My building story - Chiang Mai

Any story related to building in the LOS, whether everything turned out hunky dory or not!

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Re: My building story - Chiang Mai

Postby kevh » Sun Mar 29, 2009 5:17 pm

The soil will be put up to the top block all around the house.

Kevh
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Re: My building story - Chiang Mai

Postby kevh » Wed Apr 01, 2009 10:34 am

Has anyone in the Chiang Mai area had 3 phase electricity connected recently. I have been reading some posts, saying between 10,000 and 18,000 for the meter. Can anyone clarify this??
Can anyone give me some contact numbers to fill the land ??

kevh111
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Re: My building story - Chiang Mai

Postby Burkie » Wed Apr 01, 2009 12:29 pm

Good day Kevh. I live in SanKamphaeng district and I was quoted 16,100 baht for 3 phase hook-up. What part of Chiang Mai are you building? I could only give you fill prices from this area where I live. Good luck with the building. "Burkie"
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Re: My building story - Chiang Mai

Postby chiangmaiexpat » Thu Apr 02, 2009 8:30 am

kevh wrote:Has anyone in the Chiang Mai area had 3 phase electricity connected recently. I have been reading some posts, saying between 10,000 and 18,000 for the meter. Can anyone clarify this??


Yes, we did. I found it rather confusing until I got a leaflet from EGAT that describes the available options with prices. You should ask them for that. Initially, I did not see any reason why one would install a 3 phase connection for residential use, unless one wants to run special machinery in a workshop or something like that. The answer to this question is that EGAT limits the max amperage on each phase, or rather offers different amperage options at various prices. If you use three phases you can distribute each phase to different circuits to balance the amperage, so effectively you get three single phases. The cost for the connection was roughly 16,000 THB including the meter in our case. We also put up an electricity pole on our property at 3,000 THB. Our land is in Nongjom, not very far from San Pee Sua.

Cheers, CMX
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Re: My building story - Chiang Mai

Postby kevh » Thu Apr 02, 2009 9:38 am

Burkie & CMX

Thanks for the information, did they run your cables overhead or did you have them run under the ground to your distribution board??
The reason for the 3 phases is simply down to the amount of aircon and a swimming pool possibly at a later date.

kevh
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Re: My building story - Chiang Mai

Postby Burkie » Thu Apr 02, 2009 11:31 am

Good morning Kevh... When I built my house I put in underground cables as I did not want any lines which sometimes can be very ugly. At present I do not have any a/c units. I planned for the future. I also don't have a swimming pool and will not bother with one. I do plan on putting a complete irrigation system soon and 3 phase pumps are cheaper and run with much less effort. Hope this will help you in some way. Any further questions will always be welcomed.

"Burkie"
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Re: My building story - Chiang Mai

Postby chiangmaiexpat » Thu Apr 02, 2009 2:22 pm

kevh wrote:Thanks for the information, did they run your cables overhead or did you have them run under the ground to your distribution board??
The reason for the 3 phases is simply down to the amount of aircon and a swimming pool possibly at a later date.


From the pole that we set up at the border of our plot, the cables run underground to the consumer unit. The electrician who installed the wiring in our house was responsible for that. Later it turned out that he forgot the door bell :roll: but that's another story. It's up to you how to do it. Underground usually looks better. If you add up the power consumers you are likely to have in the future and calculate the max load, you get the required amperage A = max energy consumption / 220 V.

Cheers, CMX
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Re: My building story - Chiang Mai

Postby thaifly » Fri Apr 03, 2009 10:34 am

kevh wrote:Can anyone give me some contact numbers to fill the land ?
gidday kevh...its the thai fly from mae rim...hey matey..you will have to chase someone up local..out our way...the prices are up and down like a fiddlers elbow.... approx...350 to 400 baht ..for reasonably good quality soil..that is for 5 cubic metres..or a 6 wheeler truck filled to the brim...keep a very good eye on their load capacity..some can be a shifty lot... ITS A SOIL OF A GIDDAY TO ALL...its the thaifly from mae rim
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Re: My building story - Chiang Mai

Postby kevh » Thu Apr 09, 2009 2:36 pm

Thanks for the advice with regards to the 3 phase connection. I'm going to run the cables underground, looks far better. There are 2 old wooden electricity poles running down the outside perimeter wall, these are in really bad shape, will have to go to the local goverment office and see if these can be replaced for the concrete poles..wonder how much luck we'll have there!!
The builders are making good progress, all vertical supports are up for the ground level, all concrete is down for the ground level, soil top up is complete. Work has started on the first floor horizontal support beams.
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Piping for the pests
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Making the forms up for the vertical supports
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All the vertical supports for the ground level are complete
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Frame for the stairs being fabricated
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Land being filled up, between 1.2 - 0.6 meters
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The wall to the front has been left at halfway for metal work to be fabricated at a later date
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Another view from the front of the property
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Re: My building story - Chiang Mai

Postby kevh » Wed May 13, 2009 11:34 am

It's been a while, but here is an update of the progress.

kevh
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Supports for the horizontal concrete beams
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Car port concrete base
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Car port
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Supports for concrete floor
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First floor plumbing
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Re: My building story - Chiang Mai

Postby kevh » Wed May 13, 2009 11:46 am

A
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Health & Safety!
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Base for the steel work
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Re: My building story - Chiang Mai

Postby kevh » Wed May 13, 2009 12:03 pm

This is where we are up to today...
The tiles have been ordered a week ago and have a 6 week delivery!
Now have the task of picking the sanitary items, kitchen etc...
I saw a kitchen we liked in Homepro, had my eye on it for months. It was around 290,000 and now its shot up to 500,000!! Our builder knows someone who can replicate the kitchen, we have asked to have a look at some of his jobs.
Does anyone who lives in Chiang Mai area know of anyone or any recommendations??

kevh
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Re: My building story - Chiang Mai

Postby DrDave » Thu May 14, 2009 9:14 pm

Hi kevh - looks like the house is progressing well. A nice design, and should be beautiful when finished.

When looking at the photos of the 1st floor plumbing, I can't be sure, but it looks like there might not be any "u bends" or traps installed for your waste lines. In my opinion, these are important for the floor drains and shower pans, as without them, there's a chance that sewer gas can seep up into the living area of your home. For some reason, Thai builders don't normally install these - you have to specify them.

Just a suggestion that you have your builder replace the 90 degree ells with a u-bend/trap for each of the shower and floor drains before the ground floor sheetrock ceiling goes up. Theoretically, you don't need a u-bend for a floor drain, as the floor drain trim contains a sort of "anti-stink" seal, but from my experience, they don't work very well. A few hundred baht spent now on u-bends could save you thousands later (not to mention the mess of tearing out sections of the ceiling to install them later).
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Re: My building story - Chiang Mai

Postby kevh » Sat May 16, 2009 4:32 pm

DrDave

Good spot... They hadn't put the "U" bends in for the shower and floor drains.
Something that simple could of caused me alot of hassle later.
Thanks

kevh
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Re: My building story - Chiang Mai

Postby Rick B » Sun May 17, 2009 11:52 am

Kevh, while you're talking to the builder about the floor drain traps, I suggest you also check the slope on the 4" waste piping. In the picture captioned first floor floor plumbing, as well as other pictures showing the large pipe, it shows your waste piping being run a long distance horizontally under the second floor. If these pipes are not properly sloped, you are likely to have solid waste (i.e., sh*t) buildup in the pipes and stop up the toilets. I personally recommend a slope of 1cm in 50 cms for the large pipe runs that will contain solid waste. I also recommend a drop in elevation on every other elbow. This gives the waste sufficient energy to move easily through the pipe until it reaches the septic tank. While I fully agree with Dr. Dave's recommendations, you probably won't have any bad smell coming into the bathroom without U-bends or P-traps, IF your grey water is separated from your toilet waste and goes to a different tank or hole in the ground. It's the septic waste tank that has the worse odor, not the grey water tank. But, to be fully safe, I agree that it is best to have traps in the grey water waste lines. Also, make sure the waste and drain lines are properly vented, especially with the installation of the U-bends. Without proper ventilation, the water in the U-bend traps that helps keep the odors away, will be siphoned off quickly. Water won't flow properly without a place for the air in the pipes to go as water replaces the air.
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