Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

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Re: Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

Postby Makmak456 » Mon May 28, 2012 6:54 am

some of the supplies, 8 rolls rebar tie wire, 800 saddles, red concrete,
DSC_0803.jpg
"Conchit" rebar bender machine
err portland cement to make concrete

DSC_0803.jpg
"Conchit" rebar bender machine


"conchit" Arebar bending machine
Attachments
DSC_0928.jpg
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Re: Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

Postby Makmak456 » Mon May 28, 2012 7:00 am

mama wiring
DSC_0964.jpg
typical Issan wire run around a post
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Re: Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

Postby Makmak456 » Mon May 28, 2012 7:08 am

and a big bug !!!
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Re: Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

Postby Makmak456 » Mon May 28, 2012 7:11 am

DSCN4568.jpg
what will be "front" of house
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Re: Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

Postby Makmak456 » Mon May 28, 2012 7:20 am

DSCN4571.jpg
more supplies
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Re: Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

Postby Makmak456 » Mon May 28, 2012 7:22 am

DSCN4573.jpg
river rock and sand for foundation
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Re: Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

Postby sirineou » Mon May 28, 2012 12:07 pm

Hi MakMak
Looks like you made a good start
IMO 100,000 baht to start is not an unreasonable amount. rebar Steel and wood is not cheap.
Also even though pouring the concrete in one shot, yields the best results, depending on what you are pouring, it is not unusual to pour it in sections .of course you don't want to pour
half a column, and a few days later pour the rest, but if you don't have ,or don't want to spend too much money on wood for forms, it is reasonable to pour some of the columns, and next day remove the forms, wrap the columns in plastic to prevent them from drying too fast, and pouring the rest the next day, or in the case of the ground beams pour a section, remove the forms and pure the rest next day, assuming that you don't wait too long between pours, and some sort of key-way is provided between sections to assure the two sections lock to each other.This key-way can be as simple as making sure that the termination of the first pour is not a sharp end or... In the industry what we go is to place a piece of Styrofoam insulation at the end of the form, when the form is removed,it is easy to chip away the styrofoam and provide a key between the two pours.

You are fortunate to have the in laws helping you out, and that you have them near by to protect the material, and to provide basic services, such as water, and electric.
I see that you have the cement aggregate and sand delivered on site, is this for mixing for the structural columns and beams, or for the filling in of block and rendering?
Thais have a tendency to put too much water in the mix, it is easier for them to mix, and pour,or not mixing the appropriated proportions of cement, sand and aggregate. but too much water in the mix makes for a lower curing PSI
and a weaker concrete,same for too much sand or aggregate.
When I was doing my perimeter wall,I tried to explain that to them, but they did nor seem to be getting it, so I started ordering ready-mix , like C-pak, It turned out not to be that more expensive than mixing our own (of course it helped that I lived near the cement plan), and I got a much better result, both in finish and strength, and also helped to speed things up.
Could you post a sketch of what the home will look like in the end? It will make it a Little easier to follow the build and understand what is going on.
Anyway, as I said earlier, looks like you are getting up to a good start, look forward to seeing more of it

Chok Dee
I talk to my self because I am the only one who will listen
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Re: Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

Postby Makmak456 » Mon May 28, 2012 2:40 pm

coming up a hand drawn site plan :)
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Re: Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

Postby Makmak456 » Mon May 28, 2012 4:38 pm

DSCN3975.jpg
It helps when one of your GF brothers is a monk, and they were not using the
concrete mixer at this time
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Re: Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

Postby Makmak456 » Mon May 28, 2012 4:45 pm

DSCN4071.jpg
drawing by builder
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Re: Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

Postby Makmak456 » Mon May 28, 2012 4:46 pm

first floor, very basic
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Re: Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

Postby Makmak456 » Mon May 28, 2012 4:52 pm

DSCN3995.jpg
form work starting under the toilet, back of house
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Re: Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

Postby Makmak456 » Mon May 28, 2012 4:55 pm

This is the point that I was jumping up and down, stop-stop
where in the fracking heck or words to that effect, where is the rest of the
form boards
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Re: Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

Postby Makmak456 » Mon May 28, 2012 5:00 pm

DSCN3905.jpg
rebar and form making crew well 2 of the 4
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Re: Ban Na Khom-Issan-That Pahom

Postby Makmak456 » Mon May 28, 2012 5:11 pm

lots of stuff going on in this pic,
those square concrete "things" are the bases of some under sized (according to my builder) precast 3 M posts. 1 too short, 2 too light of rebar etc....
To me qualifies as "stupid falang tax" :)8700B for 12, but will use around the
farm for something else, so not totally wasted money.
The guy bending over is "Conchit" and the other "Soom" There are 2 ladies too who seem to do all the rebar assembly, and other low skill jobs.
Notice the 10" Makita saw is standing upside down, that is because the blade
guard has been removed. Any of the "Safety" people in OZ or USA would go apesh*t over the way things are done here.
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