Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

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Re: Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

Postby Super8man » Mon May 24, 2010 3:16 am

Image
Could give a rough idea of how much water they can hold and cost? They look to be 1M rings? We were thinking of doing the same and also using some for house water. Your garden looks great which brings another question. Are the trees planted that size
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Re: Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

Postby jazzman » Mon May 24, 2010 11:32 am

The diameter of most concrete rings is 80cm and the depth is 40 cm although in the picture might be bigger, so it's easy to calculate the volume required. These concrete rings are an ideal way to build septic tanks. They can be problematic when used for above ground water as they are not made of waterproof concrete and are not reinforced.
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Re: Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

Postby apetley » Mon May 24, 2010 4:01 pm

Hi superman, thanks for the interest.
The rings are indeed 1m across and 40 cm deep.
One ring is about 300 litres so four gives approx 1200 litres.
As you can see we have four tanks so nearly 5000 litres which is adequate for our sprinklers......just.
If I were making it again I would go for more capacity.
The rings themselves cost 90 bht each, bargain.
Making it was simple enough and gave me something to do to be honest. Only help I needed was hoisting the top ring into place weakling that I am!
As jazzman says the concrete rings can leak as ours did slightly when first made but the inside has been coated with bitumen paint.
Now they do not leak at all. I have a theory that the local village water is dirty enough to stop the concrete being porous!

Yes trees were all planted as 'adults'.
It seemed that the bigger they are the less likely they are to die.
A couple of our smaller ones didn't like the transplant and died off.
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Re: Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

Postby Super8man » Fri May 28, 2010 2:52 am

apetley wrote:The rings are indeed 1m across and 40 cm deep.
One ring is about 300 litres so four gives approx 1200 litres.
As you can see we have four tanks so nearly 5000 litres which is adequate for our sprinklers......just.
If I were making it again I would go for more capacity.
The rings themselves cost 90 bht each, bargain.
Making it was simple enough and gave me something to do to be honest. Only help I needed was hoisting the top ring into place weakling that I am!
As jazzman says the concrete rings can leak as ours did slightly when first made but the inside has been coated with bitumen paint.
Now they do not leak at all. I have a theory that the local village water is dirty enough to stop the concrete being porous!

Yes trees were all planted as 'adults'.
It seemed that the bigger they are the less likely they are to die.
A couple of our smaller ones didn't like the transplant and died off.


I noticed when we visit the in-laws that the water from well is not 100% clean it does leave a stain. I think we'll go for the rings 90bht about £1 each. Use them for both as Jazzman says "These concrete rings are an ideal way to build septic tanks" and use them for maybe rain water too. I wonder how they weather when painted?

I wondered about using them to help level the garden a little by burying them on concrete raft! and them covering with concrete top and grassing over. Using them to make a solid wall round the garden

We want orange/lemon/lime trees planted more ME I suppose want to look nice but also be productive. Loved holiday one year going back to room passed lemon tree always got one for whiskey or whatever nightcap.
Thanks Jazzman and Apetley for reply
Best Wishes


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Re: Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

Postby apetley » Sat May 29, 2010 9:20 am

Hi Superman.
We have two water supplies.
The village water is used only in the garden as frankly that's all it is good for.
Even in the dry season we only use 500 bht a month of water. The cost of a well locally is at least 50k bht which would buy alot of village water.
In house we have water piped from the local town, 'Municipal supply' as wifey calls it. It's supposed to be fit for drinking and the mayor went as far as installing a drinking fountain and having a big tasting ceremony to show off how pure it is now but I'll pass and carry on drinking out of a bottle thanks.

One of our local building suppliers built a retaining wall by filling in alot of concrete rings with soil. They have been in place a few years now and seem to be holding up well so maybe a cheap way of doing it.

Funny you should mention planting lemon trees in some concrete rings as Nicky was talking about doing this only a few days ago. The single one we have planted in our garden seems not to like our soil and we have been advised to go with planting in a ring as they like drier conditions apparently.
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Re: Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

Postby mikecwm » Thu Sep 09, 2010 5:59 am

Hi apetley.

Just finished reading your engrossing story. Many thanks for all the answers to questions I didn't even know I had (we won't start building for 4 years yet, but have the land bought ready - 30rai in Petchabun province).
One question no one else seems to have asked:-
You have plenty of land to not need to build 2 stories. Was that for the view you would get from your second floor balcony?
Or did cost come into the decision as well - perhaps a smaller roof area being much cheaper?
Anyway - many thanks and I hope you and wifey are enjoying the fruits of your labour.
Just keep us informed if/when you build the pool. (That's last thing on my list as well).
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Re: Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

Postby apetley » Sat Sep 11, 2010 12:45 pm

Hi Mike, thanks very much for the nice comments.
Whilst it's true that a two story house can be cheaper than a single, cost wasn't part of the deal.
I am not a fan of bungalows to be honest and much prefer going upstairs to bed! The view from the balcony is an added bonus too.
Still no pool and at 47 bht to the pound is not likely to be along soon. I consider myself very lucky to have built our home at an average of 70 bht to the pound so you can see how much more the exchange rate would have added to the cost.
Having said that we have had uncle and wifeys cousin around recently to discuss building a proper Thai kitchen and the idea of an above ground pool came up. Cousin has suggested a large concrete above ground pool could be built reasonably cheaply so that may be an option to consider.
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Re: Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

Postby ivanlaw » Fri Oct 15, 2010 3:04 am

What a fantastic house
Your garden design & external wall / rails set it off beautifully.

Ours will be much smaller but I hope, nearly as good looking.

Thanks for all the time it has taken you to post,
I have enjoyed reading & learned at the same time.

Good luck to you both
&
Enjoy your home

Ivan

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Re: Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

Postby apetley » Sun Oct 17, 2010 10:22 am

Hi Ivan thanks for the nice words and good luck with your own build.
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Re: Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

Postby BKKBILL » Thu Dec 23, 2010 2:17 pm

Apetley, now that the monsoon has past got to wondering how the orchid garden Nicky was planing has worked out.

I try but never have any luck with them. :(
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Re: Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

Postby apetley » Fri Dec 24, 2010 10:51 am

Hi Bill, the orchid garden is fine thanks for asking.
I would post you a pic but my camera has died a death.
One thing I did notice is that orchids on the side that caught most sun really were having a hard time so we moved them around to the side that only got light sun in the morning.
Also it seems that ours thrive on a daily soaking so that's one of my early evening duties.
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Re: Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

Postby BKKBILL » Fri Dec 24, 2010 4:52 pm

apetley wrote:
I would post you a pic but my camera has died a death.


Maybe Santa will be good to you. :lol:

apetley wrote:One thing I did notice is that orchids on the side that caught most sun really were having a hard time so we moved them around to the side that only got light sun in the morning.
Also it seems that ours thrive on a daily soaking so that's one of my early evening duties.


Mine were in shade so guess it was the daily watering that did them in. :(

Have a good Christmas one and all :D :D :mrgreen: :D :D
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Re: Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

Postby apetley » Sat Jul 16, 2011 9:14 am

Nicky has finally decided that after nearly three years 'suffering' in our western style kitchen she really needs her own Thai kitchen so this week she started her own project to get one built.
It's to be 3mX6m, very simple and she's hoping to build for about 70k bht all in.
A local village builder has been called into action and started work last Monday digging out the post holes.
A night at his cousins monks party meant no work on Tuesday and he went awol on Wednesday so it was not a happy Nicky who watched the posts go in Thursday along with some of the steelwork. That was finished yesterday, Friday, so she was quite a bit happier and all seems back on track for now.
The roof is going on first as this being the raining season it should provide some cover to allow work to proceed.
Attachments
TK1.jpg
Nicky decided the best place for her Thai kitchen will be alongside the orchid garden near the pond.
TK2.jpg
Anyone who has read about the trouble we had fitting one of the septics maybe pleased to know that is is finally serving a useful purpose as a cement mixer after the base was chopped off.
TK3.jpg
Posts in place alongside the orchid garden
TK4.jpg
Steelwork gets enamel coat on top of it's primer
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Re: Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

Postby nanbuilder » Mon Jul 18, 2011 11:20 am

jazzman wrote:
I personally favour the house water system where a ground level tank is filled from the mains water with the house supply usually on the mains pressure. When the mains water supply fails (and it often does in rural areas) the demand pump will kick in and supply water from the tank. A demand pump has a pressostat and only runs when you open a tap (faucet).

We have the large concrete pots adapted for a float valve. The concrete gets moist and evaporates slightly, keepting the water inside nice and cool. one pot is fillde by the mains, the other by rain water. We use the rain water for cooking and brewing tea.


Jazzman I am half way through apetley's thread. Have you please got a photo of the plumbing/valve configuration of the 'large concrete pots'

Apetley I am totally enthralled with your build - looks fantastic so far - reading it like a story so hoping the end is as successful as the beginning and middle. I have learnt so many things so far. Many thanks.
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Re: Building in Don Tau It, Kanchanaburi

Postby nanbuilder » Mon Jul 18, 2011 6:31 pm

OK - got to the end of the thread at last. Well done guys for a brilliant build with very little drama. Hope mine will complete with as much luck (and judgement) as yours. I have dozens of generic questions which I will ask in the appropriate construction threads. A real education for me and wifey - thank you!
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