Is it okay to use a 220v, 15 amp receptacle?

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Is it okay to use a 220v, 15 amp receptacle?

Postby kmanonmaui » Tue Feb 06, 2018 10:23 pm

Came across some receptacles I like, but they are only 15 amp. I know next to nothing about electricity but they outlets/receptacles have the ability to accept almost any standard Thai or US cord (of course, subject to the device being able to run 220/240v and, I assume, require 15a or less).

Not sure what the standard is for receptacles in Thailand (not those for a hot water heater or a/c unit, just ones you would have in bedrooms for smaller devices) but am sure one of you all can point me in the right direction.

Thanks in advance,
-k-
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Re: Is it okay to use a 220v, 15 amp receptacle?

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:53 pm

kmanonmaui wrote:Came across some receptacles I like, but they are only 15 amp.
-k-


I would not say "only 15 amp." as that is virtually the standard size.

Anything that needs more than 15 amps in a domestic setup should probably be hard wired. The standard power draw on a 2.5mm cable is 20 amp, so your sockets will be fine.

Do you have anything that draws over 3,300 watts?

Don't forget your not in Kansas anymore. Your dealing with sensible voltages now.

I don't know of any domestic appliances that are any where near that, even my 4 horse power table saw is only 3,000 watts.
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Re: Is it okay to use a 220v, 15 amp receptacle?

Postby Klondyke » Wed Feb 07, 2018 7:27 am

Don't forget your not in Kansas anymore. Your dealing with sensible voltages now.


Wondering how less sensible it is in Kansas (with 110V)? Such a 4HP appliance with just 30 Amps? :D
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Re: Is it okay to use a 220v, 15 amp receptacle?

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:47 am

Klondyke wrote:
Don't forget your not in Kansas anymore. Your dealing with sensible voltages now.


Wondering how less sensible it is in Kansas (with 110V)? Such a 4HP appliance with just 30 Amps? :D


The lower the voltage, the larger you need the wiring, breakers, and sockets for any appliance for a given power draw. This of course means the all of that is more expensive and more difficult to install for power hungry items.

My 4 horse power motor (together with its 3hp friend) will work on any standard socket and wiring (2.5mm) in the "civilised power" world. But Toto would have to run a special circuit, quite possibly at a non standard voltage, to run it and it's 3 horse power friend. :?
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Re: Is it okay to use a 220v, 15 amp receptacle?

Postby kmanonmaui » Wed Feb 07, 2018 6:28 pm

Sometimewoodworker wrote:-Don't forget your not in Kansas anymore.
-The lower the voltage, the larger you need the wiring, breakers, and sockets for any appliance for a given power draw.


Ok, learning as I go...par the course. Thanks for the responses.

Actually, many a decade ago, it was Missouri, but close enough to Kansas I suppose :-)

While it makes sense, again only having my very *limited* exposure to electrical wiring (in the US) where I only have seen the 220v for the Stove and Dryer being much "thicker" than those of all the 110v//115v outlets, it was not my first guess...and as I admitted from the get-go, the only thing I know about electricity is to not make any decisions without some expert advice.

Anywho - On a trip back to the US now for a few weeks and picking up some of those "precious items I want but don't really *have to have* items", like a concrete stair edger that also puts a nice tread on the edge of the steps, concrete floats that are designed to be used with a handle so my workers won't have to keep walking on our pours and pushing the rebar and wire down, gummed rolling papers for my friends that roll and smoke their own, Aspirin, etc. So, figured when I came across these 110v/220v outlets that have the ability to accept almost any input plug (other than those I found in SIngapore, that I know of thus far) and they have the easy push-in wiring, I wanted to buy a bunch to bring back with me.

Never did find any 220v outlets with GFI, but have come to understand that this is usually done at the breaker level (either in Thailand or for everyplace with 220v)...breakers with GFI is, of course, *new* to me.

Also, in case anyone is doing a SEARCH, I did find a Tyvek (House Wrap) dealer that will ship all over Thailand. While not relevant to this thread, hopefully it may help someone searching for such in the future. Their phone number is 0854465955. Would post the company name, but don't seem to have it handy. Anyway, the guy spoke perfect English and Thai and is putting together the quote to provide their product (They have two Tyvek Products) that I want to be delivered to the job site.

Now wondering if there is really any material advantage to me running 3-phase. Actually do not know if I can use the same wiring to the regular (non-dedicated) outlets as I would with just a hot/neutral/ground and make that decision once I bring in the PEA guy we are hiring on the side to bring in the power from the main and build out my panels... or if I need to make this decision in advance. *Think* he can wire the 3-phase based upon knowing that all hot's are "this color", "neutral this color" and "ground this color". But not really sure.

So, if you electric savvy guys can advise, would appreciate. My *thought* was to run key (necessary) items to one panel (fridge, one a/c, water pump, nominal lighting, etc.) and my generator's fail-over can connect to in the event of a main outage. And, then have a second panel that would would supply all other "non-essential" items...being the bulk...to a second panel.

But, again, this is just my novice thoughts about how things *might* work. I'd like to run all of the (easy) internal wiring prior to bringing in the PEA guy coming in and having to make a single or 3-phase decision. But if I need to do special wiring for 3-phase first, then I probably need to get him in there beforehand.

Anyway, if you made it this far you are probably tired of reading my ramblings...so THANKS!

-k-
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Re: Is it okay to use a 220v, 15 amp receptacle?

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Wed Feb 07, 2018 7:11 pm

As far as 3 phase is concerned you probably don't need or want it.

Step 1) calculate your total maximum power draw, remember that AC power should be divided by 3 as you will almost never run at more than that, and that you will never be running everything at one time.

Don't forget that if you have decided to bring any 110v items (not recommended) you are going to have to allow for transformer losses, and you will need a very substantial step up transformer (50%~100% more capacity than the item it's used with), think heavy, power hungry, and hot.

Step 2) If the total is near 38,000 watts then you may want 3 phase it is substantially more expensive than single phase, or if you can't get a 30/100 meter.

You will almost certainly wire the house as 3 separate single phase setups, you will have to ensure that you balance the house load so that no 1 phase is drawing substantial more, or less than another (your responsibility) if you don't then the PEA is going to be very unhappy with you.

kmanonmaui wrote:
I came across these 110v/220v outlets that have the ability to accept almost any input plug (other than those I found in SIngapore, that I know of thus far) and they have the easy push-in wiring, I wanted to buy a bunch to bring back with me.

-k-

There is a style of socket that will accept almost every plug you can find that is easily available here. Not suitable for any house that has young children ever using it because there is nothing stopping you from poking quite large bits of metal into the line section. But for an adult only house they are perfectly OK.
IMG_3214.JPG
Last edited by Sometimewoodworker on Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Additionall information
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Re: Is it okay to use a 220v, 15 amp receptacle?

Postby Klondyke » Wed Feb 07, 2018 9:10 pm

kmanonmaui wrote:Anywho - On a trip back to the US now for a few weeks and picking up some of those "precious items I want but don't really *have to have* items...",
-k-


My two cents..: howmuch wonderful and a workmanship time saving tools you are possessing, keep them hidden from your workers. Firstly, they like to work with their tools only. Secondly, in case that after all they would like your items, you would not like them (the items) once you get them back. :cry:
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Re: Is it okay to use a 220v, 15 amp receptacle?

Postby mikenot » Thu Feb 08, 2018 1:30 am

Sometimewoodworker wrote:There is a style of socket that will accept almost every plug you can find that is easily available here. Not suitable for any house that has young children ever using it because there is nothing stopping you from poking quite large bits of metal into the line section. But for an adult only house they are perfectly OK.
The attachment IMG_3214.JPG is no longer available


or these Clipsal ones at Homepro, and presumably the other "GlobalThaiHome"stores, universal with the safety shutter :
socket.jpg

or from Bticino :
socket 2.jpg
socket 2.jpg (3.7 KiB) Viewed 151 times

also at Homepro.
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Re: Is it okay to use a 220v, 15 amp receptacle?

Postby Roger Ramjet » Thu Feb 08, 2018 10:14 pm

There is an even simpler solution: Buy sockets with an on off switch and do what I did, place them about 1 1/2 metres off the ground. When all the kids from the extended family arrive they can't reach them and the ones that can already know about electricity.
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Re: Is it okay to use a 220v, 15 amp receptacle?

Postby kmanonmaui » Sat Feb 10, 2018 1:30 pm

Klondyke wrote:My two cents..: howmuch wonderful and a workmanship time saving tools you are possessing, keep them hidden from your workers. Firstly, they like to work with their tools only. Secondly, in case that after all they would like your items, you would not like them (the items) once you get them back. :cry:


Perhaps this is the case for most people, and perhaps I am naive enough to believe that this is not the case with my workers. I will certainly admit to both of these. However, I *seem* to have developed a very good relationship with my crew. They understand that I am open to being told my idea(s) are simply nuts, not reasonable, etc. and they seem open to trying out new ways and things. I would say, so far, 75% of the time, I have been corrected into their way of doing things and maybe 5% of the time it was a toss up. But about 20% of the time, once they have seen what I want to do and why, they have gravitated to the change.

As far as I know, not a single screw has been stolen. I did, by accident, over pay a worker a month or so back. He brought it to my attention. Since then I have intentionally over paid two others that I had concerns about. Both times the money was returned the next day.

They are working while we are away for three weeks, but send me multiple pictures each day of their progress and when payroll is due I get an itemized list from my "foreman" and I transfer the funds to his account to pay everyone.

Again, I'll give you that I could just be naive but I do believe that there are good and bad people in every country and in every walk of life. My preference is to give the benefit of the doubt until I find out otherwise.

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