Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Any story related to building in the LOS, whether everything turned out hunky dory or not!

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Re: Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Postby gadgetman » Sun Jan 17, 2010 8:36 pm

We finished assembling the steel shuttering for the ground beam, and ordered the 240 steng CPAC readymix for the 120m run of beam, which we were planning to pour and finish in half a day, to make a good strong job. The weather up until then had been dry, but just as the first of the 2 truckloads arrived, the rain started to fall, and the workers organised a chain gang to move cement from truck to beam as quickly as possible
Chain gang moving the ready mix.jpg
CPAC trucks arrive with concrete for beam

Despite the rain and a CPAC truck getting stuck in the mud up to its axles on site, we finished the beam as planned and had it covered up as we went to protect it from the rain as much as possible.
CPAC truck stuck in mud!.jpg
CPAC truck well and truly stuck onsite!

We left it for 2 days, then removed the inner shuttering and filled inside the beam with sand, using a vibrator to compact it, before laying the 3.8mm steel mesh and pouring the 10cm thick ground slab from 240 steng CPAC readymix concrete
beam finished, filling with sand before pouring ground slab.jpg
Beam finished and innner shuttering removed for sand fill

The concrete groundslab was duly poured with 240steng readymix using 14m3 to finish the job, and after it had cured, we fitted on the 1.1m long lengths of 8" concrete pipe to make the column supports that would support the main house beam. The house main floor was planned to be 1.6m above the ground level, so when we constructed the pool which was to be built above ground, the depth of the pool would finish up at 1.3m, and the water level 8cm below the top of the tiled level of the surrounding house terrace. It will become clear later!
Ground slab finished and concrete pillars go on to support first floor beam.jpg
Ground slab poured and posts go on for main floor beam

After we had fitted all 24 concrete pipes and filled them with concrete, we made up all the rebar in 12mm and 16mm sizes as dictated by the various beam loadings, some beams having as many as 9 lengths of rebar inside their structure, and constructed the wood supports that would hold the steel shuttering that would form the 40cm x 20cm floor beam later. The total length of the beam is 155m, so it was a lot of wood and construction for the supports alone, and of course 310m of shuttering, so the cost of hiring the steel in handy 1.2m lengths, 40cm high was far less costly than buying all the extra timber we would have required to make our own shuttering-and it saved a lot of time and produced a much more consistent job to boot!
Building the wood supports to hold steel ready for first floor beam.jpg
House floor beam steelwork and wood shuttering supports under construction
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Re: Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Postby gadgetman » Sun Jan 17, 2010 8:59 pm

iIt was a big job, but after a week or so work, we had completed all the floor beam support structure, manufactured all the rebar steelwork and had the 310m of steel shuttering delivered, which we duly lifted into position on top of the supports and secured into position ready for the 13m3 of CPAC 240steng readymix which we were using to cast the beam, again planning to do it in one continuos pour over one day for maximum strength.
beam ready for concrete pour.jpg
Main floor beam shuttering complete and ready for concrete pour

The CPAC arrived on schedule the following day, and with dry weather we had a trouble free pour and a lot of tired workers who had shifted and poured the 13m3 of readymix into the 155m long beam, 1.5m above ground level. We left the shuttering on for 3 days to ensure the concrete was cured sufficiently slowly befor removing it and were relieved to see a nicely finished beam casting.
Steel shuttering removed from 155m of finished beam poured in one go.jpg
Main floor beam completed and shuttering removed
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Re: Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Postby BKKBILL » Mon Jan 18, 2010 10:16 am

Gadgetman thanks for posting the building story you have some very good ideas. I do like the one pour and steel forms. As you say it should make for a much stronger rim beam.
Good luck with your business sounds like a good plan. I am looking forward to the rest. My wife and I will have to make a trip out that way in the not to distant future.
It's not who you know, it's whom you know.
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Re: Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Postby gadgetman » Mon Jan 18, 2010 10:22 am

As soon as we had the shuttering removed from the floor beam, we had the concrete floor planks delivered with the crane to lower them into position. We were leaving out the floor area over the 3 adjacent bathrooms, as these were going to have a cast concrete floor slab 10cm thick and 10cm lower than the finished house floor, and also we temporarily left out a 4mx4m section at the end of the terrace as we had to construct the 14000ltr water storage tank which was to be built under the main house floor on top of the concrete ground slab, and cast from concrete like a mini swimming pool. After it was completed we would lower the final concrete planks into place by hand, completing the main floor.
4m long precast concrete floor planks lowered in place.jpg
Lowering the precastconcrete floor planks into place

With the floor planks in position, construction began on the water tank. The outside form work was concrete blocks laid up from the groundslab up to the floor beam, and all linked with 6mm steel and backfilled with cement for strength as these were going to hold back the 20cm think concrete walls we would pour later after laying in the 12mm rebar reinforcement, waterstop rubber seal around the base perimeter and pouring the 15cm thick tank concrete base.
Constructing the underfloor water storeage tank 14000litres.jpg
Construction underway on the underfloor water tank

After all the 12mm rebar was fitted into place and the 8" rubber waterstop seal wired in around the bottom perimeter of the rebar cage, we poured the 15cm tank base which we mixed on site from a strong concrete mix similar to 280steng CPAC, and we added Sika waterproofing liquid additive to the mix to ensude waterproofness of the finished job. With the base completed and dried, we formed the walls inside the blockwork outer form by using steel shuttering, to enable us to cast the 20cm thick tank walls. 4" of the 8" waterstop seal remained exposed above the tank base, inside the shuttering, so when the wall was poured, it would make the watertight seal between base and wall, exactly the same tecnique as we would use for the swimming pool construction later.
Steel shuttering goes into water tank so can pour concrete sides.jpg
Steel shuttering fitted in place into water tank

With the shuttering in place and lots of wood bracing to ensure it didn't move under the weight of the concrete pour, we again mixed on site the waterproofed concrete, and poured the 20cm thick walls of the tank, using a vibrator sparingly to ensure there were no voids in the concrete. I say sparingly, because over use of the vibrator can cause either the gravel to all sink to the bottom of the mix in the casting, and also the vibration and movement in the mix causes severe loading on the shuttering and formwork and can cause bowing, or if you have weak shuttering , it can burst. I have experienced this on a previous project, so beware over vibrating! The shuttering was later removed after leaving the concrete 3 days to reasonably cure and we were pleased to see a good casting with no voids.
Steel shuttering comes off finished water tank walls.jpg
Steel shuttering removed from finished water tank

Following completion of the water tank, the remainder of the floor planks were laid in place, and 3.8mm steel mesh cut and laid over the planks ready for the 10cm thick concrete floor slab to be poured, just leaving the bathroom slab for later construction
Puy 4 months pregnant makes cement spacers to support steel formwork.jpg
Puy 4 months pregnant makes cement spacers to hold up mesh for floor slab
Readymix arrives for floor pour.jpg
Floor with steel mesh in place ready for CPAC 240steng pour
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Pouring the ready mix floor.jpg
Pouring the CPAC 240steng for 10cm thick floor slab
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Re: Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Postby gadgetman » Mon Jan 18, 2010 10:41 am

In the previous series of photos, I was talking about the construction of the watertank, and I omitted this photo showing the completed 12mm rebar steelwork and the rubber waterstop seal wired into position, ready for the concrete base pour. It sort of clarifies the previous explanation, I think! Also the water tank will be fed by both water pumped directly by a centifugal 2hp pump from the reservoir opposite our house through a 2" pipe, via 2 PURE filters and into the tank. In addition, we had fitted 2 x 3" pvc feed pipes that would bring rainwater from later guttering into the tank from the front and back of the house, there were 2 x 3" pvc pipes fitted in as overflows and finally a 2" pvc pipe at the bottom of the tank as a drain, that would later feed into a 4" pvc pipe carrying excess rainwater into the rice paddies behind our house (with the landowners permission of course!)
under floor water tank with rubber waterstop seal ready for base concrete pour.jpg
Tank ready for concrete base pour
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Re: Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Postby gadgetman » Mon Jan 18, 2010 11:26 am

With the main floor slab completed and cured, work began on fitting the 24 x 4m long 8"dia concrete pipes over the 12mm rebar reinforcement, ready for concrete backfilling. We had chosen to make the house with very high ceilings to aid the cooling effect at normal sitting level, hence the 4m long pipes. We also elected to use the 8" pipe forms, rather than cast 20cmx20cm square posts, because I prefer the appearance and also at 320baht for 4 metres, they are cheaper than buying the timber to make the form, and you get a much better finish, quicker construction and with less hassle to boot!
4m long concrete pipes fitted for later concrete pour.jpg
4m long concrete pipes for columns fitted into place

ith all 24 columns concreted in place, we were ready to begin construction of the steel roof beams and trusses. We had costed out a saving of around 150,000 Baht principally on steel savings by roofing the house in much lighter weight Chang/CPAC roofing sheets, rather than use CPAC concrete roofing tiles. They are also as a side benefit more energy efficient as they transmit less solar energy than concrete tiles, and there would be further small savings when we consructed the garage, Sauna Restaraunt kitchen and customer toilet and shower blocks using the same matching materials. If we had been building the house in Phuket or Pattaya, it would have had to be Tiles, as it makes the house much easy to resell to a "farang" buyer, but as we were building in a small village in Korat and we never plan on selling the house anyway, it is inconsequential!
I also liked the CPAC dry fitting system, which meant virtually concealed, colour matched fitting clips to secure the roof panels in place, requiring no ugly fixings drilled through the panels, also their dry ridge tile fixings, meaning no ugly cement to fix ridge tiles in place either, making for a neat job and easy replacement for any future problems, so change roofing it was with Puy choosing her favourite blue colour!
Ready for the steel roof trusses.jpg
24 columns concreted in place ready for roof steel construction
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Re: Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Postby gadgetman » Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:05 pm

With the roof trusses under construction, and progressing well, 4,500 concrete blocks were delivered on site and our builders began building up the non structural house walls.
4500 blocks to be laid.jpg
Roof steel underway and blockwork started. Water tank exterior blockwork visible in left side of house


Now I could also get to workk and begin my favourite job, which was to install all the Thai Pipe PVC water and waste pipes for the entire house. I wanted to ensure the house was plumbed to my (western!) standards, so I had already planned the layout for the entire house and was to undertake the entire installation myself. Thai builders in my experience are not the best plumbers in the world, and I knew exactly what I wanted.
Plumbing the bathrooms under the floor-I love pvc pipework!.jpg
At work on the bathroom plumbing

I had also decided to install all the toilets, sinks, taps, showers, instant water heaters and drains inside the house, and oversee the installation of the 3 house soakaways and 1600ltr septic tank to my specification, because I wanted them done exactly as I like - I am very fussy about plumbing matters! In addition I have seen many leaks in pipework carried out by thai builders as they usually do not roughen up the ends of the pipe and inside the fittings before gluing, and also use very cheap adhesive and too little of it when joining up. I only used the thickest section Chang branded blue PVC pipe and fittings throughout, and their "Tiger" brand PVC adhesive, because while it is more expensive than other makes like Thai Pipe, it is much better quality, and the overall cost increase is pretty insignificant against the whole build cost.
Home made pvc P traps with drain point used for all sinks for ease of servicing.jpg
Underfoor P traps with service drain for all house sinks made from PVC pipe. Far superior to more expensive shop bought items that fit directly under sink.
Water and waste pipework for bathrooms, pipe nearest is anti-syphon vent for shower and toilet waste pipes.jpg
Water and waste PVC pipework. The 4" pipe at the head of the bathroom system in the foreground, is the anti syphon pipe for both shower, sink and toilet waste. It allows air to be drawn into the system as waste water flows down the pipes, preventing syphoning of the water in P traps, shower floor drain fittings and toilet U bends which can otherwise occur, leading to smelly bathrooms, kitchens etc! The anti syphon header pipe is a push fit onto the system, so incase of a blockage in the 4" toilet waste line, or 3" waste water line, we can easily remove it for direct service access.

As the water tank was completed and plastered on the outside, I was also able to install the 2HP centrifugal pump that pumps water via our own 2" pipeline that goes directly to the village reservoir in front of our house. The water passes through a Pure twin filter system with backflush before entering the water tank. The water is for washing only, so the filtration is more than adequate as the last filter in line is 5 microns, leaving the water quite clear when it comes out of the house taps. In addition, there is a Mitsubishi constant pressure on demand water pump that pumps the filtered water from the tank into the house system, garden taps and supply for the restaraunt and sauna to be added later
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Re: Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Postby gadgetman » Wed Jan 20, 2010 11:08 am

thaifly wrote:
gadgetman wrote: I would be delighted to assist any other farang builders or potential builders up here in the NE of Thailand.

its a gidday to the gadgetman...its the thaifly from mae rim..hey cobber..as for the above quote ..FOR NICKS :?: :?: or. EXHORBINANT WESTERN CONSULTANT FEES..the fly would suspect the latter....as for the build sorry to say :D :D :D ..your decision to put a el cheapo roof.up ...with a ghastly .BLUE..colour...IMO .has absoulately ruined the nice design and appearance ..of your bungalow.. surely does not blend in..it sticks ..out.. like dogs balls
...its a ... go go go chelsea f.c . gidday to all...ITS THE THAIFLY FROM MAE RIM


You are far too cynical, my friend!

One thing I have learned living up here in the delightful NE is that there are not too many other "farangs" carrying out any sort of building project, certainly not that I have come across in my travels around our local villages, so it would be great the hear from any others who are in the process of building, thinking of building or who just want to have a chat! Any help or advice I can offer is freely offered and given, for what it may be worth, but it might just save you a bit of heartache or research time. Of course if you were asking me to build you a replica or similar up here, that is a different matter and of course it won't be for free!


Incidentally, if any one is interested, I spent a lot of time developing a spreadsheet to calculate a building project cost. It is not complicated to use and take it for what it is, but if you would like a copy (Free, thaifly!) let me know.

As to the roof, we are not in Phuket or Pattaya so far from sticking out, it blends in beautifully with all the other thai houses in our little village, my wife loves the colour despite being an MU fan (aren't they nearly all MU or Liverpool, strange isn't it) and as I now spend most of my free time in the pool or on the terrace either entertaining new baby daughter and looking out enjoying the view while sipping a cold brew, and not in the garden studying the roof and worrying about the roof and its colour, the aesthetics are irrelevant. And the cost savings paid for the construction of the sauna, restaraunt kithen and toilet and shower blocks. R.I.P!

Incidentally, the sauna works brilliantly, my wife adds different herbs to the steam boiler, depending on what customers needs are (she a bit of a "herbologist" or whatever the right expression is!), although next time I pass a pharmacy I mean to pick up some of the oil you previously suggested and will try adding a ill let you know

Great to receive your "coloured" comments as ever. Life would be SO boring if we all had the same ideas!
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Re: Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Postby Super8man » Sat Jan 23, 2010 3:26 am

gadgetman wrote:As to the roof, we are not in Phuket or Pattaya so far from sticking out, it blends in beautifully with all the other thai houses in our little village, my wife loves the colour despite being an MU fan (aren't they nearly all MU or Liverpool, strange isn't it) and as I now spend most of my free time in the pool or on the terrace either entertaining new baby daughter and looking out enjoying the view while sipping a cold brew, and not in the garden studying the roof and worrying about the roof and its colour

SIGHING A VERY BIG SIGH Looks like we will be just coming for the summer school holidays this time we were hoping to be there now. Tik's sisters house was built using blue tiles and the outdoor area cooking etc with sheets again in blue. She says when we start building as long as the inside is nice that's OK, but I want to take it slowly. We'll look you up when we get over. Looks like tonight its a DVD and a couple of ciders too cold outside.
Best Wishes


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Re: Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Postby geordie » Sat Jan 23, 2010 3:42 am

gadgetman i like the round colums i used a couple of pipes the same on my build the main problem was how to get them over the rebar we had a bar steward of a job doing it
my colums were stand alone (no blockwork) but if i am understanding it corectly you have blocked between yours how did you tie in the blockwork
next query where do you get the rubber you used to seal the floor and walls together on your tank and was it expensive
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Re: Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Postby gadgetman » Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:37 am

geordie wrote:gadgetman i like the round colums i used a couple of pipes the same on my build the main problem was how to get them over the rebar we had a bar steward of a job doing it
my colums were stand alone (no blockwork) but if i am understanding it corectly you have blocked between yours how did you tie in the blockwork
next query where do you get the rubber you used to seal the floor and walls together on your tank and was it expensive


Hi Geordie,

Good to hear from you!

We just had a couple of the builders bend the rebar inner re-inforcement down (We used 6 runs of 12mm bar ties with 6mm steel every 20cm) and two other builders standing a couple of metres up on a scaffold tower who slid the 4m log pipe over the steel down to the floor, assisted on the last part by the two who initially bent the rebar down. It works a treat done like that.

The rubber waterstop seal as we used is available on 20m reels in 6" and 8" widths, although most suppliers will cut it to your lenght if you do not require so much. We used 60 metres to complete our tank and swimming pool. In Phuket it is available in many good hardware stores, and when we were building our tank and pool, I looked everywhere in Korat but couldn't find it, so ordered it from a hardware shop in Phuket, who arranged for it to be shipped directly to us from the manufacturer in Bangkok. We subsequently found it recently on sale at DO Home, our Korat DIY superstore, and they now stock it, and we thenalso found it in a hardware store in Korat, and also a small swimming pool supply shop in Korat as well.

The cost is around 200Baht per metre, but it is essential you use it if you do not want your tank or especially swimming pool to leak where the wall concrete casting joins the already dried floor concrete base. I have attached another photo showing the 8" seal wired onto the pool rebar, ready for the 20cm thick concrete main base pour. Half of the seal will remain exposed ready to join into the walls to be poured after shuttering up later

Hope this helps a little!
Attachments
Pool rebar all finished with rubber waterstop seal fitted and ready for concrete base pour.jpg
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Re: Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Postby gadgetman » Sun Jan 24, 2010 2:40 pm

Super8man wrote:
gadgetman wrote:As to the roof, we are not in Phuket or Pattaya so far from sticking out, it blends in beautifully with all the other thai houses in our little village, my wife loves the colour despite being an MU fan (aren't they nearly all MU or Liverpool, strange isn't it) and as I now spend most of my free time in the pool or on the terrace either entertaining new baby daughter and looking out enjoying the view while sipping a cold brew, and not in the garden studying the roof and worrying about the roof and its colour

SIGHING A VERY BIG SIGH Looks like we will be just coming for the summer school holidays this time we were hoping to be there now. Tik's sisters house was built using blue tiles and the outdoor area cooking etc with sheets again in blue. She says when we start building as long as the inside is nice that's OK, but I want to take it slowly. We'll look you up when we get over. Looks like tonight its a DVD and a couple of ciders too cold outside.


Hi David,

Sorry to hear your plans have changed and you are having to endure the cold UK for a little longer!

I think you are quite right about taking it slowly when it comes to planing your new house. I spent a good 12 months here in Phuket planning the house we have built here in Korat. I played around with lots of ideas, and my graphpaper drawing book was full of sketches and drawings. In fact even after we had an architect draw the final plans, I suddenly had a brainwave looking at the floor plan and changed the arrangement of the bedrooms to give us a seperate study/nursery between the master bedroom and our enlarged en-suite bathroom, by removing the study area of the second bedroom, and moving the postion of some internal walls. The architect liked my new idea, and redrew the plans FOC! We also added the small balcony for our master bedroom which was an idea I had during construction, but didn't need new plans for that, I just drew it onto the plan and instructed the builders on how to modify the planned ring beam and build it!

Back in Korat, we have had cooler and rainy weather for the last few days here, mind you it's still 28c, so don't feel too sorry for us! I used to have some friends who lived in Oughtibridge - have a feeling not too far from your UK address? Have lost touch with them over the last few years, but used to enjoy my weekends up there from Berkshire where I was living at the time. However, very nice countryside around you if memory serves me right - only the cold weather to let it down a bit.

Keep in contact and look forward to seeing you later in the year,

Regards, John and Puy
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Re: Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Postby geordie » Sun Jan 24, 2010 5:20 pm

thanks for the insight gadgetman
gadgetman wrote:Hi Geordie,

Good to hear from you!

We just had a couple of the builders bend the rebar inner re-inforcement down (We used 6 runs of 12mm bar ties with 6mm steel every 20cm) and two other builders standing a couple of metres up on a scaffold tower who slid the 4m log pipe over the steel down to the floor, assisted on the last part by the two who initially bent the rebar down. It works a treat done like that.

!


sounds pretty mutch what we did but without a tower and it looked hard work although i liked the apearance better than square

The waterstop is interesting 1st time seen it detailed on the forum but used it here(UK)on a cellar project pleased to find its available there mind you its just the way of life you go special order because its not available then find it everywhere
the overall build looks good and functional but where you have storage i will have cellar/coolroom built on the same spec as a pool but keeping the water out with earth banked up and maybe some high level windows it should end up almost soundproof as well as cool
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Re: Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Postby jazzman » Mon Jan 25, 2010 1:56 pm

Looks to me as if you only have one layer of rebar on the floor. But it may be the photo. How many ground beams did you put in?
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Re: Building a new home with pool and sauna in Phonjalong, Korat

Postby jaytee » Mon Feb 08, 2010 10:59 am

jazzman wrote:Looks to me as if you only have one layer of rebar on the floor. But it may be the photo. How many ground beams did you put in?

hello mister gadgetman thanks for your pictures and story :D as at one stage or another but at a later date due to the pound being undervalued :( a swimming pool will be in my plans my research on cth has been very fruitful :D your pic only shows one layer of rebar..is that the norm :?: many thanks in advance :D
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