Building A House In Chiang Mai At The Worst Possible Time

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Re: Building A House In Chiang Mai At The Worst Possible Tim

Postby Galee » Sun May 26, 2013 10:04 pm

Greenside wrote:The sides of the forms were removed yesterday and much of the bamboo support work will go today leaving two or three per span. It all looks very tall and I have to keep reminding myself that the edge of the roof will be lower than the top of the beams which will restore the proportions somewhat.


As this is a one storey building, I don't understand why all the re-inforced beams?. Constructed differently to mine. I must have the the el-cheapo version. :D
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Re: Building A House In Chiang Mai At The Worst Possible Tim

Postby Mike Judd » Mon May 27, 2013 7:02 am

Yes that's my question as well, I assumed it was a 2 storey when seeing those beams and had a look back in the posts to check. It wasn't clear still, but thought that it was going to be a very large house if it was 2 storey. Most of us go the Thai way with steel sections welded to the top of the columns to support the roof.
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Re: Building A House In Chiang Mai At The Worst Possible Tim

Postby fredlk » Mon May 27, 2013 7:13 am

Mike Judd wrote:Yes that's my question as well, I assumed it was a 2 storey when seeing those beams and had a look back in the posts to check. It wasn't clear still, but thought that it was going to be a very large house if it was 2 storey. Most of us go the Thai way with steel sections welded to the top of the columns to support the roof.

My single storey house also has a concrete ring beam on top of the columns for extra strength in supporting the large roof overhangs of up to 4 metres.
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Re: Building A House In Chiang Mai At The Worst Possible Tim

Postby Mike Judd » Mon May 27, 2013 3:31 pm

Wow ! 4 mt overhang, now I understand why the concrete beams. Having had a lot to do with canterlevers in the Rigging game, I appreciate how much extra load is transmitted back to it's last support. Because of the leverage effect there is a far greater pressure there than the actual load of the overhang itself. That's apart from the truss structure itself to cope with 4 mt unsupported overhang with out bending.
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Re: Building A House In Chiang Mai At The Worst Possible Tim

Postby Greenside » Mon May 27, 2013 7:02 pm

Our overhangs aren't in the 4m class (1.3m if I remember rightly) but the change from steel to concrete beams came at the suggestion of the contractor along with a different layout for some of the foundation pillars and produced a net cost saving. We have a roof that provides shade around the pool deck but that has it's own set of columns for support.
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Steelwork Day 1

Postby Greenside » Wed May 29, 2013 10:40 am

They delivered the steel last week and this morning three men arrived to paint it. They were going to spray it in the usual way but my architect, khun Top, wanted it dipped which he said gave more reliable coverage so they brought along a piece of stainless from the workshop that makes gutters. I'm going to try a time lapse of the dipping but since none of the guys speak English and the foreman isn't here yet they regarded the GoPro I left out there on the tripod with some suspicion - Big Brother IS watching you :)

Image

Image

I don't know what the grades of steel are, but someone visiting said they are using good quality stock. I'm more concerned about the quality of the welds as we had a poor experience with the current house and had to have the welder back several times to tidy up and make good.
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Re: Building A House In Chiang Mai At The Worst Possible Tim

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Wed May 29, 2013 12:54 pm

I think you will find that it is 2.3mm thickness which AFAIR is one of the thinner ones.

If you want pictures of good quality welding my "water house" thread has some.

I will be very interested in the pics of the dipping process.
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Re: Building A House In Chiang Mai At The Worst Possible Tim

Postby Greenside » Wed May 29, 2013 5:13 pm

Seems like neither the crew or Top had really thought the dipping process through on a practical level with a large number of purlins to do so it was slow to get going. Unfortunately, the battery on the camera failed at the beginning of the exercise so I only have one picture to post. Once they'd fashioned a set of simple handling tools out of scrap metal they dipped four at a time in thinned grey primer. The tedious part of the operation was that one end of the 6m length had then to be raised and held in the air in order to drain the primer inside and we put a single scaffolding tower section there to take the weight, but nevertheless it took about three or four minutes to reduce the stream to drops. After that they were laid out to dry in the normal way with minimal wastage and evenly coated inside and out.

Image

A better solution might be to have a second length of gutter and a tall support so that the lengths could be stood almost vertically and allowed to drain at the same time. With a bit of ingenuity the excess primer could be collected perhaps via a simple rain hopper every ten minutes and returned to the dip. This would need a bit more preparation but speed the process up considerably.
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Unloading the Scaffolding

Postby Greenside » Wed May 29, 2013 5:46 pm

Just as I completed the last post a truck arrived with a load of something which turned out to be a couple of tons of scaffolding - yes, the real thing with four way clips and galvanised steel tubes. I was amazed. I've never seen anyone using it here; it's either bamboo or dozens (hundreds in some cases) of those 1500 baht mini tower things put together and nailed to the building with a wing and a prayer. It looked a bit rough but a cut above the other options.

I was just wondering how the one guy was going to unload it when he simply tipped the truck bed and drove forward dumping the lot on the ground which is almost certainly why it looks so beaten up.

Amazing Thailand. :D
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Re: Building A House In Chiang Mai At The Worst Possible Tim

Postby Mike Judd » Thu May 30, 2013 5:33 am

i would certainly be interested in seeing the Tube and fittings scaffolding when erected as the A frame scaffold is the preferred alternative to bamboo in most of Thailand if not the rest of Asia. Tipping it all off of the truck would be a great way to making a lot of bent and useless tube in time, But the Thai's ingenuity will probably come into play there, especially as there are no regulations for them to have to comply with, like hand rails/kick boards/more than one plank to work on and proper Ties /bracing.
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Re: Building A House In Chiang Mai At The Worst Possible Tim

Postby Tommy » Fri May 31, 2013 5:48 pm

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1369997097.873925.jpg

"A-Frame" that's welded together by Et using left over steel bars. Mike, is this what you are talking about?

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1369997171.639540.jpg

Is this the scaffolding u r talking about? I'm surprised when my FiL asked me to buy 2 sets back. Really assumed that nobody uses it here and just hammer together some sort of support as they had been doing with wood planks so far.
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Scaffolding

Postby Greenside » Fri May 31, 2013 8:11 pm

The kind of scaffolding they delivered (er...dumped) the other day was like this:

Image

.....although not so much of it!

The lower of your two pictures is what they have been using on our job up to now and I have one of my own too. Very useful but rather heavy. I've only really noticed locals using this in the past year or two but saw a whole building covered to a height of at least 5 floors last week with these very same units stacked together and secured to the wall every so often with what looked like concrete nails through a plate. Our workers used the plastic beam forms as planks to stand on and they work very well and save a lot of weight.
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Bricks Arrive

Postby Greenside » Fri May 31, 2013 9:43 pm

A blazing hot day again and a truckload of bricks arrived this morning with three ladies of indeterminate age who worked carefully and tirelessly unloading and stacking the lot. Often they just tip them out in a heap here (like the scaffolding) so we're counting ourselves lucky! Note that the guy on the truck is throwing them in threes...

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Re: Building A House In Chiang Mai At The Worst Possible Tim

Postby terp80 » Sat Jun 01, 2013 2:05 am

Hi Greensides: I am fairly new to CTH, and I am following your thread with interest, as I plan to build in Don Kaeo later this year. Don't have the budget you do :? , so my house will be only about 190+/- s.m. Good luck with the rest of your build. It really looks terrific so far. :)
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Re: Building A House In Chiang Mai At The Worst Possible Tim

Postby Mike Judd » Sat Jun 01, 2013 6:52 am

The second photo of the bought steel A frame is the one used all over Thailand (min 2 frames with 2 scissor braces) I bought 4 frames etc; with 4 wheels to make a tower and mobile if required. Global House have them. My 2 guys were knocking up scaffolds with wooden trestles until I bought those frames, then all the various contractors were borrowing them. That photo of the big Scaffold in Tube and fittings shows the correct way it's done with double hand rails and kick boards to stop tools or materials falling on workers below. But it is a bit of an over kill with all that support bracing on the out side (Very well done though) Usually ties every 10 mts horizontal and 4mts approx in height is sufficient. With the unloading of bricks, all the trucks now have mechanical means of unloading, either a small crane arm or a Fork lift unit slung on the back with everything on pallets. Before, the drivers were on a price per load and used to load and unload by hand ,usually on their own, but sometimes an offsider (Son) helping them . Bloody hard work with them sometimes picking up 6 full size bricks at a time. That was in the "Good old days"
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