive list though he was still missing some items such as down lights and a couple other items. Most of the allowances I felt were pretty good and some even impressive such as the general house tile at 700 baht/sq meter. I thought the allowance on the bathroom sinks was low at 1000 baht, but mostly his allowances were well above anyone else's.

PREPARATION
I kept telling my wife step-by-step. I wanted the dirt, wall, electric and well all finished before any builder showed up on site and it worked out nicely.

THE PLAN
My wife will handle all the interfacing with the builder; I can’t be trusted. She got a good education on concrete and rebar with the perimeter wall so she is well educated in what to look for at the beginning of this build. I plan to come up when we get to some critical items, mostly when the walls start going up so I can check the window size and placement and electrical placement and some of the plumbing layout…just to make sure.

She knows to look for excessive water in the concrete (we got snookered on that with the first CPAC truck on the wall build). The @#$# builder told them at the factor to add water. I didn’t count on that happening. Boy, I wanted to knock him upside the head after hearing that...and thus why I should not be there. She knows the rebar cannot be excessively rusty and must have clearance from around dirt and forms so no rebar sticks out of the pour. She knows to look for the concrete being vibrated and kept wet for up to a week.

Here is the look we are going for.

Artist Concept.JPG


The Floorplan

Floorplan.JPG


Two people showed up two days ago to start digging the footers. Today 7 workers showed up. I believe work will start in earnest with rebar fabricators on the 23rd and I believe that is the ceremony day (good luck day).

I will not be posting everyday and I will try to gloss over details that everyone is familiar with, but who knows. I am a bit long-winded.
oneday
 
Posts: 133
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 5:21 pm

Re: Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Postby oneday » Thu Oct 16, 2014 6:09 pm

One thing I forgot to mention was this builder, believe it or not, DID NOT ask for money up front. For me this was a surprising sign and gives me hope for this build. He wants 5 equal payments and naturally the final payment is only after we are finished and satisfied.

The day the first two workers showed up I was quite pleased with the holes they had dug. Then my wife showed me a picture of a “jig” they had brought with them to get the size of all the holes perfect each and every time. This was a very welcome surprise to see this “jig”...another reason to hope.

One of the first footer holes.
The footer with a size gauge inside.jpg


The jig
The Jig.jpg
oneday
 
Posts: 133
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 5:21 pm

Re: Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Postby claynlr » Thu Oct 16, 2014 8:09 pm

Very good looking home Oneday...good luck with the build!
claynlr
 
Posts: 98
Joined: Wed Jan 29, 2014 1:46 pm

Re: Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Postby jomoblues » Fri Oct 17, 2014 8:11 am

Hi Oneday. Congratulations on making a start. Looks like that 'oneday' has arrived? Looking forward to reading how your build progresses.

I hope things go well for you. R/ John
User avatar
jomoblues
 
Posts: 636
Joined: Sun Nov 27, 2011 11:45 am
Location: Udon Thani

Re: Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Postby MGV12 » Fri Oct 17, 2014 8:55 am

oneday wrote:I am a bit long-winded.


"If a picture paints a thousand words" .... you could get away with say 10 pictures :lol:

Seriously ... good to have the details of your venture to date ... best of luck with the rest.

Builder does sound promising ... but never lose focus as the best of them can turn feral if other demands on their life take precedence :)

“Some days I am an optimistic pessimist ... other days I am a pessimistic optimist”
User avatar
MGV12
 
Posts: 5350
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 4:23 pm
Location: Chiang Mai

Re: Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Postby oneday » Fri Oct 17, 2014 9:33 am

claynlr wrote:Very good looking home Oneday...good luck with the build!


Thanks very much. I hope it comes close to that look on the front. However, there are no plans for that higher part of the roof on the left of the concept art and as I mentioned it will have a two-level roof. Not sure if some people know what I mean by that.

jomoblues wrote:Hi Oneday. Congratulations on making a start. Looks like that 'oneday' has arrived? Looking forward to reading how your build progresses. I hope things go well for you. R/ John


Hey John, I was hoping you might catch my thread. You’ve given many of us such a great thread to read I only hope mine will be up to par. Mostly, though, sorry to say, I sure hope I don’t have as much heartache and headache as you’ve had.

Just absolutely nothing seems to be going right with your build. Now your curtains are screwed up, though you have come through it all with a wonderful home. Well, at least the vendor has to pay for that mistake. You just have to pay in “extra time waiting for your privacy”.

Actually I decided on the ID “oneday” 7 years ago before ever coming to Thailand. It meant that one day I would come to Thailand. Little did I know I’d end up living here 5+ years.

MGV12 wrote:"If a picture paints a thousand words" .... you could get away with say 10 pictures :lol:

Seriously ... good to have the details of your venture to date ... best of luck with the rest.

Builder does sound promising ... but never lose focus as the best of them can turn feral if other demands on their life take precedence :)


555

Yeah, hopefully I can be a bit briefer on many of my post. There was a lot to tell about the past year or so and I felt compelled to set the stage for the project.

From reading this forum, just about all builds go pretty well, within reason, up to when the walls start to go up. However, it seems that when paint, tiles, installation of plumbing fixtures and those final finishes start, things often start to fall apart.

My wife is off tomorrow for Kalasin and/or Khon Kaen to get a kitchen designed or to get as close as she can to final choices on tile or both. We made about 3 separate trips to Home-Mart here in Pattaya to pick out and agree on our tile choices. They have a Home-Mart in Kalasin so hopefully that was time well spent. Thank goodness we both have similar tastes, but in the end this is her house and the final choices are all hers to make.

The kitchen will be a standard Thai concrete enclosure with Kitzcho cabinets installed. The cost of our build even includes an allowance of 1900 baht/sq meter for granite in the kitchen and bathroom. That was also a very pleasant surprise.

I’m told the footers are almost all dug. And the all important decision on where to place the worker’s potty has been made.
oneday
 
Posts: 133
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 5:21 pm

Re: Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Postby oneday » Fri Oct 17, 2014 10:09 am

Here is the plot and placement of the house. It will line up on the right-hand wall and be 5 meters from the right-hand wall. The nearest it will be to the back wall is 5.5 meters. That gap in the back of the house is now a 3rd bedroom so the house is FLAT across the back.
Plot2.JPG


Satellite photo. It was a nice surprise to see a new photo had been taken of this area since we put the dirt on. It makes the plot very easy to see.
Satelite.JPG


Here is a double or two level roof. The tile on our roof will be a dark brown as in the concept art. Though it is not an “Excella” tile at 80 bath+ per tile, it looks like “Excella” at approximately half the cost. It is called Neutile I believe. Yeah, I know…dark brown…heat…I know…design over function.
Roof 2-level.JPG
oneday
 
Posts: 133
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 5:21 pm

Re: Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Postby oneday » Fri Oct 17, 2014 12:05 pm

I thought I would accompany this thread with a little thread on the building of our perimeter wall detailing some of the things we learned and some of the problems we encountered.

It can be found in the "Perimeter Wall" section. I have started it and it should be finished today.

viewtopic.php?f=12&t=4760
oneday
 
Posts: 133
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 5:21 pm

Re: Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Fri Oct 17, 2014 2:19 pm

oneday wrote:My wife is off tomorrow for Kalasin and/or Khon Kaen to get a kitchen designed or to get as close as she can to final choices on tile or both. We made about 3 separate trips to Home-Mart here in Pattaya to pick out and agree on our tile choices. They have a Home-Mart in Kalasin so hopefully that was time well spent. Thank goodness we both have similar tastes, but in the end this is her house and the final choices are all hers to make.

The kitchen will be a standard Thai concrete enclosure with Kitzcho cabinets installed. The cost of our build even includes an allowance of 1900 baht/sq meter for granite in the kitchen and bathroom. That was also a very pleasant surprise.

Don't forget that a really comfortable kitchen to work in has toe kicks in the cabinets. This can be done with a concrete tiled kitchen if you want (and insist :D ) It isn't difficult to do but does take a little more time.

To my eye all the kitchens people show don't look right without the toe kick, however nice the the tiles and fittings.
Sometimewoodworker
 
Posts: 1849
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 1:22 pm
Location: Non Sa-At / Tokyo

Re: Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Postby pipoz » Fri Oct 17, 2014 2:47 pm

oneday wrote:Here is the plot and placement of the house. It will line up on the right-hand wall and be 5 meters from the right-hand wall. The nearest it will be to the back wall is 5.5 meters. That gap in the back of the house is now a 3rd bedroom so the house is FLAT across the back.
Plot2.JPG


Satellite photo. It was a nice surprise to see a new photo had been taken of this area since we put the dirt on. It makes the plot very easy to see.
Satelite.JPG


Here is a double or two level roof. The tile on our roof will be a dark brown as in the concept art. Though it is not an “Excella” tile at 80 bath+ per tile, it looks like “Excella” at approximately half the cost. It is called Neutile I believe. Yeah, I know…dark brown…heat…I know…design over function.
Roof 2-level.JPG


Congratulations and excellent choice in choosing the Neustile (CPAC) type roof tile. I used it in my build (Udon Thani Happy House) and have posted details and costs there if you are interested. my colour is dark grey and I am not worried about the heat, so stick with your dark brown colour if that is your preferred choice. At the end you and your partner, want to be happy with the look of your house, without any regrets. Heat in roof space, if it builds up, can be dealt with relatively easily.

pipoz
User avatar
pipoz
 
Posts: 1912
Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2012 10:41 pm
Location: Udon Thani Sometimes

Re: Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Postby oneday » Fri Oct 17, 2014 3:39 pm

Sometimewoodworker wrote:Don't forget that a really comfortable kitchen to work in has toe kicks in the cabinets. This can be done with a concrete tiled kitchen if you want (and insist :D ) It isn't difficult to do but does take a little more time.

To my eye all the kitchens people show don't look right without the toe kick, however nice the the tiles and fittings.


Nope, I didn’t forget. I can live without the toe-kick as I do now in our kitchen here in Pattaya, but I did lay out the spec for a toe-kick in my paperwork I gave to my wife. However, she won’t need that to get the kitchen design at a home store. My only concern now is laying it out with all the doors, drawers and wall cabinets we will need, in the space we have, to make sure it all fits nicely so we can give it to the builder…assuming he won’t charge extra for the installation. I could install the base fixtures myself, but I’d want to hire someone for the wall cabinets if our builder won’t do it as part of the project.

I just need to get the information on the toe-kick to the builder before he starts building the concrete enclosure. I was fairly certain there was no reason it couldn’t be built into a concrete enclosure and now you have confirmed this so thanks a heap for that.

pipoz wrote:Congratulations and excellent choice in choosing the Neustile (CPAC) type roof tile. I used it in my build (Udon Thani Happy House) and have posted details and costs there if you are interested. my colour is dark grey and I am not worried about the heat, so stick with your dark brown colour if that is your preferred choice. At the end you and your partner, want to be happy with the look of your house, without any regrets. Heat in roof space, if it builds up, can be dealt with relatively easily.
pipoz


You can’t believe how hard I tried to get it across to my wife how important it was to have the air in the roof vented at as high a level as possible. I’ve heard twice now that builders point to the holes in the soffits and say, “that is where the air goes out” and I just laugh and shake my head. I can see air flowing in one side and pushing some of the hot air out the other side through the soffits, but not nearly enough IMO.

So I told my wife if it is too bad we can always have one of those aluminum whirlybirds put on the backside of the roof low enough to be out of sight from the road. That just does great harm to her aesthetic sense…mine also really. As you say, there are retrofits if it becomes a real problem.
oneday
 
Posts: 133
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 5:21 pm

Re: Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Postby pipoz » Fri Oct 17, 2014 4:44 pm

Congratulations and excellent choice in choosing the Neustile (CPAC) type roof tile. I used it in my build (Udon Thani Happy House) and have posted details and costs there if you are interested. my colour is dark grey and I am not worried about the heat, so stick with your dark brown colour if that is your preferred choice. At the end you and your partner, want to be happy with the look of your house, without any regrets. Heat in roof space, if it builds up, can be dealt with relatively easily.
pipoz[/quote]

You can’t believe how hard I tried to get it across to my wife how important it was to have the air in the roof vented at as high a level as possible. I’ve heard twice now that builders point to the holes in the soffits and say, “that is where the air goes out” and I just laugh and shake my head. I can see air flowing in one side and pushing some of the hot air out the other side through the soffits, but not nearly enough IMO. So I told my wife if it is too bad we can always have one of those aluminum whirlybirds put on the backside of the roof low enough to be out of sight from the road. That just does great harm to her aesthetic sense…mine also really. As you say, there are retrofits if it becomes a real problem.[/quote]


Hi Oneday, some of the CPAC Neustile roof tile profiles have a special purpose made roof tile for the Vent, like that in the attached picture. Just check at HOMEMART if your selected roof tile profile has a matching vent tile. Not sure what Tile Profile you have selected,

I got my roof Neustile tiles (Trend - Black Steel colour, actually a dark grey) from HOMEMART as they seem to market the SCG-CPAC tile range the best, plus they answered my emails. SGC had the best web information on the CPAC roof tiles

I have a Neustile Brochure and other information (quotes from HOMEMART and a cost spreadsheet) that I can send to you, but the file size of the Brochure is too big. I will try to reduce the file sizes tomorrow. Have posted some under my Build

pipoz
Attachments
Picture 6 - CPAC Roof Vents and Special Roof Tile.jpg
CPAC Special Roof Tile Vent
User avatar
pipoz
 
Posts: 1912
Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2012 10:41 pm
Location: Udon Thani Sometimes

Re: Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Postby oneday » Fri Oct 17, 2014 4:57 pm

My wife and I looked at our roofing options at Home Mart here in Pattaya and that's where we spotted the Neustile. The last we talked the profile she wanted was FLAT glossy. She had the brochures and had all the discussions with the builder. Her and I haven't talked about this for some time now.

I have no doubt they should be able to make a ridge venting system for any type of tile, if they wanted.

I'll have to get with her to find out the exact model tile she is having the builder order and go to Home Mart to see if they have a ridge vent system for it, get all the information and pass it on to her.
oneday
 
Posts: 133
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 5:21 pm

Re: Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Postby oneday » Sat Oct 18, 2014 2:03 pm

Anybody use a product I just saw at Home Mart called "Crocodile Shield"?

It comes in a 20K bag like cement. You mix with water and paint it on with a brush or roller. It coats 13 sq meters with two coats; one horizontal coat and one vertical coat. It feels a little like a thin coat of plaster. You are supposed to put it on the plaster in a shower or any area you want to waterproof before you put the tiles on. It has a rough texture so the tile mortar should have no problems adhering. They have a demo paper box coated with this stuff and filled with water at the display. Looks good.

2200+ baht for one bag.
oneday
 
Posts: 133
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 5:21 pm

Re: Our Build in Kalasin, Somdet

Postby pipoz » Sat Oct 18, 2014 2:37 pm

oneday wrote:Anybody use a product I just saw at Home Mart called "Crocodile Shield"?

It comes in a 20K bag like cement. You mix with water and paint it on with a brush or roller. It coats 13 sq meters with two coats; one horizontal coat and one vertical coat. It feels a little like a thin coat of plaster. You are supposed to put it on the plaster in a shower or any area you want to waterproof before you put the tiles on. It has a rough texture so the tile mortar should have no problems adhering. They have a demo paper box coated with this stuff and filled with water at the display. Looks good.

2200+ baht for one bag.


Yes I briefly used a type of Crocodile product, briefly, but not as you have suggested.

I bought a plastic tub of it (about 2 liters), not a bag. It was a grey powder that you added water to, to make a concrete type slurry. My intentions was to brush it on under the first course of block work to act as a waterproof barrier to stop any rising damp. I tried a small section and it took a 12 hours to partly dry out, ending up in a thin grey rubbery type layer, sitting on top of the concrete slab. I wasn't overly impressed and not sure it it would do the job for me, so I went and found myself a proper Damp Proof Membrane .

I didn't contemplate using it as a brush on application in the shower wall plaster/render behind the tiles. In my shower wall render/plaster, I will look to add a additive into the render mix and then use a non shrink grout, when grouting the tiles.

pipoz
User avatar
pipoz
 
Posts: 1912
Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2012 10:41 pm
Location: Udon Thani Sometimes

Next

Return to Your Building Story

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 1 guest