Phuket Eco-Home

Any story related to building in the LOS, whether everything turned out hunky dory or not!

Moderators: MGV12, BKKBILL, fredlk

Postby chiangmaiexpat » Sat May 17, 2008 8:02 pm

Awesome views! When is the house warming party? :D

If I am informed correctly, there was a breakthrough in increasing the efficiency of photovoltaic cells in the last decade, but the whole system is still quite expensive. The building integrated modules being offered today certainly make a very cool roof.

Thanks for the photos.

Cheers, CMX
chiangmaiexpat
 
Posts: 281
Joined: Mon May 12, 2008 8:44 am

Postby Nawty » Sun May 18, 2008 12:27 pm

By foundations I mean how is this constructed ? It looks like a single post, but presume it is either several single posts or one long support wall. But what is underneath this ? and why was it built this way, instead of several supports spread out bearing the load rather than just in the middle like this ?


As for solar, I read about systems that feed there excess energy from the system, be it solar, wind or a combination of both, back into the grid. Does this then bypass the need for batteries and storage on site ? Is there a way where your system produces electricity and it is fed straight to the grid through your meter, then you use your energy from the grid back via another meter and whatever the difference is, positive or negative, you pay for. Is this happening anywhere and even a possibility ?
Attachments
P1030470.JPG
User avatar
Nawty
 
Posts: 804
Joined: Mon May 07, 2007 12:23 pm

Postby grant » Sun May 18, 2008 3:00 pm

Nawty wrote:By foundations I mean how is this constructed ? It looks like a single post, but presume it is either several single posts or one long support wall. But what is underneath this ? and why was it built this way, instead of several supports spread out bearing the load rather than just in the middle like this ?

As for solar, I read about systems that feed there excess energy from the system, be it solar, wind or a combination of both, back into the grid. Does this then bypass the need for batteries and storage on site ? Is there a way where your system produces electricity and it is fed straight to the grid through your meter, then you use your energy from the grid back via another meter and whatever the difference is, positive or negative, you pay for. Is this happening anywhere and even a possibility ?


The vertical beam is actually a wall that runs the length of the pool. The pool sits on this wall. Underneath the wall is the foundation I mentioned earlier. Vertical support columns could have been used instead of the wall and they would have been far less expensive but the cantilevered effect would have been lost.

Yes, no batteries are required. This is also know as netmetering and it is available in Thailand (http://www.netmeter.org). It is common in the US and Canada. In most cases the electrical utility will supply you with a special meter that can spin backwards so when you are producing more energy than you are using, it spins backwards. This is what I plan to do.
grant
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:48 pm
Location: Phuket

Postby jazzman » Sat May 31, 2008 5:04 pm

If the PV solar system is reaquired to take over in case of a black-out, them some system of electricity storage will be required. This is done by batteries.

Solar PV produces current at around 12 -16 V and needs to go through an expensive to produce 220V. Even more critical than providing the volts, is the provision of sufficient amperage to cover your needs.

Solar PV is still extremely expensive - with or without batteries - and an accurate study needs to be carried out to evaluate any genuine savings even if net-metering is used; electrical energy in Thailand is very cheap - do check if your local electricity office has even heard of it, as you might need their permission.

A large scale installation, for a hotel or leisure complex or for a housing village may provide some ROI on the very long term, otherwise PV is only really a solution for isolated areas where the cost of bringing mains power on poles and installing a sub-station would exceed the cost of PV.

Of course, anyone who can simply afford the luxury of PV would naturally be doing a great contribution to global energy saving.
jazzman
 
Posts: 2161
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:11 pm
Location: Thailand

Postby grant » Sat May 31, 2008 7:01 pm

Yes, PV is still expensive in Thailand without incentives but that is about to change along with incentives for wind energy. I was expecting the incentives to be announced within the next couple of months but the current political situation may delay the roll out. Regardless, Thailand will be offering tax breaks and/or incentives for using solar and wind for generating electricity in the near future.
grant
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:48 pm
Location: Phuket

Postby jazzman » Sun Jun 01, 2008 7:19 am

Yes, but will it compensate for the disproportionately high cost of PV vs mains electricity? At well over 1 mio baht for a standard family home, I don't think it will - my electricity bill is is only 1,500 - 1,900 baht per month (using passive cooling of course).
jazzman
 
Posts: 2161
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:11 pm
Location: Thailand

Postby grant » Sun Jun 01, 2008 12:09 pm

jazzman wrote:Yes, but will it compensate for the disproportionately high cost of PV vs mains electricity? At well over 1 mio baht for a standard family home, I don't think it will - my electricity bill is is only 1,500 - 1,900 baht per month (using passive cooling of course).


No unfortunately not. Passive cooling should always be the primary means of limiting electricity costs and you've obviously done well if your monthly bills are so low, given the size of your villa.
grant
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:48 pm
Location: Phuket

Postby grant » Thu Jun 05, 2008 7:11 pm

Some pics of the main living area walls and columns poured in the past couple of weeks. The fair faced concrete walls are turning out much better than expected considering the labor crew had never built them before.
Attachments
P1030636.JPG
Column detail. Plastic is to protect the columns while pouring concrete on the floor above.
P1030628.JPG
Cantilevered stairs. Much easier to make than I thought they would be. But requires big rebar.
P1030634.JPG
Exterior of fair faced living room wall.
P1030631.JPG
Living room wall detail with the form ties still in place.
P1030626.JPG
Living room wall interior.
grant
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:48 pm
Location: Phuket

Postby Nawty » Thu Jun 05, 2008 7:21 pm

Why is it called 'fair faced' concrete walls. never heard it before.

How are you going to finish those walls ? got any examples of finished walls anywhere ?
User avatar
Nawty
 
Posts: 804
Joined: Mon May 07, 2007 12:23 pm

Postby grant » Thu Jun 05, 2008 8:23 pm

Nawty wrote:Why is it called 'fair faced' concrete walls. never heard it before.

How are you going to finish those walls ? got any examples of finished walls anywhere ?


I'm not sure where the name came from but it essentially is concrete that is poured in custom made forms where the surface of the form determines the finished face of the concrete. The finish you see in the pics is the finished product. Apart from cleaning and applying a sealant, the surface is not changed in any way except perhaps adding color if desired via the use of liquid pigments mixed with a clear sealer. There are many types of fair faced concrete and up until recently it was mostly used in commercial applications but it is increasingly being used in residential applications. Once it's been sealed, it's virtually maintenance free. More info and pics of fair faced concrete can be found here: http://www.coolthaihouse.com/forum/view ... d+concrete
grant
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:48 pm
Location: Phuket

Postby chiangmaiexpat » Fri Jun 06, 2008 8:06 am

In Thailand, fair faced concrete seems to be quite a new trend in residential construction. Or perhaps, it isn't yet a trend. In Germany, people have been building fair faced concrete houses in the 70s. I remember several of them being built around that time in my home town, but apparently it didn't catch on. It's still common in civil engineering and commercial buildings, though.

Other concrete techniques, such as acid staining, colouring, stencilling, surface moulding, antiquing, etc. appear to be quite new. At least I haven't heard of them 10 years ago. When I still lived in Bangkok, I noticed an increase of driveways with concrete "faux pavement" which employs some of these techniques. Haven't seen much of it in Chiang Mai yet. But Chiang Mai always takes a bit longer. :D

Cheers, CMX
chiangmaiexpat
 
Posts: 281
Joined: Mon May 12, 2008 8:44 am

Postby Nawty » Fri Jun 06, 2008 9:38 am

Concrete and corrugated sheeting will take a long time to take off here.

In Oz they are both used in modern design and look great.

Here, concrete is seen a cheap and nasty as a finish and the people who have some cash to buy nice homes will not allow a cheap and nasty look, even though many of their choices ultimately end up that way unknowingly.

Corrugated iron is seen ans labourers quarters and rice farmers house and will be never used in up market homes here to any great success for a long long time.

I know because a house I designed had concrete counter tops in 2 areas, a carport floor in poliched concrete and also one balcony.

The hiso buyer wanted them immediately changed to tile and stone.

I had also contemplated a steel sheet feature area in the kitchen.....lucky I never carried it through.

Both these materials will be used for your own design in your own homes for the near futrue only me thinks and if you do use it as some have here in your own home design, if you ever think you may want to sell, you should have a contingancy plan to cover those areas in render, paint, stone or tiles and luckily most of these areas can be easily covered for a future possible thai buyer.
User avatar
Nawty
 
Posts: 804
Joined: Mon May 07, 2007 12:23 pm

Re: Phuket Eco-Home

Postby Nawty » Thu Sep 03, 2009 10:02 am

Finished yet ??

would like to see it
conwood is not real wood.....break it down 'con' to deceive...'wood'
User avatar
Nawty
 
Posts: 804
Joined: Mon May 07, 2007 12:23 pm

Re: Phuket Eco-Home

Postby Nemo » Thu Sep 03, 2009 2:35 pm

I thought solar power (even in Thailand) was only ever worth it or low power applications (e.g.: used for water heating in the UK).
What's the likely consumption like? What would you be powering off it? Just lighting in the evenings/night.

Would having a micro-hydro setup would be a good option... or is it tricky getting hold of a hillside with a stream?!
Nemo
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:17 pm

Re: Phuket Eco-Home

Postby jazzman » Fri Sep 04, 2009 12:04 am

You'll probably find everything you need to know here:
viewtopic.php?f=18&t=390
- if not, don't hesitate to repost your questions there.
How to build a $20,000 / £14,000 house and a $???? MOTEL Updated 21 March 09 - with BOQ and costs
Don't let this happen in YOUR house.
jazzman
 
Posts: 2161
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:11 pm
Location: Thailand

PreviousNext

Return to Your Building Story

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 1 guest