Passively Cooled House

Any story related to building in the LOS, whether everything turned out hunky dory or not!

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Re: Passively Cooled House

Postby thailazer » Wed Sep 19, 2012 4:10 pm

I lived in Idaho where there were a lot of evaporative coolers, also called Swamp Coolers. They work good as long as the humidity is below 40% and you keep the water flow, mold and slime under control. They were not very desired but you saw a lot of them in trailer parks. That should tell you something.

So Poodentaine starts this thread and doesn't tell us his secrets. Maybe he just had a big roof over his place which I suppose would be a good first step! :wink:

If you want to see how earth tubes are used to cool air before it enters a house, send me a PM with your email address. (It is a big .pdf file.) The Greeks used earth tubes to cool air, and the suction inside the house was created by a sun-facing chimney that got hot causing the air to rise, pulling air through a hole at the bottom from the attached house. Sun heats chimney, sucks in air from house, air comes from buried earth tubes from a filter house a 100 meters away resulting in cool air flow on hot sunny days. Mold is the big problem again.
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Re: Passively Cooled House

Postby splitlid » Wed Sep 19, 2012 4:26 pm

2 very good books worth purchasing for anyone interested in this sort of stuff are:

Warm House Cool House by Nick Hollo.
it as been around for years and is a great addition to anyones library.

the otter is:

EcoHouse by Sue Roaf.

This one is more detailed and covers many areas of the world.
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Re: Passively Cooled House

Postby MGV12 » Wed Sep 19, 2012 5:36 pm

This may help in understanding the benefits of any type of external cooling on the human body; and the essential need for such cooling.

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hb ... oobod.html

The human body needs to lose heat ... in a climate where the air temperature can easily exceed the human body core temperature this is not always easy; even if you are a couch potato who never sees the sun nor exercise.

From actual temperature checks on my ponds the surface water is usually a maximum of 25C in the shade and due to evaporative cooling there is no significant difference in the sun. Air that moves across the surface will be at or near that temperature and, as evaporative cooling exists even in the shade, the resultant moisture in the air and the lower temperature will assist the human body in dissipating the heat generated within.

Hopefully that helps ... otherwise we can get more technical.

“Some days I am an optimistic pessimist ... other days I am a pessimistic optimist”
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Re: Passively Cooled House

Postby gliffaes » Wed Sep 19, 2012 8:34 pm

splitlid wrote:2 very good books worth purchasing for anyone interested in this sort of stuff are:

Warm House Cool House by Nick Hollo.
it as been around for years and is a great addition to anyones library.

the otter is:

EcoHouse by Sue Roaf.

This one is more detailed and covers many areas of the world.


Stay away from those "otters" they wont help you unless they can fan you??
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Re: Passively Cooled House

Postby gliffaes » Wed Sep 19, 2012 8:36 pm

Splitty you have a pool in the right location, have you found it any different?
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Re: Passively Cooled House

Postby splitlid » Wed Sep 19, 2012 9:26 pm

Hey Mate, no i really cant feel any difference at all. To me the temp is always hot and sweaty. :(
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Re: Passively Cooled House

Postby poodentaine » Wed Sep 19, 2012 10:56 pm

As fate would have it, I hit upon the right lottery numbers for a house design that takes advantage of a lot of the environmental factors that are part of northern Thailand. This design works for my wife and I, here in the province of Phayao, located just east of Doi Luang, part of the Phi Pah Nam mountain range. Taking advantage of monsoonal wind directions and prevailing conditions associated within the Lanna Kindgom, we have ascertained an almost, entirely passively cooled home. This is not to say that AC could not augment the collective inside environment, especially on those really hot, no wind, humid days. But we have managed to get by without it…having said that, I have wished several days this year, that the AC was installed in at least the office. Coming from Texas, I still don't enjoy the heat.


First off I will discuss house design. Air flow is extremely important for cooling passively in the tropics. Compartmentalized rooms will not afford this due to design flaw. We choose a design that gave us a breezeway, as our building site was in a back-filled rice paddy; there were no available trees for shading purposes. This breezeway or dog-run as it is called in southern US jargon, acted as a cooling channel for all wings of the house. The upstairs wing was designed to be unimpeded for breeze flow-thru. By having large glass walls with patio door openings facing north and south respectively, this facilitated the monsoonal breeze direction to cooling the upstairs, especially at night. The southerly facing glass wall/patio door is shaded by a terraced roof section. With a ceiling fan placed directly above the bed, we usually only have it on the lowest setting and it is more than adequate. The breezeway also gives shade to two other exterior walls of the east and west wings. The morning sun, giving the less heat of the day usually, bathes the east wing wall. High ceilings let warm air rise. Exhaust fans at ceiling height will clear the room of excess warm air. Exhaust fans mounted anywhere other than ceiling height are inadequate in getting the hot air totally out of a room. A cool attic area will in turn, lend itself to a cooler house as well. Hip roof designs do not allow for this. You need gables with gable louver venting to allow for air exchange. Also to augment this would be the vented soffit everywhere except over porch areas. A reflective color roofing is essential in keeping the attic area from becoming an oven. In rooms with regular height ceilings, rolled insulation in the attic will help greatly in keeping rooms from getting too hot from any warm attic air. Radiant barriers have been mentioned in numerous places. I have found that with adequate venting in the gables (as long as they are orientated for maximum air flow [exchange]) then there is no need for this. (I have not had to resort to this, yet anyway). A double walled construction method was used, using ACC block and red brick with an airspace in between. The west wing is raised 1 m off the ground and the under skirting has two rows of breeze block at the top on all sides (3). This keeps the kitchen, dining room and living room floor cool at all times. I can put my hand on the interior west facing wall in the evening and it is as cool as it was in the morning. Again, reflective color schemes help greatly. While it is true that I can only catch the cool morning air, if the house is closed up before 9:00, it will stay remarkably cool, all day long. PE
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Re: Passively Cooled House

Postby poodentaine » Thu Sep 20, 2012 7:10 am

I have given up trying to post any photos...this site is BS for easy use. I will post elsewhere and direct to it. PE

<You might try looking at the following: How to post an attachment which gives instructions on how to post an attachment to the forum. It is actually very easy and straightforward. - Dozer>
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Re: Passively Cooled House

Postby fredlk » Thu Sep 20, 2012 7:34 am

poodentaine wrote:...this site is BS for easy use.

Even our admittedly most 'illiterate' member can post photos and use this website. What exactly is the problem? "Upload Attachment" and it's done.
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Re: Passively Cooled House

Postby gliffaes » Thu Sep 20, 2012 1:49 pm

poodentaine wrote:As fate would have it, I hit upon the right lottery numbers for a house design that takes advantage of a lot of the environmental factors that are part of northern Thailand. This design works for my wife and I, here in the province of Phayao, located just east of Doi Luang, part of the Phi Pah Nam mountain range. Taking advantage of monsoonal wind directions and prevailing conditions associated within the Lanna Kindgom, we have ascertained an almost, entirely passively cooled home. This is not to say that AC could not augment the collective inside environment, especially on those really hot, no wind, humid days. But we have managed to get by without it…having said that, I have wished several days this year, that the AC was installed in at least the office. Coming from Texas, I still don't enjoy the heat.


First off I will discuss house design. Air flow is extremely important for cooling passively in the tropics. Compartmentalized rooms will not afford this due to design flaw. We choose a design that gave us a breezeway, as our building site was in a back-filled rice paddy; there were no available trees for shading purposes. This breezeway or dog-run as it is called in southern US jargon, acted as a cooling channel for all wings of the house. The upstairs wing was designed to be unimpeded for breeze flow-thru. By having large glass walls with patio door openings facing north and south respectively, this facilitated the monsoonal breeze direction to cooling the upstairs, especially at night. The southerly facing glass wall/patio door is shaded by a terraced roof section. With a ceiling fan placed directly above the bed, we usually only have it on the lowest setting and it is more than adequate. The breezeway also gives shade to two other exterior walls of the east and west wings. The morning sun, giving the less heat of the day usually, bathes the east wing wall. High ceilings let warm air rise. Exhaust fans at ceiling height will clear the room of excess warm air. Exhaust fans mounted anywhere other than ceiling height are inadequate in getting the hot air totally out of a room. A cool attic area will in turn, lend itself to a cooler house as well. Hip roof designs do not allow for this. You need gables with gable louver venting to allow for air exchange. Also to augment this would be the vented soffit everywhere except over porch areas. A reflective color roofing is essential in keeping the attic area from becoming an oven. In rooms with regular height ceilings, rolled insulation in the attic will help greatly in keeping rooms from getting too hot from any warm attic air. Radiant barriers have been mentioned in numerous places. I have found that with adequate venting in the gables (as long as they are orientated for maximum air flow [exchange]) then there is no need for this. (I have not had to resort to this, yet anyway). A double walled construction method was used, using ACC block and red brick with an airspace in between. The west wing is raised 1 m off the ground and the under skirting has two rows of breeze block at the top on all sides (3). This keeps the kitchen, dining room and living room floor cool at all times. I can put my hand on the interior west facing wall in the evening and it is as cool as it was in the morning. Again, reflective color schemes help greatly. While it is true that I can only catch the cool morning air, if the house is closed up before 9:00, it will stay remarkably cool, all day long. PE


Thats all well and good but you are using fans which is mechanical , the fact remains you arent cooling lower than ambient temps.
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Re: Passively Cooled House

Postby gliffaes » Thu Sep 20, 2012 1:52 pm

fredlk wrote:
poodentaine wrote:...this site is BS for easy use.

Even our admittedly most 'illiterate' member can post photos and use this website. What exactly is the problem? "Upload Attachment" and it's done.


The problem Fred is the file sizes allowed, they really could do with being increased or at least the 800x600 sizes which most new widescreen cameras arent so you continually have to resize kb's and the 800x600 pixels.
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Re: Passively Cooled House

Postby fredlk » Thu Sep 20, 2012 2:23 pm

gliffaes wrote:The problem Fred is the file sizes allowed, they really could do with being increased or at least the 800x600 sizes which most new widescreen cameras arent so you continually have to resize kb's and the 800x600 pixels.

See my pm to not get further off-topic.
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Re: Passively Cooled House

Postby Psychic » Sat May 25, 2013 12:21 pm

To try and resurrect this thread I have been doing a little research on earth cooling tubes. They clearly work if done correctly in arid environments. I have read that they are not so effective in hot humid countries such as Thailand. I was looking at a company called Amvic that claims they lowered the temperature of a house in Washington DC from 38 to around 28 with their system. From what I know Washington was build on a swamp and is extremely humid, so it would seem that it could work. On the website there is a diagram of the earth pipe cooling system if it seems sensible, when I build i would strongly consider making my own system. If I got the piping into the house, the major cost would be digging the 8-10 foot trench for about 100 feet either on a line or around the house as they show. I would probably lay 2 pipes in parallel and split one into each of the bedrooms I plan on having. Proper grading and condensate drainage is very important, but if this is done properly I don't see why it shouldnt work. Not sure if I'm allowed to post a link to their brochure but here it is,


http://www.amvicsystem.com/upload/REHAU ... _Amvic.pdf
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Re: Passively Cooled House

Postby unclezillion » Mon Jun 03, 2013 7:46 am

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Re: Building a Company Building and Ranch Type House

Postby hansbak » Sun Jun 09, 2013 4:42 pm

Not sure if you had this article?

call the "Hoffman house" ?

http://www.hoffmanarchitecture.com/sebfhome.png

regards,
Hans

I posted this message in the wrong forum and see no way to delete it.
Moderator, can you please move this message to the http://www.coolthaihouse.com/forum/view ... 6&start=30
forum? Thanks! <no problem ... however there does appear to be a problem with the link as provided - mod>
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