BEST WAY TO KEEPING YOUR BUNGALOW COOL WITHOUT A/C

Air conditioning, fans, and anything related to keeping it cool, such as insulation. This would include any posts generally discussing how to keep it cool, such as which types of blocks are better insulators.... ideal wall thickness for keeping an A/C house cool, etc.

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BEST WAY TO KEEPING YOUR BUNGALOW COOL WITHOUT A/C

Postby JASONTHAI » Sun Sep 24, 2006 12:02 am

Hi I am starting building my bungalow next Feb and was wondering on the following questions

(1) which is the best for keeping the heat out for the roof (concreate tiles or the ugly metal sheets/ tiles)

(2) my place will have a living space of about 77 sq metres so I now the roof will be bigger than this how much would I be looking to spend on the roof again for a concreate roof tiles or metal sheets/tiles per sq metre

(3) What is the best instirlation for the roof & walls to keep the heat out & cool air in ?

Thanks for you help

Jason
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Postby Itchy » Sun Sep 24, 2006 1:56 pm

There is some information on the topic of roof insulation discussed in an earlier topic, here.

http://coolthaihouse.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=254&highlight=

4 inches of standard Fibreglass/rockwool insulation above ceilings works fine, but works even better if you have vents in the eves of your house.

The best vents I have seen are mock windows with louvered shutters. Located on oposite sides of the house they ensure a good air flow through the roof space. (Like leaving a door open at the front and back of a house, the wind almost whistles through - taking with it all the hot air from the roof).

"Keeping cool in" is a common misunderstanding of how insulation works.

Heat travels from hot areas to cold areas _ Insulation slows down the movement.

If the sun is out your roof space will always be warmer than the interior of the house, so heat will be trying to move from the roof space to the house.

Bulk insulation slows down this movement, and air vents in the roof get rid of as much of the hot air as possible.

Don't forget, because your airvents need to be large (window sized) they are also security risks, not only that they are an access point for insects and vermin.

So fit internal bars and bug screens.

This is where louvered shutters come in, the cover up the security bars and disguise the purpose of the vents(windows).

To a similar end, I'm considering fittnig a mock chimney to vent the roof space.

Other Cooling Tricks

Fit overhanging shades or shutters over windows to prevent sunlight streaming directly into the house.

Extend your roof out over the walls to cast a shadow on walls, windows and doors.

Plant trees/bushes so as to cast a shaddow over the house (Be careful about providing cover and access to burgalars)

Add a terrace at the back of the house and grow creapers over a framework to form a green covering over the terrace/one wall of the house - This will create a remarkably cool spot to sit and to allow cool air to enter the house.

Orientate your house design so that rooms you relax/sleep in are not on the afternoon sun side of the house.
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Postby JASONTHAI » Wed Sep 27, 2006 7:54 pm

Thanks for the info, so now I know to go with 2 layers of reflective double sheet for the roof, just under the tiles with a 2 air vents at end side covered by mos nets & bars (is this correct?)

next question is the walls which is the best bricks to use, I don't want the cheap 3 baht cerment blocks which they often use in Thai houses, which do you recommend super blocks? are they available in Korat?

Cheers
Jason

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Postby Attila » Fri Sep 29, 2006 9:35 am

First of all: nice summary, Itchy!


JASONTHAI wrote:Thanks for the info, so now I know to go with 2 layers of reflective double sheet for the roof, just under the tiles with a 2 air vents at end side covered by mos nets & bars (is this correct?)


Jason, there is a reason that Itchy did not list reflective sheets. Their effectivity is quite much in doubt by too many experts. Especially after 3 months, when dust settling on the sheet reduces the reflection effect.

JASONTHAI wrote:next question is the walls which is the best bricks to use, I don't want the cheap 3 baht cerment blocks which they often use in Thai houses, which do you recommend super blocks?


There are looong discussions about that here already, you might want to browser through the forum a while to see all the pros and cons.

I did build with Q-Con blocks - loadbearing walls, no posts - and I would do it again. Even walls with hours of sun in the afternoon do not get warm inside. (in Itchy speak: the time the heat needs to travel through them is longer than the time they are exposed to the sun, thus the heat does not really arrive inside in time.)

Alternatively build a double layer of the cement blocks, or do not use the small ones, but the thicker and much stronger ones, which you can also use for loadbearing walls. Many details again in older threads discussed here.

JASONTHAI wrote:are they available in Korat?


Q-Con delivers all over Thailand, and is much cheaper if you order directly from factory. You just pay more for transport if it is more far away. Probably the same is true for the thicker cement blocks.

Jason, using Q-Con blocks, reflective windows, and a good ventilation I can even have a cool office despite computers running all day without any aircon at all.

And for the roof I used real tiles, clay tiles, which are much more expensive but whenever I climb up there I can still breath which I hardly can in roofs made from these cement tiles, the cement dust is terrible (for me). Also no need for reflective sheets noted here, may be the clay tiles have an effect here, but not sure.
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Postby JASONTHAI » Sat Sep 30, 2006 5:59 am

Attila wrote:First of all: nice summary, Itchy!


JASONTHAI wrote:Thanks for the info, so now I know to go with 2 layers of reflective double sheet for the roof, just under the tiles with a 2 air vents at end side covered by mos nets & bars (is this correct?)


Jason, there is a reason that Itchy did not list reflective sheets. Their effectivity is quite much in doubt by too many experts. Especially after 3 months, when dust settling on the sheet reduces the reflection effect.

Hi Attila I know what you mean about the dust settling that why I will have 2 layers so if one has dust the bottom layer will still protect am I right ?

JASONTHAI wrote:next question is the walls which is the best bricks to use, I don't want the cheap 3 baht cerment blocks which they often use in Thai houses, which do you recommend super blocks?


There are looong discussions about that here already, you might want to browser through the forum a while to see all the pros and cons.

I did build with Q-Con blocks - loadbearing walls, no posts - and I would do it again. Even walls with hours of sun in the afternoon do not get warm inside. (in Itchy speak: the time the heat needs to travel through them is longer than the time they are exposed to the sun, thus the heat does not really arrive inside in time.)

Alternatively build a double layer of the cement blocks, or do not use the small ones, but the thicker and much stronger ones, which you can also use for loadbearing walls. Many details again in older threads discussed here.

JASONTHAI wrote:are they available in Korat?


Q-Con delivers all over Thailand, and is much cheaper if you order directly from factory. You just pay more for transport if it is more far away. Probably the same is true for the thicker cement blocks.

Do you know where there factory is ?

Jason, using Q-Con blocks, reflective windows, and a good ventilation I can even have a cool office despite computers running all day without any aircon at all.

And for the roof I used real tiles, clay tiles, which are much more expensive but whenever I climb up there I can still breath which I hardly can in roofs made from these cement tiles, the cement dust is terrible (for me). Also no need for reflective sheets noted here, may be the clay tiles have an effect here, but not sure.


So how much are the clay tiles also what price would I expect to pay for the roof the living area is 77 metres so I know the roof is going to be bigger than this
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Overhanging Eaves

Postby jazzman » Thu Dec 21, 2006 12:03 pm

Overhanging Eaves, 90cm - 1m is standard for a roof pitched at 30 degrees and even a bit further at the gable ends of a saddle roof, will also keep the sun off the walls of a single storey house for much of the 12 hour day, and certainly when the sun is at its higher and most intense angles.

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