oor hoose build in Minburi

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Re: oor hoose build in Minburi

Postby saorsa » Thu Aug 16, 2012 11:41 am

BKKBILL wrote:If you are looking for longer spans PPC has a good site giving information on hollow core slabs to a maximum of seven meters for the 120x1200 size. Solid planks up to 4 M.

More info at

http://pccnew.pcc-concrete.co.th/index. ... -core-slab

Using precast planks are cost effective and lets you have an air space under flooring for cooling. I used the hollow core on my build with good results.

As sirineou mentioned Google sketch up will let you draw your build to scale. Youtube has videos to help with the learning curve.

Here is a site to wet your feet.

http://www.brighthub.com/internet/googl ... 12038.aspx


The precast planks look interesting. I thought in Thailand, the normal way was to cast the floor in concrete and lift it into place with a crane.

Sweet Home 3D also does drawings to scale. I just can't work out how to rotate multiple selections at the same time. Individual items can be rotated no problem, but you don't get the option once you select more than one item. It will do for what I need anyway.
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Re: oor hoose build in Minburi

Postby geordie » Thu Aug 16, 2012 12:20 pm

Dont forget the precast planks can be installed overhead ? =soundproof ceiling
you can use a gas multipoint to distribute whole house the drawback on location is you might have half a bath/sink of cold water before the hot arrives at the top right hand corner of the page is a search box search rimini or gas water heater you should get a couple of discusions
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Re: oor hoose build in Minburi

Postby saorsa » Thu Aug 16, 2012 12:28 pm

Yes, I was thinking of the concrete ceiling for the studio room also after you posted the link.

I'm busy reading through the posts on solar power just now...will search for gas next...good job I have nothing to do at work just now! :)
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Re: oor hoose build in Minburi

Postby BKKBILL » Thu Aug 16, 2012 2:01 pm

geordie wrote:slippery advertising they do not compare with concrete because its not the same weight this one came up in discusion a couple of years ago but an indication is concrete was the specified material for "party walls" on ajoining propertie,s AAC is now allowed but the blocks are 11" and have plasterboard both sides

Not to get into a block agains block pissing match here are comments from Australian Government about AAC blocks.

http://www.yourhome.gov.au/technical/fs511.html
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Re: oor hoose build in Minburi

Postby geordie » Thu Aug 16, 2012 2:23 pm

BKKBILL wrote:Not to get into a block agains block pissing match here are comments from Australian Government about AAC blocks.

http://www.yourhome.gov.au/technical/fs511.html

http://www.yourhome.gov.au/technical/fs27.htmlBill i echo the sentiment however that does not stop me turning your own gun on you about 2 thirds of the way down the page it states concrete is better for noise reduction
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Re: oor hoose build in Minburi

Postby geordie » Thu Aug 16, 2012 2:23 pm

BKKBILL wrote:Not to get into a block agains block pissing match here are comments from Australian Government about AAC blocks.

http://www.yourhome.gov.au/technical/fs511.html

http://www.yourhome.gov.au/technical/fs27.html i echo the sentiment bill however that does not stop me turning your own gun on you about 2 thirds of the way down the page it states concrete is better for noise reduction
http://www.yourhome.gov.au/technical/fs27.html#design
if this second link works it should take you to noise and good design its in that section :roll:
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Re: oor hoose build in Minburi

Postby BKKBILL » Thu Aug 16, 2012 5:37 pm

Looked carefully but could not find the gun.

Although noticed this,

The Rw ratings of some typical wall and floor construction methods are outlined here.

Heavy dense materials, such as concrete, are generally better for sound insulation but a range of lightweight solutions are also available.
Thermal mass

The thermal performance of AAC, as for other high-mass materials, is dependent on the climate in which it is used. With its mixture of lightweight concrete and air pockets, AAC has a moderate overall level of thermal mass performance. The temperature moderating thermal mass is most useful in climates with high cooling needs.
[See: 4.9 Thermal Mass]

Insulation
With its closed air pockets, AAC can provide very good sound insulation. As with all masonry construction, care must be taken to avoid gaps and unfilled joints that can allow unwanted sound transmission. Combining the AAC wall with an insulated asymmetric cavity system will provide a wall with excellent sound insulation properties.
[See: 4.7 Insulation Overview]

Sound insulation
With its closed air pockets, AAC can provide very good sound insulation. As with all masonry construction, care must be taken to avoid gaps and unfilled joints that can allow unwanted sound transmission. Combining the AAC wall with an insulated asymmetric cavity system will provide a wall with excellent sound insulation properties.
[See: Noise Control]
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Re: oor hoose build in Minburi

Postby MGV12 » Thu Aug 16, 2012 6:00 pm

BKKBILL wrote:
Sound insulation
With its closed air pockets, AAC can provide very good sound insulation. As with all masonry construction, care must be taken to avoid gaps and unfilled joints that can allow unwanted sound transmission.


That can be a crucial factor and results can be unbelievably out of proportion to the actual gap. Bose [http://www.bose.co.uk/GB/en/learning-centre/waveguide-problem/]propelled themselves to the forefront of music reproduction by understanding the way sound travels and how a relatively small space can transmit and amplify an incredible volume of sound .. one of their earliest studies was understanding how the sound emitted by a tiny flute could fill a concert hall. There is no way of knowing if small gaps and crevices will allow the transmission of small sounds or amplify them so as to create a real problem ... fill every crack and crevice and any potential problem goes away. That's assuming that the wall itself was constructed from optimum sound-absorption materials in the first place.

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Re: oor hoose build in Minburi

Postby geordie » Thu Aug 16, 2012 6:18 pm

geordie wrote: with regard to a soundproof room try and find decent thickness concrete blocks because of the density concrete is the best for soundproofing purposes


Bill i cannot do screen shots so i copied the lot and deleted most of it as far as i can see the australian goverment back up my statement above concrete provides better sound proofing the figures are theirs the statement is theirs also notable is a 90 mm concrete block has better supresion than a 100mm AAC block unfortunately when you take thermal resistance into account AAC trumps so a happy combination is uk where we have solid outer lightweight inner walls

The Rw ratings of some typical wall and floor construction methods are outlined here.

:!: Heavy dense materials, such as concrete, are generally better for sound insulation :?: but a range of lightweight solutions

Rw42. 100mm low density AAC block with 10mm adhered plasterboard both sides.

Rw50. 90mm solid concrete block with adhered 10mm plasterboard both sides.

ADDITIONAL READING

Contact your State / Territory government or local council for further information on noise control in residential areas.
http://www.gov.au

Australian Building Codes Board (2007), Building Codes of Australia Volume 1 and 2, AGPS Canberra.
http://www.abcb.gov.au

Principal author:
Geoff Milne

Contributors:
Kendall Banfield
Chris Reardon

A joint initiative of the Australian Government and the design and construction industries.

Home | Acknowledgements | Contacts | Top |

© Commonwealth of Australia - Copyright and Disclaimers/Privacy Notice - Fourth edition with minor updates, 2010
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Re: oor hoose build in Minburi

Postby unclezillion » Sun Aug 19, 2012 9:00 am

Electric showers will be no problem for pressure providing you have a good and correctly sized water pump. The only thing you should remember is to have a high kw shower so as to heat water under pressure.Failing that you get a heater with a pump built in.
Either way shower pressure will not or should not be an issue for you.
There are also solar hot water systems being advertised in Thai home magazines but i have no experience of them; does anybody else?
I have an underwater water tank at my house. Don't forget a bypass so the mains can come straight through in case of pump problems.
Have you thought about avoiding concrete render inside the house as there are now plaster products available in Thailand?
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Re: oor hoose build in Minburi

Postby saorsa » Sun Aug 19, 2012 9:17 am

unclezillion wrote:Electric showers will be no problem for pressure providing you have a good and correctly sized water pump. The only thing you should remember is to have a high kw shower so as to heat water under pressure.Failing that you get a heater with a pump built in.
Either way shower pressure will not or should not be an issue for you.
There are also solar hot water systems being advertised in Thai home magazines but i have no experience of them; does anybody else?
I have an underwater water tank at my house. Don't forget a bypass so the mains can come straight through in case of pump problems.
Have you thought about avoiding concrete render inside the house as there are now plaster products available in Thailand?


I don't like the look of electric showers either, prefer just to have a couple of pipes to a mixer shower unit and I want in our bathroom at least one of those big round stainless shower heads. I plan building with superblock, so they have a special render from what I have been reading.
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Re: oor hoose build in Minburi

Postby unclezillion » Sun Aug 19, 2012 11:18 am

you will either have an electric shower unit or an electric hot water storage tank; what we call an immersion heater in the UK. for this you will either have to have a cupboard or risk using the roof space if you do not want it in the bathroom! I have a large shower head and a bath and use a small white heating unit that fits nicely in the corner of the bathroom. of course all this is avoided if you do not heat the water. :D
I would not take to much notice of Thais saying you must use a certain product as we have been using this type of stuff in the UK for years and plastering them with products not mentioned on the Thai websites. There are products around to stop excessive suction and in the UK we use gyprime ( or something along those lines) or do a scratch coat. which essentially is 3 coats instead of 2. The real trick with these blocks is to give them a good soaking( you will have to watch many Thais on this as they gererally do not use enough water and the concrete rendering cracks as a result) and a scratch coat before application of plaster to avoid cracking.
info on scratch coats http://www.stuccoguru.com/resources/art ... sourceID=5
in one way you are lucky because you have time to plan absolutely everything and know exactly what you want to do as you will probably have to micro manage Thai builders to get exactly what you want.
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Re: oor hoose build in Minburi

Postby MGV12 » Sun Aug 19, 2012 11:41 am

unclezillion wrote:you will have to watch many Thais on this as they gererally do not use enough water and the concrete rendering cracks as a result


Very unusual for Thais to not use enough water :roll: but true in this instance.

Those cracks in the rendering sometimes take many months to appear ... as modern paints are flexible ... that causes house owners to be concerned that the foundations are inadequate and settlement is the problem; most times it is simply a delayed reaction to the dry blocks/bricks sucking the water from the render mix and causing poor adhesion. Tap around a crack and if there is a hollow sound then poor render adhesion is the problem.

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Re: oor hoose build in Minburi

Postby saorsa » Sun Aug 19, 2012 1:13 pm

unclezillion wrote:you will either have an electric shower unit or an electric hot water storage tank; what we call an immersion heater in the UK. for this you will either have to have a cupboard or risk using the roof space if you do not want it in the bathroom! I have a large shower head and a bath and use a small white heating unit that fits nicely in the corner of the bathroom. of course all this is avoided if you do not heat the water. :D
I would not take to much notice of Thais saying you must use a certain product as we have been using this type of stuff in the UK for years and plastering them with products not mentioned on the Thai websites. There are products around to stop excessive suction and in the UK we use gyprime ( or something along those lines) or do a scratch coat. which essentially is 3 coats instead of 2. The real trick with these blocks is to give them a good soaking( you will have to watch many Thais on this as they gererally do not use enough water and the concrete rendering cracks as a result) and a scratch coat before application of plaster to avoid cracking.
info on scratch coats http://www.stuccoguru.com/resources/art ... sourceID=5
in one way you are lucky because you have time to plan absolutely everything and know exactly what you want to do as you will probably have to micro manage Thai builders to get exactly what you want.


That depends where you live. I had gas in scotland. In one house I had a bax boiler I think the type was.

There will be no micro-managing as I am due to start a new contract next month and will be working 8/2 rotation in Holland for 1 year and Singapore for the following 2 years. My wife will visit the site regularly and email me lots of pics to keep me updated and on my 2 weeks vacation, I will visit the site regularly, but that is it. I work as a project manager offshore and my way of working is get the right people to do the job and have a clear plan of the sequence of events and you don't need to micro manage, you just need to monitor progress and occasionally make adjustments or react to problems. I 'think' I have the right people in my friend's father to do the build, but I guess time will tell.
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Re: oor hoose build in Minburi

Postby saorsa » Sun Aug 19, 2012 1:16 pm

MGV12 wrote:
unclezillion wrote:you will have to watch many Thais on this as they gererally do not use enough water and the concrete rendering cracks as a result


Very unusual for Thais to not use enough water :roll: but true in this instance.

Those cracks in the rendering sometimes take many months to appear ... as modern paints are flexible ... that causes house owners to be concerned that the foundations are inadequate and settlement is the problem; most times it is simply a delayed reaction to the dry blocks/bricks sucking the water from the render mix and causing poor adhesion. Tap around a crack and if there is a hollow sound then poor render adhesion is the problem.


If you get these cracks, am I correct that a small amount of flexible filler and a lick of paint will stop it coming back, or can it be an ongoing problem? I remember I made the mistake of buying a new built Barratt house in Scotland and the plasterboard nails started to creep out after a couple of months living in the house. The snagging list I had for that place ran to pages. :P
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