Our house project Phitsanulok

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Re: Our house project Phitsanulok

Postby elgato » Wed Feb 22, 2012 9:48 pm

Ians wrote:Here's the bloody odd tile, the colours are not quite right but you can certainly see difference. Everytime I look at the built-in oven where what would have been the last tile to finish the job is now located out of sight but not out of mind on my part, I feel like murdering someone.

elgato, have replied to your PM


Now that you've pointed out the location of the odd tile all visitors will look for it. Got your PM and responded.
I thought I was wrong once but I was mistaken.
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Re: Our house project Phitsanulok

Postby payebacs » Thu Feb 23, 2012 1:16 am

I'm told in Japan when something's as perfect as your tiled floor was to be they make a deliberate mistake so as to remain humble so you could try to view it like that but now I know your not Japanese nor in Japan for that matter so although I see a few people are adapting to the thai custom of having odd numbered stairs I don't suppose that's going to happen is it, and I'm quite a perfectionist myself so I'm guessing the only thing for it is to pull up that tile and lay a fresh one. Or is that not possible.
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Re: Our house project Phitsanulok

Postby geordie » Thu Feb 23, 2012 1:27 am

Ian it hardly notices :roll: :roll: :roll:




But you are right kill the tiler :mrgreen: At least it will not leak or electrocute you and to be honest its the overall apearance that counts you can if you look long and hard find fault with most things
my comments may be wrong but never deliberately
If it aint broke, dont fix it
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Re: Our house project Phitsanulok

Postby Mike Judd » Thu Feb 23, 2012 2:02 pm

You are right, it's not a big drama but you are going to see it for ever. Did you ever bother to ask your Tiler WHY ? he disregarded your instructions to use the 2 pieces under the stove, or was it another of those mis-understandings with the language we all get. ?
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Re: Our house project Phitsanulok

Postby Ians » Thu Feb 23, 2012 2:42 pm

Mike Judd wrote:You are right, it's not a big drama but you are going to see it for ever. Did you ever bother to ask your Tiler WHY ? he disregarded your instructions to use the 2 pieces under the stove, or was it another of those mis-understandings with the language we all get. ?


Normal Thai build, issue instructions or give manufacturer's installation data - all to be ignored and done "my way" irrespective of what language is used or how many times it is given. I will be so happy when the project is complete which is nearly there, the anger fuse is getting shorter everyday - sick of giving instructions, sorting out basic problems that should never arise, guess we have all been thru this at some stage building in Thailand.

Counting down the days, the builder is currently working his way thru' the reject list, which I am happy to say is fairly minor with one exception which is the wiring, from day 1 the instruction was "NO TWISTED AND TAPED WIRE CONNECTION" (I even brought from Aust. heavy duty screwed type connectors for all the power circuits) so after checking a couple of likely places I found dodgy connections - so simply said to the builder "wiring is not acceptable" get it sorted and as Final payment is based on very thing sorted to our satisfaction - the incentive is to now fix everything ASAP.
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Re: Our house project Phitsanulok

Postby Max&Bee-in-CM » Thu Feb 23, 2012 3:04 pm

Dont compromise on wiring - I assume you have 3 wires to ever point (live, neutral, earth).
I recommend a test to make sure every power point is earthed correctly as well.
Make sure your have a proper safety switch and its tested.
For twisting wires together, they have those little screw caps here, all sorts of sizes and colors, those the locals seem to understand how to use, but some 3M tape on top doesnt hurt anyways.
Make sure as well, if you have 3 phase, that the aircon for each room is on a different phase to the lights for that room, otherwise each time you power the AC the lights will flicker in that room.

Stress and annoyance wise, it goes with the territory here - although I must say I fell 257% better now that the 2 DHs I had working are gone, and I am down to just 2 staff, but they work well and honest, and its much more fun and pleasurable every day building now. Keep the relationship with the wife strong and safe, thats the thing that can suffer debilitating damage due to stresses and communication issues. The end is nigh, one way or the other, it is nigh (for me too).
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Re: Our house project Phitsanulok

Postby Ians » Thu Feb 23, 2012 7:50 pm

All power point circuits are RCBO protected with seperate circuits for A/C units, water heaters, fridge, oven and range hood (with RCBO) all with L N & E.

Stress levels reducing each day as completion draws near with only the few fix-ups to be attended to and outside painting to be touced up / finalised.

Built in cupboards, wardrobe and study desks, bookcase etc (our supply) are also nearing completion although dragging the chain a little, but we can function without them be finalised.
So looking forward to sitting back and enjoying a cold beer or two.
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Re: Our house project Phitsanulok

Postby Mike Judd » Fri Feb 24, 2012 2:26 pm

The biggest problem that I have found when dealing with Thais, is this "Not to lose face thing"! so if you ask them anything , directions what ever,they would rather say anything , rather then admit that they don't know. Strange to us who would like a straight truthful answer, but T.I.T.
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Re: Our house project Phitsanulok

Postby Ians » Tue Dec 04, 2012 9:09 pm

Thought it about time I updated the build, we have been in the house now for about 9 months and everything is in the right place and works very well. I can say that we have now finished with exception of a few small items which will come later as money and need increases.
There is an issue with a few leaks on the third level of the roof when we get very heavy continuos rain, I think it is the water cascading from the second roof onto the 3rd level and splashing under the overlaps, the builder is going the right thing although not successful as yet - next move looks to be galvanised steel sheet under the tiles at the 3rd level to ensure any leakage is directed to the edge of the roof overhang, I was prepared to discuss $$ with him but - NO - I built it and I will fix it - todate any issue we have had has been remedied without any problem or complaint and always attended to quickly or at least we are fully informed as to when it will be done. Top marks to the builder, certainly after some of the horror stories you hear about Thai builders.

I intend to post a few more photo's shortly.
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dining room.jpg
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dining room to kitchen.jpg
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Re: Our house project Phitsanulok

Postby weescotsguy66 » Thu Jul 18, 2013 7:02 pm

Well Done, Ian looks really lovely, you seem to have a relatively good builder and did alot of research, I am planning to build a few 2 bedroom houses nearby in Sukhothai.

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Re: Our house project Phitsanulok

Postby pipoz » Sun May 18, 2014 11:42 am

Thanks,

I saw in your post that you used the red brick for most of your external walls. Thinking of doing the same as I have a veranda around the outside and a roof overhang/eave of 1.0 m plus, so walls wont get too wet. Plus I will use a Damp proof Course at the base.

Any idea on what the Red Bricks cost per 1000 or per m2?

Regards

pipoz
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Re: Our house project Phitsanulok

Postby Ians » Sun May 18, 2014 2:41 pm

pipoz:
I didn't use damp course as I didn't consider it necessary, I have verandas all the way round with a minimum of 1.5 metre overhang and 2 metres for most of the house.
As for price, sorry can't help - it was a fixed price contract for the complete house.
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Re: Our house project Phitsanulok

Postby Mike Judd » Sun May 18, 2014 5:32 pm

The red bricks are uses a lot by Tai builders, but why they don't make them in a bigger size is beyond me, they are light enough but as they are you end up with as much cement joints as brick which is just as well the labour is cheap. Chasing out for conduits etc: which we require doesn't leave much wall left either, Thais are used to just running the wiring down the wall with clips. Whatever you use and Q Con etc: seem to be the most popular for insulation, they need a render and a good paint job as a waterproofing, its the joints where the water penetrates a wall, thats why in western builds with any sort of bricks especially face bricks , there is always a cavity between two skins of bricks.
With damp courses, it depends on the slab that the wall sits on, water has a capillary action and can come up from below if the ground gets wet. Thais have generally built up off the ground so there has never been much call for damp courses, therefore there doesnt seem to much call for them here. Where as in the west there are every type from the old fashioned lead /alloy with bitumen coating to what I brought over and used under all my walls inside and out, a black ribbed plastic that is light /cheap and comes in rolls.
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Re: Our house project Phitsanulok

Postby pipoz » Sun May 18, 2014 6:48 pm

Mike Judd wrote:The red bricks are uses a lot by Tai builders, but why they don't make them in a bigger size is beyond me, they are light enough but as they are you end up with as much cement joints as brick which is just as well the labour is cheap. Chasing out for conduits etc: which we require doesn't leave much wall left either, Thais are used to just running the wiring down the wall with clips. Whatever you use and Q Con etc: seem to be the most popular for insulation, they need a render and a good paint job as a waterproofing, its the joints where the water penetrates a wall, thats why in western builds with any sort of bricks especially face bricks , there is always a cavity between two skins of bricks.
With damp courses, it depends on the slab that the wall sits on, water has a capillary action and can come up from below if the ground gets wet. Thais have generally built up off the ground so there has never been much call for damp courses, therefore there doesnt seem to much call for them here. Where as in the west there are every type from the old fashioned lead /alloy with bitumen coating to what I brought over and used under all my walls inside and out, a black ribbed plastic that is light /cheap and comes in rolls.


Thanks Mike, but I intend on building a double skin with a cavity, with the electrical conduit within the cavity. Plus I also wish to profile the facade at the front and a double skin (in some cases triple brick skin at the base) seemed to be easier to do with the smaller bricks than with the larger concrete blocks.

I am also building the foundation ground beams on top of the exiting fill/ground with sand infill in between the ground beams. I expect the sand dry out and settle a bit after I have pour the ground slab, thus leaving a small void under the slab, so not much risk of dampness coming up through the slab.

Am considering some bitumen based waterproofing where the house slabs sits on top of/overlaps with the externall Verandah pavement slab.

A few perimeter Agi drains around the house will also track the water away from the foundation areas

Regards

Phil
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Re: Our house project Phitsanulok

Postby Marlon » Sun Jul 06, 2014 3:58 am

pipoz wrote:Thanks,

I saw in your post that you used the red brick for most of your external walls. Thinking of doing the same as I have a veranda around the outside and a roof overhang/eave of 1.0 m plus, so walls wont get too wet. Plus I will use a Damp proof Course at the base.

Any idea on what the Red Bricks cost per 1000 or per m2?

Regards

pipoz


pipoz, I just bought 500 of the buggers at our village supplier, at .95 baht each. So 500 cost 495 baht. The advantage is that they can be laid at any angle to take up any gap. We have used them on top of the wall blocks, and for the kitchen.
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