What Clients Want and What It Should Cost

Anything to do with prices. Raw material prices or prices for finished material (or labor such as well drilling). Project prices (how much will it cost??), etc.

Moderators: Sometimewoodworker, MGV12, BKKBILL

Postby the limey » Tue Aug 23, 2005 6:21 pm

Ahhhh, I forgot the gays, now some of these can be the worst to deal with as they come on too heavily to the staff, one condo I was doing was for a gay, at the time I had about forty staff, 15 were working in the condo, 10 of them after 3 days refused to work there and I found them on other jobs of mine, I asked what was going on, yep the homosexual was coming onto strong to them, in the end it was a merry roundabout of getting staff to work there, in the end I had to resort to subbies and my female staff to work there to finish the job, the whole job took about 20 days to do the whole refurb but it was a nightmare, do you really think a builder should have to deal with this sort of customer?
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Postby the limey » Tue Aug 23, 2005 6:29 pm

Actually I have a good idea for a new section :)

How To Be A Good Customer....

Now the only times you need to check on your building progress is when the contractor asks for more money, why would you need to check it otherwise? if something is done wrong then the money will not be forthcomeing until it is corrected, it is really that simple, the only other reason you would need to see the contractor is for your changes, the contractor isn't going to change anything on your plans that he has already agreed to, because it is you that is paying.
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Postby Attila » Tue Aug 23, 2005 9:04 pm

the limey wrote:Actually I have a good idea for a new section :)

How To Be A Good Customer....

Now the only times you need to check on your building progress is when the contractor asks for more money, why would you need to check it otherwise? if something is done wrong then the money will not be forthcomeing until it is corrected, it is really that simple, the only other reason you would need to see the contractor is for your changes, the contractor isn't going to change anything on your plans that he has already agreed to, because it is you that is paying.


Yeah right. Wait until all is covered up, so you cannot see anymore what is under the cover.

Did he actually put some rebar in the concrete? Did they lift the rebar for the slab floor, or is is lying on the bottom, and not in the middle of the concrete. Did they put enough glue on the connections of the water pipes, before they did cover them with the concrete floor and tiles? And so on and so on...

This is one of the points where this site is a very good educational resource. Learn how a bad builder, a corner cutter, tries to cheat 25 satang out of you, leaving you with a soon to get repaired house.

With the information from this site (the coolthaihouse articles and blog) i could see in 2 minutes if the builders of my perimeter wall did work good or if they got lazy. To my satisfaction they did do everything correctly, despite improvising a lot to replace some missing wood. You can be sure that I did not stall for a second when they asked for their money.

Wait until it is all covered and polished? No way, how could it get checked then? Impossible.

For you as a builder it is a possibility to shine, by showing your customer the quality of construction he is getting from you. However if communicating with the customer is a problem for you, I can understand why his presence on site is bothering you. Another explanation would be that you have something to hide, but of course that is not the case here, isn't it?

And a totally different aspect - the joy and satisfaction of seeing your house grow! Building a house is a lot of money for most customers. It gives a good feeling to see the progress every day. You as a builder could use that effect to have happy customers. It's just some basic customer satisfaction skills needed, as explained earlier.
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Postby the limey » Tue Aug 23, 2005 9:17 pm

Attila I realise you don't have much knowledge of building, but the idea of staggered payments is so that you the customer can check each stage of the building process, ie lets start from the footings payment, you will see the rebar ends sticking out of the footings to be connected to the posts rebar, believe it or not it is really that simple, the oversize buildings I have done in conjunction with city hall only sent an inspector down once a week at the beginning of a job and then fornightly till we have all the beam work up.
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Clients from hell

Postby robint » Tue Aug 23, 2005 10:44 pm

:D

I fully sympathise with your problem Limey, after all, you build structures all the time, you know what you are doing. The Client has probably never even used a hammer or built anything himself

I can see some good examples of potential Clients from Hell already :D

On sites where I have worked, the Client wasn,t allowed on the site till commisioning time but of course all work was covered by full specs and guarantees. A client's third party inspector was called at predefined hold points. It works ok in a very time efficient manner, how else do you get a Polypropylene plant built in 18 months in the middle of the desert :D
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Re: Clients from hell

Postby Attila » Wed Aug 24, 2005 12:03 am

robint wrote:On sites where I have worked, the Client wasn,t allowed on the site till commisioning time but of course all work was covered by full specs and guarantees.


"specs and guarantees":?:

You might not have noticed it, we talk about building in Thailand! :wink:

Please read, for example, about the problems Peter posted here about his water pipes leaking. "guarantees" ? :lol:

If you want a guarantee here, then watch what your builder is doing. As much as you can. If you see he does it right, well, this is your guarantee.

robint wrote:A client's third party inspector was called at predefined hold points. It works ok in a very time efficient manner, how else do you get a Polypropylene plant built in 18 months in the middle of the desert :D


Obviously this does not concern what we discuss here, which is building houses in Thailand. :wink:

A third party inspector is a good idea, to help the usually less knowledgeable customer to see that the builder does build correctly. But then again that could be another can of worms, see the report of dozer on this site about his experience when he tried to get a (even recommended) engineer to look at his builder's work.

If we want to build successfully here in this country, we have to adapt to the situation in this country.

"specs and guarantees" is nothing you want to rely on here. At least not now, it will take some more time. And that is not just for home builders, I just heard even the new runways in the new airport have cracks already... don't they have "specs and guarantees" there? :wink:
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Postby Attila » Wed Aug 24, 2005 12:23 am

the limey wrote:Attila I realise you don't have much knowledge of building,


Do not worry, I realize that too. I even knew it all the time.

That's why I'm so happy that I found the coolthaihouse website with so many answers to so many questions. Questions which I did not even know yet that I would have. Very helpful for dummies like me, just like another book of the "... for dummies" series. Keeps me learning everyday! :idea: :D

the limey wrote:but the idea of staggered payments is so that you the customer can check each stage of the building process, ie lets start from the footings payment, you will see the rebar ends sticking out of the footings to be connected to the posts rebar, believe it or not it is really that simple,


Indeed, it is that simple. I would see that there are "rebar ends sticking out of the footings".

Would I know how deep they go?

Would I know how good they are positioned? centered? at the sides?

Would I know that there is rebar, and enough rebar, and positioned correctly, in the wider "foots" of the footings?

You are right, it is that simple: Of course I would not know it. All I see is some "rebar ends sticking out of the footings".

Now if I would have stopped by there regularly, I would have seen the rebar all the way down to the ground, I would have seen how it was positioned, etc. I would know that there will be no surprises, all is OK.

You are right, it is really that simple! :D
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moveable assets

Postby robint » Wed Aug 24, 2005 4:17 pm

:D

I have advocated eslwhere the concept of the shed on wheels. Factory made house in kit form. you pretty much do away with all your building conerns.

the house belongs to yuou the flang legally, you can piuck it up and move ina 10 wheeler to another piece of rented land and a new wife (sorry life) :D

wonderful idea


btwe

the funniest thing i saw was such a house doing 80 km/h down a freewway in Texas on the back of a flatbed truck

wish i had my camera then

they got some good ideas in Texas yee haa :D
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