I WOULD LIKE TO BUILD A 2 BEDROOM BUNGALOW IN KORAT HOW MUCH

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I WOULD LIKE TO BUILD A 2 BEDROOM BUNGALOW IN KORAT HOW MUCH

Postby JASONTHAI » Sun Feb 26, 2006 6:38 am

Hi I would like 2 build a 2 bedroom bungalow in Korat with large thai kitchen small bathroom with shower no bathtub, I don't need a carport but I would like to add a small area outside with a roof so we can open a sort of food shop selling food & drink and general household goods and seating about 16 people so room enough for about 4 tables and 1 or 2 fridges and a small area for cooking does anyone know the cost for this just for the bunglow and roof for outside area (I already have the land)for the bungalow I would like titled roof with a metal roof for the outside area.

Second question is I should be having the land filled in April do you know how long I will have to wait before I can start building

Cheers
Jason

:shock:
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Postby Itchy » Sun Feb 26, 2006 3:59 pm

Welcome Jason,

I think common wisdom is that you should allow infill land to settle through one rainy season. Others will advise you better than I could, but i do know that when you put down your foundations they should go right into the original earth, below the infil.

When you get to doing your layout drawings, think carefully about 'Private Space' and 'Public Space'.

If the public space impeades on your private space then you will have no break from people and your business. Under similar situation I would be looking to place my living room and master bedroom at the oposite corner to the business, with the main door into the house spererate from the business too.

Just some things to think about when drawing up plans.
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Postby dozer » Sun Feb 26, 2006 4:27 pm

I agree with Itchy that if you have the luxury you should wait a season, you can get away with three or four months. They also have vibration machines they can bring out to solidify the soil, but normally not used.

Costs on construction are all over the place, for fairly decent Thai style about 3000 per sq. meter, expat style normally with fixtures 7000 +. Of course a lot depends on fixtures, materials and design.
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Postby Thaifu T » Sun Feb 26, 2006 8:56 pm

The advice I was given when I bought the land in Khon Kaen was to leave the 'fill' to settle for 12 months before starting to build.

Hope this helps, cheers
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Jamie's KoRat House

Postby ThailandTony » Sun Mar 26, 2006 4:58 pm

I have a friend about 40Km from KoRat towards Chok Chai that built a house very similar to your outline with the exception of the business aspects. I think 7000 sqm is spot on. My friend has a nice 2 bed 2 bath with an outside covered seating area. He was also a 1st time house-builder but was very positive about his experience (I will have to introduce him to this site). I go along with all of the previous posts, my only addition would be to open a discussion on piling! Another friend is putting the finishing touches on his house at the other end of my village and rather than wait for infill to settle he opted to use piles to support his foundations. I believe the total cost for this "no-wait" option was in the region of 50,000, but will confirm when I am back home in the near future. Even though my own land has been filled for over 12 months I am also planning to pile as it is some 2m down to my original earth. Anyone with piling experience in and out of Thailand please impart your experience. (I will also introduce my friend in the village to this site as, as well as being in the same boat as us, he comes with some stripes already as he is a semi-retired lecturer in civil construction).
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Postby SVielha » Mon Mar 27, 2006 12:26 pm

When I filled up the ground for our house, I have waited 2 years before building the house and than I filled up the ground, where it went down.

Of course it will be faster, if you use machines, but even than I would wait a minimum of 1 raining season.
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Postby JASONTHAI » Tue May 02, 2006 10:07 am

Hi I am waiting until April next year before I build so this should be enough time for the land to settle but I am going back in 6 weeks time so do you think I can build a wall around the land them wait to April to start building

:roll:
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Postby dozer » Sat May 06, 2006 8:22 am

I like to plan building projects for starting in December, because the rainy season is April/May - November. You can build it in the rainy season but it can be a bit of a hassle.
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Postby JASONTHAI » Tue Aug 22, 2006 9:36 pm

I have a rough plan to what I want to to build see attached file sorry it is in excel format as I do not know how to use CAD or other software like that, anyway how much would you think this would cost to build and have I got the figures right for the size of the house (SQ METRES?)
Attachments
Book1.xls
(21.5 KiB) Downloaded 397 times
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Postby SVielha » Wed Aug 23, 2006 4:27 pm

One thig I can tell you is, that 70 cm for the hallway is to narrow/small. 8)

Also I don`t know, if it`s a good idear to put the kitchen in the middle of the house. :?
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Postby JASONTHAI » Wed Aug 23, 2006 6:47 pm

Hi I agree the hallway is to norrow, I think it should be 1 metre wide, also we will be doing the cooking outside just infront of the shop, so having a kitchen in the middle of the house should be o.k ?

Cheers
Jason
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Postby jazzman » Thu Dec 07, 2006 9:45 pm

Hi there, you probably have all the answers you wanted by now because the thread has practically dried up. I only discovered it yesterday.
Jason, I downloaded your plans, and I can't understand why you want 2 metre (6 foot) thick garden walls.) A hallway, if you really must have one - ought to be a bit more than one metre wide if you don't want to feel you are living in a caravan. You'll be banging your elbows on both sides of it as you walk along it and doing an irish Jig to get past anyone coming the other way. A corridor should be at least 1m30 or more, but this would now compromise the width of the rooms you have built alongside it.

My house floor is 156 sq.m - i think a little larger than yours. Living room, kitchen, 3 bedrooms (one with en suite). The front door in the porch gives straight into an L-shaped living room and the other rooms go off that. We are also building a seperate 6x10 metre minimart with a couple of tables, a nice 5m diametre octagonal 'sala' and a 4x10 metre concrete in-ground swimming pool, and four 4m x 4m bungalows with en suite bathrooms.

i raised my land with 40 cm of dry dirt in March, but it was already a fairly firm building plot which althouggh totally overgrown, had never been used. I let it settle until the rains stopped four weeks ago and now it's as dry as a bone. We poured 18 foundation posts 1.5 metres deep and ran 40x20cm reinforced footings between them, so the floor is made up of 4x4 metre segments which generally corresponds to the walls of the rooms except the largish living room which is 7 x 7.

The entire cost of the project down to the last nut and bolt and labour is less than 850,000 baht without compromising on quality.

If you haver not started yet , i would be happy to provide you with any other details and particularly how to build your foundations.
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Comments

Postby hkexpat » Fri Dec 08, 2006 9:55 am

JASONTHAI wrote:I have a rough plan to what I want to to build see attached file sorry it is in excel format as I do not know how to use CAD or other software like that, anyway how much would you think this would cost to build and have I got the figures right for the size of the house (SQ METRES?)


I would recommend that you draw up a couple of scaled cross sections so you can see for yourself how the ceiling and floor heights, windows and doors look. The amount of natural light seems to be in adequate, the rooms look like they could use more windows.

What will the roof look like, how will it sit on the structure and thus where are your load bearing walls?

There is design software you can buy for around $100 US$ or 100baht on the market, it may be worth investing in this if you want to take control of the design.

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drawing plans

Postby jazzman » Fri Dec 08, 2006 12:55 pm

Expat has made some very useful comments, particularly about the probable lack of natural light. I drew my plans simply by using illustrator. They comprise a floor plan; front, side, and rear elevations, and a roof plan showing all the joists, rafters, purlins, struts etc. The result was perfectly professional - the builders did not need telling how to build houses, just to follow the diagrams. I have also done a wiring diagram and a plumbing diagram, but I'm not going to publish those because, although there are lots of ways to skin a bear - and i know my plumbing and electrics are professional - I don't have a PhD in the subject and I'm I'm not going to invite any criticism.
I tried to upload the plans to this forum, but although they are only a few kb and saved in .gif, I was told they were to large. if any one would like them, i would be happy to e-mail them. They are a good example of the minimum documentation you need for Thai builders who have already built a house or two. They usually know best when it comes to footings and foundations, although I did surprise them with a few of my own tips.
Usually, only Brits and Northern Europeans build with load bearing walls in Thailand. This comes from being used to building cavity walls for insulation from the cold, but which also provide a very strong support. My roof rests on 18, 20x20cm piles and 6inch x 2inch steel beams. (a bit like houses are built in southern Europe). When the floor is poured and the roof is finished, we will build the exterior and interior walls. That's not such a bad idea either, because if the next rainy season is on us before we're finished, at least we will be working in the dry!

If you want to design your house yourself, but don't really know where to start, there is a series of three books in Thailand which are collections of several developers' model houses with photos and useable floor plans which you could modify to your heart's content to suit your purpose - including the shop. the dimensions are not shown but if you are aware that almost everything here is built in modular dimensions of 4 x 4 metres, you can usually work it out. (an outline of a king size bed in a bedroom plan will give you an idea of the scale, because it is exactly 6ft x 6ft: practically 2m x 2m). Volume one is called (I hope this forum and your browser handles UTF-8 Unicode fonts) รวม 120 แบบบ้านสวย เล่มผิเศษ which is all pronounced Ruam, nung roi yii sip bebban suwai, lempiset which all means something like "120 Beautiful Houses", Volume one. ISBN 974-272-710-4. There are two further volumes which cover two storey buildings and houses for bigger budgets. It's available at all good bookstores and many hardware shops sell it too. Costs about 250 baht. My wife bought it while i was still away working in Bangkok. She didn't know at that time that I am perfectly capable of designing my own home, but it does give a useful reference. there is also a section on swimming pools. All the houses in the book are turn key solutions and are all priced at exactly 10,000 baht per sq.m If you want to build one of the designs yourself with your own team of builders, it should not cost you more than half that.
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