Grease Traps

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Grease Traps

Postby thailazer » Thu Jul 24, 2014 1:41 pm

I've seen plastic grease traps for kitchen drains for sale at the hardware stores and am wondering if anyone on CTH has ever installed one. Do they work? How often do you need to clean it out? The Thai way seems to be to just let it all go into a 3 or 4 ring deep hole and pump it out after the grease cake gets too thick and am wondering if it is worth the trouble to put in a grease trap. All comments appreciated.
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Re: Grease Traps

Postby Mike Judd » Thu Jul 24, 2014 6:18 pm

It isn't all that much trouble putting one in , it obviously needs to be near the kitchen before the pipe gets too deep as the lid has to be assessable for cleaning the grease out when ever required. It's probably easier to clean that out than the ring tank if you are keeping your septic separate, which is the best way, but that's the only difference really.
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Re: Grease Traps

Postby thailazer » Thu Jul 24, 2014 6:35 pm

But how often do you have to clean it out? If it is frequently, than I would just as soon have the pumper truck come and do it every three or four years.
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Re: Grease Traps

Postby Mike Judd » Fri Jul 25, 2014 6:40 am

thailazer wrote:But how often do you have to clean it out? If it is frequently, than I would just as soon have the pumper truck come and do it every three or four years.


Well that would depend on how much oil and grease one puts down the sink, not claiming to be an expert on the subject I can only give an opinion that the ring tank might still need a certain amount of cleaning on the sides etc; as well as pumping out.Perhaps one of our members could give you a more informed answer from personal experience. :? :?
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Re: Grease Traps

Postby BKKBILL » Fri Jul 25, 2014 7:28 pm

Cleaning grease traps is a horrible job as Mike said it all depends on what you put in them. Put in a few concrete rings with a floor to make it water tight and suck it out every couple of years.

Something like this should do.
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Re: Grease Traps

Postby BKKBILL » Fri Jul 25, 2014 7:42 pm

In Canada we used something similar to this, unfortunately have no idea of availability here and this one can’t be used with PVC.

A Google search should turn up something.

http://ridgwayindustries.com/catalogue/ ... aintainer/
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Re: Grease Traps

Postby Ians » Mon Jul 28, 2014 12:36 pm

The trend now-a-days in Australia is to put all sewage and kitchen water into the septic system, this negates the need of grease traps. Grey water ie, shower, hand basins, laundry etc can be directed and mixed with the discharge from the septic system - the only down side can be any material fibres in the laundry water blocking the field drain if such is being used.

My septic system (2 separate systems for the house) takes all waste water, the treated discharge from the septic system going to the council drainage system - where the council system discharges to finally I am unsure - but I suspect, unfortunately, into the Nan river at a multitude of locations.
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Re: Grease Traps

Postby thailazer » Mon Jul 28, 2014 5:34 pm

I took the lid off the kitchen sump to check it out, and found just a little more than 2 inches of yellow crud on the entire surface of the 80 cm diameter tank. (I could see it through the small access hole last week which prompted my question.) Dipped it out with a bucket in about ten minutes. That was an accumulation of three years of doing dishes and dumping food waste down the drain. Not too bad so I don't think a grease trap is worth the hassle. Was surprising to find how solid it was as it actually came out in large chunks.

BTW, we have four separate sumps here for the toilets, showers, kitchen, and laundry. With the springs we have on the property I thought it would be prudent to spread our waste water over as wide an area as possible. So far it is working well. Crossing the purchase of a grease trap off the list. Thanks all for your inputs.
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Re: Grease Traps

Postby eyecatcher » Wed Sep 30, 2015 4:12 pm

BKKBILL wrote:Cleaning grease traps is a horrible job as Mike said it all depends on what you put in them. Put in a few concrete rings with a floor to make it water tight and suck it out every couple of years.

Something like this should do.


Ok the concept of the plastic tub is fine but is it necessary to fit the drops/bends to the inlet and outlet?
Two horizontal in and outs surely does thejob equally well.... :shock:
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Re: Grease Traps

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Wed Sep 30, 2015 6:04 pm

eyecatcher wrote:
BKKBILL wrote:Cleaning grease traps is a horrible job as Mike said it all depends on what you put in them. Put in a few concrete rings with a floor to make it water tight and suck it out every couple of years.

Something like this should do.


Ok the concept of the plastic tub is fine but is it necessary to fit the drops/bends to the inlet and outlet?
Two horizontal in and outs surely does thejob equally well.... :shock:

If you have two horizontal in and outs, then it isn't a grease trap :roll:
The inlet bend is to slow the inflow, the double open ended T on the outlet is the grease trap. The open top prevents a siphon effect sucking everything out.
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Re: Grease Traps

Postby BKKBILL » Wed Sep 30, 2015 7:36 pm

Sometimes has it right. If you have a horizontal in and out you have a settling tank, since grease in lighter than water tee on the exit helps to prevent grease from exiting the tank it also prevents siphoning of the contents.

Still needs cleaning and as I said tis a terrible job.
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Re: Grease Traps

Postby schuimpge » Thu Oct 01, 2015 8:28 pm

And EyeCatcher,

Don't get one of those fancy small ones with a nice metal grated basket in it.
You'll regret it as the weir and basket they put in start blocking everything after which you'll be busy cleaning out all pipes from sink to grease-trap.
And yes, BKKBill and Mike are right, that is a stinking, terrible job to do, even if you do it regular without having to clean out the pipes as well.

I took out the weir and basket. It's now just flowing down to the main drain. House didn't have one originally anyway.

Cheers,
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Re: Grease Traps

Postby PNGeo » Wed Feb 10, 2016 8:52 am

Interesting thread, as I have been wondering what to do with my grey water from the new house. I appreciated reading all the comments, ideas and insights. I was originally planning to pipe it all about 50m away from the house into an evaporation trench, but was concerned that it may need cleaning out more frequently than usual, thanks to all the greasy waste due to over-use of cooking oil which is so common here. It sounds like a second, stand-alone concrete septic tank (buried culvert pipes) may be the way to go.

Digging a hole here is always problematic because large basalt boulders are regularly encountered and there's no way of knowing where they are or how big they are until they are struck upon. Being on the Bolaven Plateau, we have plenty of old bomb craters on the block, so maybe I can use one of those. There are 500lb craters within 10-15m of each side of the house which I was planning to turn into fern/orchid gardens but maybe I'll just use one for a garden and use the other for my grey water drainage.

Cheers for now.
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Re: Grease Traps

Postby olavhome » Fri Feb 12, 2016 9:48 am

Will try to use my grey water for garden watering. Will make a French drain along the plants .
Been in this forum some time that plants seems to appreciate the water.
Will make a kind of grease trap before letting the water into the garden.
Time will show what happen :)
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Re: Grease Traps

Postby roy.sokolowski » Tue May 30, 2017 8:00 am

We are in the beginning process of building our home. The local village mayor told us that we would have to get the plans approved through the Or Bor Tor (Village planning Authority) in Lahansai (Buriram) Thailand. We are pretty rural but there is a new requirement (since January of this year) to run the house plans by them for approval. We had the plans drawn up by an architect so it should be OK, but one comment they made about the plans was the lack of a grease trap for the grey water.

We are planning on adding a grease trap, and separating the grey from black water, but that detail was not included in the plans. Just adding to the post to let everyone know that this may be something that they will start requiring on new builds (in some locations anyway).
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