Just about to start building and terrified

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Just about to start building and terrified

Postby Takiab » Thu Sep 29, 2005 2:20 pm

Hiya

My wife and I recently bought a 1/2 rai of land in Hua Hin. We have just had plans drawn up which should be passed within the next two to three weeks. The house is 108 square metres and is to built on stilts using a concrete floor. We have had one quote in so far for the concrete and construction work (THB 430,000) The house will have a total of eighteen stilts of which sixteen are the main stilts and two are slightly smaller to support a covering over the front door area.

Please could someone advise if this is a realistic quote or is the contractor taking a chance.

Please help
:oops:
Takiab
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Hua Hin building project

Postby dozer » Thu Sep 29, 2005 3:36 pm

It is a little difficult to comment on the bid amount without really delving into the project a lot more. In any event, that probably isn't necessary if you follow these steps.

1.) Go out and get at least 3 bids for the same work. That way you can compare the pricing.
2.) Make sure to structure the contracts so there is a minimum initial payment, and subsequent payments are made after your approval of each building milestone.
3.) Go check references and look at some of the previous work of the contractor.

I like contracts for 'labor only' as it gives you more control over the material quality and eliminates most incentive for contractor corner cutting on materials. That being said, if you are having it bid labor + materials be sure to specify in the contract each type of material which you want used.
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Postby the limey » Thu Sep 29, 2005 6:00 pm

Got to get three quotes, you would do that in your home country so do that here, if the quote includes the roof then it isnt so bad, if it doesn't include the roof it maybe a tad too high, also at some stage during the wall building you need your cable runs put in unless you don't mind looking at exposed cables.
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bricks and mortar

Postby Somtamthai » Tue Oct 18, 2005 5:26 pm

hey all,to start by saying this site has come as somewhat as a godsend,really has,I am about to buy 1 rai of land in krabi province,Ao nang to be more precise for about 850.000 baht.This I will state is relatively inexpensive considering land prices in the south.I alongside a partner will start to construct 3 houses on this plot varying in size from 1 bedroom to 3 bedroom.Since I have passable Thai skills I will take a pretty much hands on aproach to the project.The chanoute is looking like its in good order but again I would like your opinion on having a Thai lawyer over look it and the dimensions given.Is it completely necesssary and does it make sense in the long run?thanks somtamthai
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Postby the limey » Tue Oct 18, 2005 6:36 pm

if you want the houses to have there own land paper first you need to split the land, for that you need to go down the land office, 3 or 4 thousand per land paper.
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Re: bricks and mortar

Postby dozer » Wed Oct 19, 2005 7:52 am

Somtamthai wrote:The chanoute is looking like its in good order but again I would like your opinion on having a Thai lawyer over look it and the dimensions given.Is it completely necesssary and does it make sense in the long run?thanks somtamthai
As far as the land dimensions, it is a very wise idea to make the land purchase agreement subject to a new land survey. Some land were upgraded to Chanote via aireal survey and aren't very accurate. In any event the land office fee for a resurvey isn't expensive and is well worth it.
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safe practices for hiring contractors

Postby thaimic » Wed Oct 26, 2005 11:08 am

As usual, Dozer's advice is spot on. Getting 3 bids always a good idea; Specify materials, different grades of steel/rebar and cements make a HUGE difference in strength/durability/longevity of the house; price the materials yourself, to see if you'll save money there. (A note on this-a good builder with a buying history with suppliers will get better prices than you can. The builder will mark up materials prices, so negotiate the price down to what you can get for them, or cheaper if you're a good haggler. You don't really want to buy the materials yourself if you don't have to, a time consuming headache.) A payment schedule based on completed steps. I would advise keeping the final payment 25-30% of the total price, good insurance/motivation for the crew to finish the job 100%. Always a good idea to keep your eye on the project as much as you can. Like workers anywhere in the world, they are busier here when the big boss is around.
Good luck, during those difficult moments take deep breaths, and remember- at it's worst here it sure beats living in an expensive, cold, snowy country. :)
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Postby the limey » Wed Oct 26, 2005 1:24 pm

If you can keep the final payment at 25 or 30 percent then you are being overcharged as the normal profit margin is only 20 percent for general house building.
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