House in BanThi, Lamphun

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Re: House in BanThi, Lamphun

Postby Mike Judd » Fri Sep 26, 2014 6:45 am

Mike Judd wrote:It still didn't come up Cream.? Have to try again later.


Tried again but maybe this needs to go in the "How to for Dummies"
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Re: House in BanThi, Lamphun

Postby Mike Judd » Fri Sep 26, 2014 6:49 am

Success at last, a good start for the day.
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Re: House in BanThi, Lamphun

Postby oil » Fri Jan 16, 2015 2:00 am

Quite some time moved into the land now, and plans changed several times but untill yesterday we still didnt had a rough estimate on the price.
Yesterday we did get one, which was a bit a shocker for me cause i somewhat calculated roughly as 10.000 Baht per sqm and the given price was more like 17.000 Baht per sqm.

Too save costs we decided to make it one storey, the space for the higher ceiling we wouldnt need anyway,

I am still in the need to save some more money hence i hope i can get some answers here on the following questions:

1) QCon / AAC Blocks seems to be great material against the heat. From what i read they let the heat pass out quickly, and have a high resistance to block the heat ....
1a - Question: wouldnt it be natural to assume if i run the AirCon inside the nice cold gets out quickly as well due the material not being able to hold temperature?
1b - Question: Would also be the assumption right that in wintertime this will be some super frosty house?
1c - Question: If i am have a walk around porch, and every piece of the Wall in in the Shadow below the roof already, would i really benefit from those stones and if so ... how?

2) Reg. Double Glass Windows, they are good for heat and noise but similar to 1c above
2a - Question: if i have a walk around porch, and i have not direct sunlight heating up any of my windows, would i really have a massive benefit from double glass windows?

3) From talks with several people i learned over and over again, that a insultated subceiling seems to be the most crucial insulation to get the heat out of the building. Even on one story houses its better to have a cement roof on top to block most of the heat. I loved the idea, but the full cement version was actually tooo expensive in my case so they where planning with a steelframe where they can put insultaion in between, also quite pricey. Then we came up with a more widespread steel from contrustion so that the subceiling is not walkable, but still insulated everywhere ... i would have liked it as additonal storage as well thou :D
3a - Question: Whats your view on the insulated subceiling? would you go for a full cement version?

4) Anybody good with Compass-Bagua Feng Shui here?
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Re: House in BanThi, Lamphun

Postby Roger Ramjet » Fri Jan 16, 2015 6:15 am

oil wrote:1) QCon / AAC Blocks seems to be great material against the heat. From what i read they let the heat pass out quickly, and have a high resistance to block the heat ....
1a - Question: wouldnt it be natural to assume if i run the AirCon inside the nice cold gets out quickly as well due the material not being able to hold temperature?
1b - Question: Would also be the assumption right that in wintertime this will be some super frosty house?
1c - Question: If i am have a walk around porch, and every piece of the Wall in in the Shadow below the roof already, would i really benefit from those stones and if so ... how?

2) Reg. Double Glass Windows, they are good for heat and noise but similar to 1c above
2a - Question: if i have a walk around porch, and i have not direct sunlight heating up any of my windows, would i really have a massive benefit from double glass windows?

You've been listening to all the wrong people. Firstly the "builder" who quoted you that astronomical figure per sq metre is in another country.
You should read the threads about AAC blocks.
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Re: House in BanThi, Lamphun

Postby oil » Fri Jan 16, 2015 11:47 am

You should read the threads about AAC blocks.


i assume you refer to that thread
viewtopic.php?f=7&t=4601&hilit=aac+blocks&start=45
did read that, couldnt really find those specific answers in there, besides the general concept seems to be that the red bricks are just soo shitty thats in any way its better to use the AACs
or you where reffering to another AAC thread?
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Re: House in BanThi, Lamphun

Postby Roger Ramjet » Fri Jan 16, 2015 7:02 pm

oil wrote:i assume you refer to that thread

I apologise for being so blunt in my reply, however, I had problems with the internet this morning and couldn't risk a longer reply.
AAC blocks are insulation by themselves, they neither carry the heat nor the cold. They are referred to in Australia as "superblock".
The heat sources you should worry about are the windows, doors, concrete roof (which you should only use if you are going to build another story on top of the house at a later stage) and columns and beams. Superblock will not carry the heat or the cold.
Builders here tend to quote on sq metres, or whatever they dream at the time. I had at least 6 different quotes ranging from 12 million (architect with building company) down to 770,000 from the people who would supply all the concrete (FastCrete) which they said was a fair price for the shell and laying of the superblock. I supplied everything, they just supplied the labour. My house is over 250 sq metres. I settled with a builder who had experience and I had seen his work. He quoted me 1.3 million which included plumbing, electrics and other sundries. I also had a quote of 1.1 million from a builder who had "no previous experience" but his wife did. He wanted to do the house "his way" while his wife wanted to work from the plans. That was a no brainer.
You must get quotes and stop listening to would be's if they could be's. You need at least 6 quotes and they should all supply photos (at least) of the builds they have done and completed.
Be aware when I put the word out about the build I had ten sets of plans that were handed out to each prospective builder. I also had a fair idea what was a reasonable price because I had lurked here for two years reading all the building stories.
I then started my building thread early so I could get additional feedback. I even changed the size of the superblock from 20 to 7.5 X 2 so I could run the pipes and electrics inside the air gap.
Be warned, at the end of the build the "builder" will want to be off as quick as possible, leaving you with a mess.
Good luck with your build, but instead of working out the cost by the sq metre, which I happen to totally disagree with and say it is only a really really rough guide, try talking to a lot of people in places like Thai Watsadu, Home Mart, and HomePro, they will give you a better picture. I even left two sets of plans with my local Thai Watsadu store, which is where my concrete supplier picked up one and also another builder who wanted "farang" prices.
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Re: House in BanThi, Lamphun

Postby oil » Sat Jan 17, 2015 11:39 am

Roger Ramjet wrote:
oil wrote:i assume you refer to that thread

I apologise for being so blunt in my reply, however, I had problems with the internet this morning and couldn't risk a longer reply.
Lol i know that feeling, thx anyways
AAC blocks are insulation by themselves, they neither carry the heat nor the cold. They are referred to in Australia as "superblock".
The heat sources you should worry about are the windows, doors, concrete roof (which you should only use if you are going to build another story on top of the house at a later stage) and columns and beams. Superblock will not carry the heat or the cold.
Builders here tend to quote on sq metres, or whatever they dream at the time. I had at least 6 different quotes ranging from 12 million (architect with building company) down to 770,000
Wow that is some range, but thx, will ask for a shitloat of more quotes
from the people who would supply all the concrete (FastCrete) which they said was a fair price for the shell and laying of the superblock. I supplied everything, they just supplied the labour. My house is over 250 sq metres. I settled with a builder who had experience and I had seen his work. He quoted me 1.3 million which included plumbing, electrics and other sundries. I also had a quote of 1.1 million from a builder who had "no previous experience" but his wife did. He wanted to do the house "his way" while his wife wanted to work from the plans. That was a no brainer.
You must get quotes and stop listening to would be's if they could be's. You need at least 6 quotes and they should all supply photos (at least) of the builds they have done and completed.
Be aware when I put the word out about the build I had ten sets of plans that were handed out to each prospective builder. I also had a fair idea what was a reasonable price because I had lurked here for two years reading all the building stories.
I then started my building thread early so I could get additional feedback. I even changed the size of the superblock from 20 to 7.5 X 2
thats 20 to 7.5 X 2 sounds like a good idea, thb
so I could run the pipes and electrics inside the air gap.
Be warned, at the end of the build the "builder" will want to be off as quick as possible, leaving you with a mess.
Good luck with your build, but instead of working out the cost by the sq metre, which I happen to totally disagree with and say it is only a really really rough guide, try talking to a lot of people in places like Thai Watsadu, Home Mart, and HomePro, they will give you a better picture. I even left two sets of plans with my local Thai Watsadu store, which is where my concrete supplier picked up one and also another builder who wanted "farang" prices.


thx[/quote] [quote]
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Re: House in BanThi, Lamphun

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Sat Jan 17, 2015 10:29 pm

oil wrote:Quite some time moved into the land now, and plans changed several times but untill yesterday we still didnt had a rough estimate on the price.
Yesterday we did get one, which was a bit a shocker for me cause i somewhat calculated roughly as 10.000 Baht per sqm and the given price was more like 17.000 Baht per sqm.

Too save costs we decided to make it one storey, the space for the higher ceiling we wouldnt need anyway,

I am still in the need to save some more money hence i hope i can get some answers here on the following questions:

1) QCon / AAC Blocks seems to be great material against the heat. From what i read they let the heat pass out quickly, and have a high resistance to block the heat ....


You need to understand the basic physics involved.

Insulation slows heat transfer. Cold to hot. Hot to cold. Same same but different

oil wrote:1a - Question: wouldnt it be natural to assume if i run the AirCon inside the nice cold gets out quickly as well due the material not being able to hold temperature?


NO see above

oil wrote:1b - Question: Would also be the assumption right that in wintertime this will be some super frosty house?


NO see above
oil wrote:1c - Question: If i am have a walk around porch, and every piece of the Wall in in the Shadow below the roof already, would i really benefit from those stones and if so ... how?


Yes because the cold A/C will stay inside

oil wrote:2) Reg. Double Glass Windows, they are good for heat and noise but similar to 1c above
2a - Question: if i have a walk around porch, and i have not direct sunlight heating up any of my windows, would i really have a massive benefit from double glass windows?


Yes because they slow down heat transfer to the rooms. DG has less effect in direct sun.


oil wrote:3) From talks with several people i learned over and over again, that a insultated subceiling seems to be the most crucial insulation to get the heat out of the building. Even on one story houses its better to have a cement roof on top to block most of the heat. I loved the idea, but the full cement version was actually tooo expensive in my case so they where planning with a steelframe where they can put insultaion in between, also quite pricey. Then we came up with a more widespread steel from contrustion so that the subceiling is not walkable, but still insulated everywhere ... i would have liked it as additonal storage as well thou :D


Wrong, wrong, wrong. Cement is a great heat way to store heat. a light insulated ceiling is good for an AC space

oil wrote:3a - Question: Whats your view on the insulated subceiling? would you go for a full cement version?

insulated subceiling; yes
for a full cement version; no way

And just FYI 17.000 Baht per sqm is a turnkey very high end, fully finished, luxury quote complete with top class white goods, fitted bedrooms and kitchen
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Re: House in BanThi, Lamphun

Postby oil » Sat Jan 17, 2015 11:16 pm

hey, much thx for the detailed in depth answer, much appreciated
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Re: House in BanThi, Lamphun

Postby pipoz » Sun Jan 18, 2015 12:41 am

oil wrote:hey, much thx for the detailed in depth answer, much appreciated


Building a reasonable quality single story house for between TB 12,000 to 13,000 per m2, is very achievable, in the Issan areas.

You can spend a lot per m2, on your internal finishes, windows, doors & services, but that becomes a personal choice.

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