Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Any story related to building in the LOS, whether everything turned out hunky dory or not!

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Re: Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Mon Nov 24, 2014 10:09 am

Thaipom26 wrote:
Is it only necessary to have one P-trap in the grey water pipe or should I fit one to each of the three floor wastes even though they are all on the same line?

Many thanks in advance.


All floor wastes, sinks and wash basins should have their own p-trap.
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Re: Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Mon Nov 24, 2014 2:18 pm

Thaipom26 wrote:
Is it only necessary to have one P-trap in the grey water pipe or should I fit one to each of the three floor wastes even though they are all on the same line?

Many thanks in advance.

Also the pipe needs to be vented after the p-trap to avoid siphon clearing of the p-trap. The vents usually exit at the roof line.
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Re: Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Postby Thaipom26 » Sun Nov 30, 2014 7:38 pm

Week 4 November 22 - 28

I thought this week was going to be a shorter post but having just finished writing it not so. The main stories are sort of supplementary to the build while the actual construction almost takes second place. I think that even the most talented of writers, which I’m not claiming to be, would struggle to develop an enthralling story around concrete formwork being made and then concrete poured so I won’t even try.

Having said that the week was actually a great one from my point of view because what we ended up with was the entire house design outlined in concrete so for the first time we could see each room, its size and relationship to other rooms and the garden.

Day 22 Saturday, I left you in Week 3 with the rebar that forms the basis for the beam footings completed and the timber formwork starting to be constructed around the rebar frame. This continued today.

DSC_0547.JPG
New formwork being built around the Week 3 rebar. This is the ensuite end of the house at the back.

The final result was a mish mash of timber planking with the whole thing held together by a collection of pieces of wood nailed across or driven into the ground. Technical is wasn't but did the job.

Day 23 Sunday, The first pour of concrete into the rear of the house, which contains the ensuites and my small computer room. Concrete was mixed on-site and two barrows delivered it to where it was needed. A slow process that resulted in the footings being poured over a number of days. We also had an electricity outage so work had to pack up early for the day.

DSC_0700.JPG
Delivery of concrete, which is then bucketed across to formwork inside the outer walls.

I came across my first major challenge with the build today. In getting the formwork ready for the concrete pour Ming was adding some extra reinforcing steel to what will be our bedroom sliding door and asked me via Gaun if that was OK for the step down. Now this was news to me as in my mind and what I thought I had asked the draftsman to draw was the slab extending from inside to outside inclusive of everything under the roofline all at the same level. No step down involved!

An examination of the plans showed that in the some of the drawings what I wanted was shown while in the more technical ones that the builder was quite correctly using the slab was in two parts. Based on these drawings the internal concrete for the slab would be poured 10 cm thick on top of the current 40 cm high beam footings giving a 50 cm variation from the inside floor to natural ground level. A 10 cm slab would then be poured for all the external areas under the roofline but at ground level. That meant there was a 40 cm drop from inside to outside and the concept I wanted to achieve of a clean flow between the inside and outside living areas would not be happening. This 40 cm drop was why Ming was enquiring about where I wanted the steps to be – thank goodness for the heads up.

Picture-42.jpg
A natural flow between inside and outside areas like this, although my outdoor living areas will all be under the roofline.

This was not Ming’s fault. I should have understood that how the footings were being constructed weren’t in a way that supported the vision I had. I should also have picked up on the variation in the plans. It isn’t entirely the draftsman’s fault because he was applying a Thai solution to what I was telling him through Gaun that I wanted. A Thai house tends to end with the walls dropping to the dirt, which is never covered with concrete, and there is no incorporation of outside living areas in the way we would think of doing in the West.

The benefit of having a good relationship with one’s builder came to play here because we worked through the various options to come up with a way to achieve what I thought I was originally getting. The end result is that we are adding 40 cm of new soil to the entire half of the land where the house currently sits, sloping down to the current level towards the front. The effect is to bury the concrete beam footings so they sit almost at ground level rather than being 40 cm above ground level. Once the new soil is compacted the 10 cm concrete slab can be extended from inside to include the total area under roofline in the one pour all at the same level.

For those worried about the flooding risks to this strategy the land on which my house will sit will be the highest in the village! My Thai family have come to the rescue and organised someone to provide the trucks and tractor to move the soil and will provide it free from their farm.

Day 24 Monday, I had to order another 50 bags of cement to complete this stage of the build. Same price at 125 THB a bag but saved 100 THB on delivery this time – bonus! Delivered within the hour.

Good progress made today. The team seemed to be keen to get on with the job. I was told they are getting paid 160 THB a meter, which is an interesting way of doing it. The last of the completed formwork at the rear bedroom end of the house filled with concrete by the end of the day.

DSC_0744.JPG
End of day 24. More formwork being taken off.

Ming is keeping the water up to the competed concrete including the plastic wrapped column.

Day 25 Tuesday, today the remaining formwork was completed for the front section of the house. More electricity problems so no concrete poured.

DSC_0754.JPG
Everything ready for a big day tomorrow – electricity willing. This is towards the front of the house.

We left the builders to it and drove to Udon Thani, about an hour away to visit Global House in search of the elusive P-Trap, a shy little critter as we couldn't spot any sign of one in Nong Bua Lamphu. A complete mystery to Thai Watsadu. It ended up being a complete mystery to Global House too who I guess is mainly catering to Thais and P-Traps obviously aren't a design inclusion to many houses here. This accounts for the terrible odors one occasionally comes across in accommodation here. Thais still have some catching up to do in certain areas.

At a loss of where to next I just happened to stop at a small hardware chain outlet almost directly opposite Global on the ringroad in Udon, the name of which I wanted to share but unfortunately the receipt is all in Thai and I have forgotten. Next time I go to Global I will update this post. Showing the guy a photo of what I wanted he immediately took me to a bin full of them. I felt like Christmas had come early. 2″ at 200 THB each.

We also called into a place called EK Decorate & Design to enquire about double glazing. Since Week 3 I have received another quote from a Southern based company called DeKu, website on my blog, who also produce German designed double glazed windows/sliding doors. I have read previously about people having problems sourcing double glazing. I've had no problems finding places and getting quotes. DeKu’s quote came in slightly cheaper than the other two I wrote about previously and also included installation, something the other two couldn't offer. It is a separate cost but I would prefer the people who build the windows to install them rather than rely on the local “talent”.

Our visit to EK was to try and get a final quote from a quality local supplier who can also fit, so I can make a decision and order. EK are agents for Windsor windows and the display products were impressively solid and well made. I have asked them to quote for the full house, both double and non-double glazed. I suspect the result will be more expensive than the 170,000 THB I currently have budgeted for all windows and sliding doors but it’s worth a try.

You can read about EK Decorate & Design on my blog. The main guy there speak NO English so getting the detail across is a bit of a challenge even with Gaun, my wife, with me. Hopefully I can report back on the final outcome on windows next week.

Our final task for the day was to order 150 m2 of tiling for inside the house. Although tiles will be the very last thing to happen, and this has been agreed with the builder, we liked the design and I am sure that if I came back when they were needed on-site they would be sold out. Just under 40,000 THB or around A$9.20 per m2, which is pretty good considering they are an Australian tile! Doing my bit for Australia's trade balance.

Day 26 Wednesday, the team was all go and the remaining formwork filled with concrete. A team of 5 – 3 blokes doing the heavy stuff and 2 women putting in a big effort. Ming is always on site supervising. Nothing much new to show you in photos, just formwork filled with concrete, so I won't bother :D

Day 27 Thursday, the team showed up to remove the formwork and then took off to cut sugar! It’s a Thai thing – what can you do? Ming was worried that I would be angry. It’s a shame that’s the first thought he had of dealing with a farang in this situation, presumably based on previous experience. It wasn’t his fault so why would I be angry? Ming was working the phones to get workers back on site ASAP so that’s the best outcome I could expect.

A large truck showed up in the morning with our 152 boxes of tiles on board. They had driven from just outside Bangkok the previous day arriving our area at midnight. Ours was their only delivery and this must be an eight hour trip each way so how the economics of that works out I’m not sure. Delivery was included in the price we paid for the tiles.

DSC_0871.JPG
The house at the end of Day 27.

From the back left to right – Ensuite 1, Peng’s little homework desk area, my blog room and finally ensuite 2. The next section back – the two bedrooms with built in wardrobes. The next section from left to right – the outside under-roof dining area enclosed on three sides, the inside dining/family area and a U-shaped kitchen far right. Where Gaun is standing – on the left the entry and lounge and on the right an outside under-roof sitting area. You can compare it with the design below. I have since made a couple of minor changes but it is pretty close.

House-design-final.jpg

Day 28 Friday, Ming is our only worker and he plus my brother-in-law Lud were busy cleaning up the site and moving the storage shed ready for the next stage and the delivery of soil.

Another satisfying week’s progress with lots achieved or in progress. I won’t spoil my post for next week but I could hear hammers at work on the site earlier this afternoon!

This is a pretty close copy of the version on my blog here http://tonyinthailand.com/building-isaan-week-4/ so there's no need to go to the blog other than the fact I have included more photos there plus you'll find my ongoing spreadsheet of costs too if interested.
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Re: Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Postby Thaipom26 » Sat Dec 06, 2014 9:00 pm

Week 5 November 29 - December 5

This was the week our house disappeared but more about that later.

Day 29 Saturday, Last week finished up slowly as the five person crew working up to that point disappeared to cut sugar as I reported in Week 4. However Ming, the builder, continued to turn up on-site at 7.00 am each day and today the formwork for the 12 remaining columns started to take shape. Ming hasn't had a day off since we started and has shown a real dedication to the build. Money well spent so far.

Day 30 Sunday, Ming has been calling in favours and now has a permanent worker on the job. Ming's son has also been pulled in from Bangkok and will be working from tomorrow. Formwork is still the priority and quicker progress was made today obviously with double the workforce. By the end of the day, five of the columns had their boxes constructed with one more to go. Ming is doing the concrete pour for the columns in two sessions.

DSC_0128.JPG
Working on the final one for the day. Four completed.

Day 31 Monday, I wrote about the need to bury the house footprint in last week's post. Today everything we have achieved so far was going underground as three trucks were turning up to transport earth from the family farm to the land. It was the same crew that originally trucked in nearly 200 loads to raise the land above any flood levels back in November last year and that story can be found here http://tonyinthailand.com/buying-land-in-isaan/.

Ming's son had turned up with a small truck of his own which will prove useful as the build progresses. Leaving the son and Gaun's family to look after the soil work at the land Ming, Gaun and I headed back to Bluescope on the other side of Khon Kaen to order Colorbond for the roof. Gaun and I had already visited the factory, and I wrote about it in Week 3, but I wanted to ensure that the colour I had chosen was held for me and I needed Ming to do his Thai builder thing with Boom, the sales manager lady, to ensure we reserved the correct quantity.

Ming had already worked out the lengths he needed but there was additional discussion about the number of screws, the flashing and some other technical aspect and I was pleased to leave them to it. We ended up ordering 304 m2 to cover the 260 m2 roof and this plus the flashing and screws brought the price in at a bit under 126,000 THB, 27,000 THB more than the rough estimate we came away with from the first meeting. We paid a 1/3rd deposit of 37,000 THB.

Bluescope wanted to charge 5,000 THB to deliver, which Ming wouldn't be in. I believe his son's truck will be doing the job and, although I am sure I will pay, I am also sure it will be a lot less than the Bluescope fee.

I get slightly worried about spending what is for me a largish chunk of the total budget on things like Colorbond roofing. I could have got the stuff the Thais buy for a LOT less. I hope that making decisions like this aren't just for "comfort", in that it's what I would do back in Australia, but really does add practical value and quality to the house.

I have provided a copy of the invoice for those particularly interested in this aspect of the build.

IMG.jpg
Bluescope quote for Colorbond.

On our return to Si Bun Ruang burying the house was well underway.

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Small trucks. 200 THB each load including he tractor fee. This bloke is driving through my lounge room.

We ended up with 49 loads of soil for a cost of 9,800 THB.

Day 32 Tuesday, nothing too exciting to report for the rest of the week but we'll still continue with the day by day report format. Ming and the 2 workers were putting their energies into putting up the column formwork. They were very methodical and steady with the job. String and plum lines being used across the site so I have some confidence that everything will be in line and vertical at the end. Always the optimist.

DSC_0198.JPG
It looks all pretty slapdash but a lot of work went into this end result.

Day 33 Wednesday, an extra guy was pulled out of sugar harvesting, one of the original team, and the concrete poured for these six columns.

After the pour the first of the plumbing trenches was dug at the back of the house, mainly to fill in some time I think, as Ming wants to build the roof next before putting in the concrete slab so plumbing preparation isn't a necessity yet.

Day 34 Thursday, the formwork was removed from the six columns so it could be used for the remaining six. The columns were wrapped in plastic and watered. Three of the remaining columns had their formwork finished by the end of the day.

DSC_0264.JPG
The result late afternoon. Working on the new outer columns.

Day 35 Friday, the formwork was completed and concrete poured for all the 13 columns by end of day. It was a relief to see something coming out of the ground instead of burying it!

DSC_0275.JPG
Almost there

I am still pleased with progress. I was thinking about the difference between building here and Australia when writing this post. Back "home" when action happens it often involves more equipment and progress is quicker than here. However my experience of building in Australia is that this all happens in bursts. One of the trades finishes and then you hang around waiting for the next stage to get going. In my build here things take longer, for example where string and plum lines are used instead of lasers, but it's a seven day a week operation. The end result is that I doubt my house build here is going to take much longer than a similar project in Australia at the end of the day. Here's hoping.

You can find more photos, a little more detail and the current spreadsheet of costs at http://tonyinthailand.com/building-isaan-week-5/
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Re: Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Postby pipoz » Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:17 am

Progress looks good so far, another 20 - 30 days and you will just about have the roof on

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Re: Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Postby MGV12 » Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:44 am

Thaipom26 wrote:
Ming had already worked out the lengths he needed but there was additional discussion about the number of screws, the flashing and some other technical aspect and I was pleased to leave them to it. We ended up ordering 304 m2 to cover the 260 m2 roof and this plus the flashing and screws brought the price in at a bit under 126,000 THB, 27,000 THB more than the rough estimate we came away with from the first meeting. We paid a 1/3rd deposit of 37,000 THB.

Bluescope wanted to charge 5,000 THB to deliver, which Ming wouldn't be in. I believe his son's truck will be doing the job and, although I am sure I will pay, I am also sure it will be a lot less than the Bluescope fee.

I get slightly worried about spending what is for me a largish chunk of the total budget on things like Colorbond roofing. I could have got the stuff the Thais buy for a LOT less. I hope that making decisions like this aren't just for "comfort", in that it's what I would do back in Australia, but really does add practical value and quality to the house.


All looks to be progressing really well Tony ... hope it continues to the end of the build for you. Chok dee

Related comment: I have had direct feedback from Thai contractors/workers that they [mostly] fail to understand why anybody would want to pay so much more for Colorbond than other products readily available at a much lower cost; the better ones they say last almost as long. Such decisions [to them] suggest a farang who has more money than sense and consequently they up the next quote they give you ... by a long way if its for 'extras'. I know and appreciate the benefits of the Bluescope product but at that price I would expect free delivery and installation ... more chance of the guarantee holding if the supplier installs it themselves.

“Some days I am an optimistic pessimist ... other days I am a pessimistic optimist”
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Re: Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Postby Thaipom26 » Sun Dec 07, 2014 7:11 pm

Thanks to you both.

You could well be right MGV12. In a Thai sense some of our decisions must look pretty mysterious helping to cement the impression farangs having unlimited money to throw around. The Colorbond decision wasn't one I felt completely happy with and, as you say, delivery and installation would have been nice especially for the price. In an Australian sense spending A$4,500 on 300 m2 of Colorbond looks pretty modest but I guess that's a not a relevant justification but it did help! With such a large roof in comparison to the house I wanted it to look smart and the colours and the highly polished look of the Thai alternatives I have seen just don't do it for me.

I am trying to find that balance between quality and not just replicating what I would do at home but it is a challenge. For me I don't see the Colorbond example as an excuse for the house to cost more as a result of Thai contractors thinking I have money to burn. Maybe people like me have a general flow-on effect across the building for farang industry. I have a fixed price labour contract and am buying mainly from the same sources as everyone else - Global House etc. I am the greatest threat to costs as I build a house with what I regard as the basics - insulation, double AAC blocks, decent showers, vented plumbing, double glazing in the bedrooms to combat Isaan early mornings etc etc!!!
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Re: Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Postby Thaipom26 » Mon Dec 15, 2014 8:52 pm

Week 6 December 6 - 12

Week 6 was all about the roof and getting the beams that will support the roof structure in place and welded on the concrete columns.

For those of you following progress you might remember that because we couldn't start the build proper until after the house blessing ceremony on 16 November Ming the builder concentrated on constructing some of the roof structure at the family home, which is where the steel was being stored. The main components were the base beams, three of them at 18 mtrs running the full length of the house and two 11 meter beams running the width of the house.

roof.jpg
The base beams for the roof structure.

The challenge was now to transport these large beams to the land and get them on top of the columns, which stand more than 3 meters high. Now at over 6 kilos per meter, and we had two lengths of 18 meters welded together so around 220 kgs or 485 lbs for you non-metric people, and with only three workers on site at this time one of them being 64 year old Ming this ended up being a bit of a challenge.

DSC_0380.JPG
One of the 18 meter beams being transported Thai style. Wheels removed from the barrows used to pour concrete!

Having got it to site the next problem was a system to get it onto the columns. Luckily Ming, who is a professional builder, had all the equipment and a pulley arrangement was put in place. Unfortunately the first attempt failed as the two stack scaffolding they built didn’t give the height needed to winch the beam above the level of the column and they found out that manually lifting it the extra height was out of the question. Phone calls were made and a guy who had borrowed some scaffolding from Ming was instructed to give it back quicktime!

DSC_0351.JPG
The final solution.

Height now achieved the beam was manouvered into place. This was a one day operation and I was a bit worried as there were another eleven beams to do. Of course in most western countries a crane would have been hired and the whole thing done in half a day.

The next few days is really just more of the same. Steel beams either being moved from the family home or being constructed on-site and being winched into place using the same method. I won't bore you with lots of photos of what I have already shown you.

In week 1 of the build I spoke about getting power to the site. At the time I hadn't realised that it was just temporary and that I all I needed to calculate was the power required for the build NOT what the house would need to function once finished. I ended up paying for a large 30/100 amp supply when a smaller version might have been fine. No problems because the extra money paid for the meter is refunded when the permanent supply is installed once the house is complete.

However the good news is that Ming has two welding machines and has been able to operate both at the same time as a result of the larger power supply. He felt that the 15/45 might not have done the job. The experts out there can advise. If true, it is then a useful tip to ask the builder what equipment he/his contractors intends to use, especially welders which consume heaps of juice, and select your temporary power supply accordingly.

I have been watching the welding process both for those following the build for more technical reasons and for my own peace of mind. Attaching a roof to the house rates pretty highly in my list of essential things to achieve in a build! I have to report that in my case this has been a slightly haphazard process, in that each attachment of column rebar to steel beam has been done differently according to how the available attachment points presented themselves. I suspect that in a western build the process would be more engineered into the design phase. I am happy with the end result though and don’t believe the roof will end up next door anytime soon. Others may have a different opinion.

I have used a “short” column as an example because the process is best shown here, as the rebar is exposed, and it was replicated with all the other connection points across the house. In my mind the beams would have been best placed to slip between the column rebar and this rebar would then be welded to the sides of the beam. However the double C beams were pretty thick and maybe this was an accuracy unattainable in a Thai build.

DSC_0429.JPG
Secured underneath. The column has since had the concrete extended to beam level.

The approach in my case was to access the rebar wherever it touch UNDER the beam, which sometimes involved cutting away a little of the top of the column to expose the rebar. These points would then be welded to the beam. All beam to beam joins were welded along the full seam, not spot welded. This included the top of the join, an task I was pleased to see happen automatically without me asking for it.

Any rebar that didn’t need to be cut to allow for the positioning of the beam and extended next to the beam was then welded to the beam. The end result is a clumsy but effective connection of the beams to the column rebar and I think will do the job.

DSC_0475.JPG
Column rebar welded to the side of the beam and also welded to the two remaining rebar points underneath the beam.

Day 41 Thursday, a group of four guys turned up and evidently they are the concrete slab crew and ready to start work. I thought we were finishing the roof first and then the slab but according to Ming there will now be his workers completing the roof and the external gang preparing for and organising the concrete pour planned for next Tuesday.

This stopped further work on the roof as attention was turned to fitting the plumbing that would eventually sit under the slab.

Day 42 Friday, I had a vivid example of the benefits of being on-site regularly when we arrived back from a Thai Watsadu run to find that my precious P-Traps hadn’t been fitted to the floor wastes! It was only a miscommunication mixing instructions relating to P-Traps and the venting pipe and easily corrected but shows how quickly things can go wrong. The people who try to supervise from overseas have their work cut out. Not something I would like to do.

I had previously stated that the steel ordered included the rebar for the slab – wrong. Another order was required from Gaun’s sister in Udon. Ordered in the morning delivered afternoon as it would be needed over the weekend for the slab reinforcement. The order also included some extra steel for what will become the eves. The problem with designing a 13 meter house using 6 meter steel beams!

Ming has been worried that steel like this left on site might disappear overnight. So far he has spent three nights sleeping in his truck to make sure this doesn't happen. As he is only providing labour and any loss would be my problem and cost I think this is a pretty decent thing to do. I have been very lucky with my choice of builder.

The final activity for the week was to get the soil levelled ready for the concrete gang who would start Saturday.

DSC_0117.JPG
Once again I find large machinery in my lounge room.


DSC_0122.JPG
The finished product as at close of business Week 6.

Hang in for Week 7 when all going well the roof will have taken shape and we will have a concrete slab poured. Fingers crossed.

I have edited this post to make it more focussed for coolthaihouse. The extended version can be found here http://tonyinthailand.com/building-isaan-week-6/ with lots of photos and the costs to date.
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Re: Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Postby Thaipom26 » Mon Dec 15, 2014 9:10 pm

For anyone interested in following someone trying to get double glazing for their Isaan home I have posted a new topic here http://www.coolthaihouse.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=29&t=4833 or here http://tonyinthailand.com/building-isaan-windows/
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Re: Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Postby pipoz » Mon Dec 15, 2014 9:36 pm

Hi

is that one continuous 18m section or 3 x 6 meter sections welded together?

Is it a 150mm x 75mm steel section? am I close.

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Re: Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Tue Dec 16, 2014 6:53 am

However the good news is that Ming has two welding machines and has been able to operate both at the same time as a result of the larger power supply. He felt that the 15/45 might not have done the job. The experts out there can advise. If true, it is then a useful tip to ask the builder what equipment he/his contractors intends to use, especially welders which consume heaps of juice, and select your temporary power supply accordingly.


As he seems to like the trani not an inverter he could be right. If he ever tried an inverter he probably would change his mind, they are smoother and use half the power.

The only problem is that trani's are bullet-proof inverters, not so much. :roll:
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Re: Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Postby Thaipom26 » Tue Dec 16, 2014 8:40 pm

Pipoz they were two C sections of 3 x 6 meter lengths welded together. The lengths were cut so the welds were offset on the two sides. This is what the specs are:

DSC_0457.JPG
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Re: Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Postby claynlr » Wed Dec 17, 2014 8:02 am

As far as the C-sections Tony is using, what does each dimension signify?...125x50x20x3.2...I am guessing 125mm tall x 50mm wide with 20mm being the lenghth of the two tabs that turn down where the steel is welded together and 3.2mm being the thickness?
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Re: Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Postby Thaipom26 » Tue Dec 23, 2014 10:27 am

Week 7 December 13 - 19
This was the week that the shape of our house became a reality with both the roof structure and concrete slab completed.

Day 43 Saturday, the concrete slab team of four guys turned up first thing and started the preparation work to get the ground levelled and the sand down ready to lay out the rebar for the slab.

Meanwhile Ming’s three workers continued to build the roof. It was a very pleasing sight to see eight people working on the site rather than Ming + one, which we got down to at one stage. We headed to Nong Bua Lamphu and Thai Watsadu to pick up a couple of rolls of black plastic to lay on top of the sand and under the rebar as a vapor barrier and to slow concrete drying period.

DSC_0141.JPG
Levelled and black plastic being laid out. All plumbing complete including P-Traps!

Ming is mostly pretty on top of his job. He incorporated the electrical conduit to bring electricity into the house under the slab. He wants to bring power from the roadside pole to the house underground, which shows an unusual sensitivity for the aesthetics of the build for a Thai.

By the end of the day the slab team were starting to lay out the rebar, which was to be constructed on site, a task I was pleased not to have to do. We decided do this as the off-the-shelf versions were made from thin rebar and everything else in the build has been of quality so why stop now? The extra labour costs would be covered by Ming and he didn’t have any problems in going down this route.

Day 44 Sunday, gotta love the 7 day a week build. The roof guys started to put up the central supporting beam that will form the ridge to the roof.

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Workers above and below.

Day 45 Monday, the preparation for the slab was finished today and the concrete pour booked for the morning. Ming and team made great progress on one half of the roof.

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Starts to look like a roof.

Meanwhile we hit the road to Udon Thani with the mission to find the alternative supplier of Windsor windows as I had been told through udonmap.com, a local forum, that they were a cheaper alternative to EK Decorate, the better known of the two suppliers in Udon. This one is located on Thong Yai road with Bangkok Hospital on your left. The shop is about .5km on your right shortly after it becomes a lot narrower. You’ll see a large construction material yard when you arrive but it is easy to miss. Just drive in and ask for Khun Yok. Nothing like EK. No fancy displays but the people are really friendly and helpful and the head lady speaks pretty good English, something missing at EK Decorate.

I am still struggling with selecting the right combination of windows. This second Windsor supplier came in with the best quote to date by quite a margin. However the best Windsor can do for a double glazing profile is a 5/6/5, that is 5 mm glass, 6 mm spacer and 5 mm glass, which is less than the one I wanted being 6/9/5. The difference in the glass size is supposed to help with noise reduction.

I am minded to get the double glazing from DeKu in Chonburi because they will send a team to install and offered a competitive price, and the single glazed units from Windsor 2. BTW they quoted in 6 mm for the single glass, a better result than the standard 5 mm you will get from the major building suppliers like Thai Watsadu or Global House.

Back at the house all was ready for the big day tomorrow.

Day 46 Tuesday, Ming, Gaun and I went early to the concrete supplier and signed off on the order with a 10,000 THB deposit. I ended up selecting the highest grade of mix, which would normally be used for driveways or garages. I was mindful of the one meter surround to the house which had been recently made with soil that hadn’t had a lot of time to compact. Evidently a ST 180 is the one most used by Thais and the cheapest, ST 220 the next and ST 240 the one I got. Who knows, it may all be the same mix but there is supposed to be more concrete in my mix. 1800 THB per cubic meter. Two trucks delivering one with a five and the other a six cubic meter capacity.

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The first delivery of concrete sliding down. It may not look much to you but it was a highlight of the build for me.

The first batch of concrete was very wet, which is a Thai thing reading the forums. I asked Ming via Gaun to get them to hold back on the water and the other deliveries looked a lot better.

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From the water tank platform looking across to the front of the house.

We ended up with 26 cubic meters at a cost of 46,800 THB. A small amount left over was used to partly seal one of the driveways into the family home in a rough way. Better than mud in the wet season.

Day 47 Wednesday, the formwork was removed and all attention moved back to the roof. Ming has had a problem ordering the correct qualities of steel needed to build the roof so we had to make a trip to Nong Bua Lamphu and the super new Global House, which opened 6 December, just in time for my build. As we were taking Ming’s truck we also bought the septic and water tanks both 2,000 ltrs.

The roof is getting a bit of attention from the local Thais who drop in to follow progress. I don’t think they have seen many hip roofs.

Day 48 Thursday, having almost completed the main structure of the roof the steel cross pieces into which the Colorbond would be screwed, purlins in English building terms, were next to go in. Ming was true to his word and all the welding joints were painted with anti-corrosion paint.

We made a trip back again to Nong Bua Lamphu and Thai Watsadu because they had a special on AAC blocks for the walls at 16.5 THB a block, a saving of 3 THb each. We need 4,860 of them – more because of our double thickness block walls. Unfortunately delivery is going to take a week with them arriving on 25, 26 ad 27 December – it must be a really small truck or maybe a tuk tuk!

Day 49 Friday, into Si Bun Ruang and the builder’s supply shop we got the concrete from to buy the decorative board that would be attached to the metal facial. We also picked up a few extra steel purlins and four concrete rings which will become the grey water seepage tanks once installed.

Our final trip to Global House for the week had us buying 300 meters of 90 cm wide silver foil insulation with a 5 mm foam backing, which will be laid directly under the Colorbond for both heat and noise reduction. A tin roof in a tropical rainstorm stops all conversation underneath it. We will also be putting further insulation on top of the ceilings to exclude roof space heat, retain air conditioning cool and reduce noise.

For those interested in the technical details the rafters/joists are 1.8 mtrs apart centre to centre and the purlins 1.0 mtr.

We selected the two toilets for the ensuites and possibly the vanities. The toilets are on special for December so we’ll pick them up soon. You’ll be the first to see the photos!

With the roof finished Ming was able to review his calculations for the amount of Colorbond roofing we needed, got them double checked and is ready to order. Unfortunately we have a week to wait for delivery on both roofing and the concrete blocks. The pace of the build has outstripped the supply sources so Week 8 might be a quiet time. The septic and grey water tanks being dug in doesn't make for a sexy building report but who knows what else might happen.

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The steel facia being welded on.

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End of the week

A big week on costs with nearly A$10,000 heading out of the bank account. A$27,000 in expenses so far including prepayments on the AAC blocks and 1/3 deposit on Colorbond. I am still budgeting for a 1.8 million build with a 10% contingency.

More photos and the expenses spreadsheet here http://tonyinthailand.com/building-isaan-week-7/
Thaipom26
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2013 9:24 am
Location: Si Bun Ruang, Nong Bua Lamphu, Isaan

Re: Building in Si Bun Ruang, Isaan

Postby pipoz » Tue Dec 23, 2014 11:29 am

Looking good, quite a lot done for only 49 days

pipoz
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pipoz
 
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Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2012 10:41 pm
Location: Udon Thani Sometimes

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